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Joanne Woodward movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Three Faces of Eve,’ ‘Rachel, Rachel’

  • Gold Derby
Joanne Woodward movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Three Faces of Eve,’ ‘Rachel, Rachel’
Joanne Woodward and her husband Paul Newman were one of Hollywood’s golden couples. Both together and separately the actors contributed to some of the most iconic films ever made. While Newman passed away in 2008, Woodward is still with is and on February 27, 2019, celebrates her 89th birthday. Although she has retreated from public life in recent years due to health concerns, her relevance remains strong. Allison Janney made a special point of thanking her when she won her Best Supporting Actress Oscar for “I, Tonya.”

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Woodward started her career on the New York stage and studied at two of New York’s leading acting schools of the day — the Neighborhood Playhouse and the Actors Studio. Success then came to her quite quickly when she won an Oscar for “The Three Faces of Eve,” which was only her third film. She
See full article at Gold Derby »

Joanne Woodward movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Joanne Woodward movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Joanne Woodward and her husband Paul Newman were one of Hollywood’s golden couples. Both together and separately the actors contributed to some of the most iconic films ever made. While Newman passed away in 2008, Woodward is still with is and on February 27, 2019, celebrates her 89th birthday. Although she has retreated from public life in recent years due to health concerns, her relevance remains strong. Allison Janney made a special point of thanking her when she won her Best Supporting Actress Oscar for “I, Tonya.”

Woodward started her career on the New York stage and studied at two of New York’s leading acting schools of the day — the Neighborhood Playhouse and the Actors Studio. Success then came to her quite quickly when she won an Oscar for “The Three Faces of Eve,” which was only her third film. She would go on to earn three more Oscar nominations as
See full article at Gold Derby »

Glenn Close would be the 13th Best Actress Oscar champ as the sole nominee for her film

Glenn Close would be the 13th Best Actress Oscar champ as the sole nominee for her film
It could be lucky No. 7 and 13 for Glenn Close. She picked up her seventh Oscar nomination on Tuesday, for Best Actress for “The Wife,” which did not get any other nominations. If Close’s name is finally in the envelope on Oscar day, she’d be the 13th winner in the category as the only nominee for her film.

The first 12 were:

1. Mary Pickford, “Coquette” (1928/29)

2. Marie Dressler, “Min and Bill” (1930/31)

3. Helen Hayes, “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1931/32)

4. Katharine Hepburn, “Morning Glory” (1932/33)

5. Bette Davis, “Dangerous” (1935)

6. Joanne Woodward, “The Three Faces of Eve” (1957)

7. Sophia Loren, “Two Women” (1961)

8. Jodie Foster, “The Accused” (1988)

9. Kathy Bates, “Misery” (1990)

10. Jessica Lange, “Blue Sky” (1994)

11. Charlize Theron, “Monster” (2003)

12. Julianne Moore, “Still Alice” (2014)

Twelve times in the Oscars’ 90-year history doesn’t sound like a lot, but it is when you look at Best Actor, which only has five solo nominee winners: Emil Jannings, Jose Ferrer, Cliff Robertson, Michael Douglas and Forest Whitaker.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Trilogy of Terror

The 70s brought forth some well-remembered TV horror movies, that shocked impressionable kids back in the days of Watergate and Sonny & Cher. Karen Black top lines Dan Curtis’s trio of malevolent tales, all from original stories by Richard Matheson.

Trilogy of Terror

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1975 / Color / 1:37 flat television / 72 min. / Street Date October 16, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Karen Black, Robert Burton, John Karlen, George Gaynes, Jim Storm, Gregory Harrison, Kathryn Reynolds, Tracy Curtis.

Cinematography: Paul Lohmann

Film Editor: Les Green

Original Music: Bob Cobert

Written by Richard Matheson, William F. Nolan

Produced and Directed by Dan Curtis

As a celebrated horror phenomenon Dan Curtis pretty much passed me by. I know that TV’s Dark Shadows entranced a generation of horror-starved TV fans, but little that I’ve seen from the producer-director made a dent with me, including his feature films and his TV movies of horror classics.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Simpsons’: Gal Gadot Plays Herself In Season Premiere Episode ‘Bart’s Not Dead’ — Exclusive First Look

  • Indiewire
‘The Simpsons’: Gal Gadot Plays Herself In Season Premiere Episode ‘Bart’s Not Dead’ — Exclusive First Look
The Simpsons” takes on the recent trend of religious films at the box office in the show’s Season 30 premiere, “Bart’s Not Dead.” The episode features several guest vocal stars, including “Wonder Woman’s” Gal Gadot. Scroll down below for a first look at Gadot, playing herself — auditioning for a role in “Bart’s Not Dead,” a religious film being spearhead by Ned Flanders (naturally) and Homer Simpson (really).

In the episode, which premieres Sunday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m. Et on Fox, Bart ends up in the hospital after taking a dare and jumping off the Springfield dam. At Homer’s urging, Bart claims he went to Heaven and met Jesus — and that attracts Christian producers to offer the Simpsons a movie deal, which they turn into the religious film “Bart’s Not Dead” (a riff on the real box office hit “God’s Not Dead”). Among the guests on the episode: Emily Deschanel,
See full article at Indiewire »

First Poster For The Simpsons’ Next Treehouse Of Horror Special Arrives Early

Even though I’ve been a fan of The Simpsons for more than two decades, I must confess that I’ve somewhat lapsed on the show in the last few seasons. Sure, I stuck it out longer than some other folks, but I eventually had to concede that the A-material is long behind us.

Still, I’ll check out what my favorite animated family is up to from time to time, particularly whenever Halloween rolls around. As per usual, the creative team behind the series will be rolling out “Treehouse of Horrors Xxix” soon enough, and believe it or not, there’s already a poster circulating for it.

Thanks to the folks over at Indie Wire, we’re able to bring you this early look at a piece set to debut at San Diego Comic-Con later this month. Seen below, it gets across the idea that the anthology special will lampoon Jurassic World/Park,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Simpsons Travel to a Geriatric Version of ‘Jurassic Park’ in Comic-Con Poster — Exclusive

  • Indiewire
The Simpsons Travel to a Geriatric Version of ‘Jurassic Park’ in Comic-Con Poster — Exclusive
For the 29th edition of its annual Halloween-themed “Treehouse of Horror” franchise, “The Simpsons” are taking a trip… to “Jurassic Park.”

Only these dinosaurs are more of the Grandpa Simpson variety. “Geriatric Park” is among the highlights of this year’s “Treehouse of Horror,” as evidenced by a new poster that Fox and “The Simpsons” will pass out at next week’s San Diego Comic-Con. Fox has given IndieWire a first look at the one-sheet — and fans of the show’s annual horror parody won’t be disappointed. Scroll down for a view of this year’s Comic-Con poster, devoted to “Treehouse of Horror Xxix.”

Executive producer Al Jean had earlier hinted on Twitter that the next “Treehouse” edition will satirize “Jurassic Park,” “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and “The Three Faces of Eve,” and that appears to be borne out on the poster. Here’s the logline for “Treehouse
See full article at Indiewire »

The Last Word on ‘Split’

(Growls under breath.) Excuse me, for a minute think about ‘Split’.

(Gets up walks out of room. Loud banding of wall continues and correlates as the next words are heard offscreen, being screamed)

Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid!, Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! Stupid! (long breath) Stupid!

(Lots of deep breaths, water running being heard from another room for a few moments.It’s then stopped shortly before David walks back out with a handtowel drying off bloody and cut hands, holding his wrist tightly but softly as he prepares to retake his position behind the keyboard. Deep breath!)

Okay, I’ll give him this, at least, technically that wasn’t a post-credits scene. (Sigh) That was still stupid though.

Before I begin,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities

  • Indiewire
Here Are 59 Actors Who Landed Oscar Nominations For Portraying Characters With Disabilities
Triumph over adversity is drama defined, and Oscar nominations often go to actors whose characters find victory over physical or mental afflictions. The earliest example goes back to 1947; that was the year that non-pro Harold Russell won Best Supporting Actor and a special award for “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Russell was a WWII veteran who lost both of his hands while making a training film. Of note: Of the 59, 27 of these nominations went on to a win. This year’s roster of stars playing afflicted characters includes Jake Gyllenhaal as bombing victim Jeff Baumer in “Stronger,” Andrew Garfield as polio survivor Robin Cavendish in “Breathe,” Bryan Cranston as a millionaire quadriplegic in “The Upside,” and Sally Hawkins in two roles, as an arthritic painter in “Maudie” and a mute lab worker in “The Shape of Water.”

Check out Oscar’s rather astonishing legacy of afflicted contenders below.

Blind
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Betty Buckley Talks Working with M. Night Shyamalan for Split and Reflects on Carrie (1976)

As a man with multiple personalities (23, to be exact), James McAvoy is enthralling to watch in in M. Night Shyamalan's Split, but just as intriguing is his psychiatrist, Dr. Karen Fletcher, played by the great Betty Buckley, who plays a nail-biting mental chess match with her multi-dimensional patient in some of the film's most fascinating scenes.

With Split now out on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Buckley (whom many may know as Abby Bradford from Eight is Enough) about working with Shyamalan on both Split and The Happening, playing Miss Collins in Brian De Palma's Carrie (1976) and Margaret White in the ’80s Broadway musical adaptation of Stephen King's seminal novel, her new album Story Songs, and more.

Thanks so much for taking the time to talk with me today and congratulations on Split. I loved the film,
See full article at DailyDead »

29 Days until Oscar

29 is the number of the day. It's also the most common age for Best Actress winners. That's quite something if you consider that the youngest best actor winner of all time was 29 and just a month shy of his 30th (Adrien Brody, The Pianist). The gender bias that preferences young actresses and older men gets even worse when you realize that Half of all Best Actress winners won by the age of 33. Less than 10% of Best Actor winners were 33 and under. The eight women who won at 29 are...

Emma Stone is the youngest Best Actress nominee this year at 28 and expected to win by most pundits. Stone is the same age now as the following winners were: Norma Shearer in The Divorcee, Joanne Woodward in The Three Faces of Eve, Luise Rainer in The Good Earth and Charlize Theron in Monster.

Curiously there is no "most common age" for Best
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Boston Strangler

True-Crime Terror! Richard Fleischer and Edward Anhalt’s riveting serial killer makes extensive use of split- and multi-screen imagery. One of the most infamous murder sprees on record fudges some facts but still impresses as a novel approach.

The Boston Strangler

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 116 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring Tony Curtis, Henry Fonda, George Kennedy, Mike Kellin, Hurd Hatfield, Murray Hamilton, Jeff Corey, Sally Kellerman, George Furth

Cinematography Richard H. Kline

Art Direction Richard Day, Jack Martin Smith

Film Editor Marion Rothman

Written by Edward Anhalt from the book by Gerold Frank

Produced by Robert Fryer

Directed by Richard Fleischer

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Twelve years ago i wasn’t all that impressed with The Boston Strangler. I thought it too slick and felt that its noted multi-screen sequences were a trick gimmick. I appreciate it more now — except for the name cast,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Paul Newman Talks About The Joy (And Pain) Of Finally Winning His Oscar In 1987 Interview – Watch

Paul Newman Talks About The Joy (And Pain) Of Finally Winning His Oscar In 1987 Interview – Watch
The Color of Money” wasn’t a Martin Scorsese project: iI was a Paul Newman project. The acclaimed actor, an enormous fan of “Raging Bull,” wrote the director a fan letter asking to make a picture based on a 1984 novel by Walter Tevis. The resulting film is one of Scorsese’s most uncharacteristic, framing the story as comeback narrative for Newman’s pool hustler Fast Eddie Felson — though it’s arguable they never really show him leaving the game at all.

The final film lets Newman’s star persona bounce off the power of a rising Tom Cruise in an oddly sweet and optimistic package, one that would finally win Paul Newman his first Oscar in 1987 for Best Actor. A few weeks before the ceremony, Newman sat down with “Film 87” host Russell Harty to talk about that elusive trophy, as well as what it’s like to be Paul Newman
See full article at Indiewire »

Progressive social activist, 'The Sound of Music' Broadway Star, and Oscar-Nominated Actor Bikel Dead at 91

Theodore Bikel. Theodore Bikel dead at 91: Oscar-nominated actor and folk singer best known for stage musicals 'The Sound of Music,' 'Fiddler on the Roof' Folk singer, social and union activist, and stage, film, and television actor Theodore Bikel, best remembered for starring in the Broadway musical The Sound of Music and, throughout the U.S., in Fiddler on the Roof, died Monday morning (July 20, '15) of "natural causes" at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Austrian-born Bikel – as Theodore Meir Bikel on May 2, 1924, in Vienna, to Yiddish-speaking Eastern European parents – was 91. Fled Hitler Thanks to his well-connected Zionist father, six months after the German annexation of Austria in March 1938 ("they were greeted with jubilation by the local populace," he would recall in 2012), the 14-year-old Bikel and his family fled to Palestine, at the time a British protectorate. While there, the teenager began acting on stage,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Last Surviving Gwtw Star and 2-Time Oscar Winner Has Turned 99: As a Plus, She Made U.S. Labor Law History

Olivia de Havilland picture U.S. labor history-making 'Gone with the Wind' star and two-time Best Actress winner Olivia de Havilland turns 99 (This Olivia de Havilland article is currently being revised and expanded.) Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland, the only surviving major Gone with the Wind cast member and oldest surviving Oscar winner, is turning 99 years old today, July 1.[1] Also known for her widely publicized feud with sister Joan Fontaine and for her eight movies with Errol Flynn, de Havilland should be remembered as well for having made Hollywood labor history. This particular history has nothing to do with de Havilland's films, her two Oscars, Gone with the Wind, Joan Fontaine, or Errol Flynn. Instead, history was made as a result of a legal fight: after winning a lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the mid-'40s, Olivia de Havilland put an end to treacherous
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Able to Disable: Top 10 Oscar-Winning Disability-Bound Movie Characters

The old saying goes is that if you want to win an Academy Award then the best way is to undertake playing a disabled part or portraying a famous personality in a biopic. In some cases, actors have accomplished both themes and reached their Oscar-attaining goals (see Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker or Daniel-Day Lewis in My Left Foot for instance).

In Able to Disable: Top 10 Oscar-Winning Disability-Bound Movie Characters we will look at the top movie characters that became Academy Award-winning figures within their films. Interestingly, there have been a couple of performers that were real-life disabled individuals that convincingly embodied their fictional disabled alter egos (see Harold Russell from The Best Days of Our Lives or Marlee Matlin from Children of a Lesser God).

Anyway, this selection of Able to Disable: Top 10 Oscar-Winning Disability-Bound Movie Characters are (in alphabetical order according to film title):
See full article at SoundOnSight »

5 reasons why Jefferson Mays ('Gentleman's Guide') will win Best Musical Actor at Tonys'

5 reasons why Jefferson Mays ('Gentleman's Guide') will win Best Musical Actor at Tonys'
All of our Experts are predicting that Neil Patrick Harris will win the Tony Award for Best Actor (Musical) this Sunday for his riveting work in "Hedwig and the Angry Inch." However, watch out for "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" star Jefferson Mays, who tied with him at the Drama Desk Awards last Sunday. Here's why: -Break- Dish all the Tony races in our red-hot forums 1. He's playing multiple characters. Mays plays eight very different roles. In 2004, he won Best Actor (Play) back in 2004 for "I Am My Own Wife," a solo show in which he played more than 40 people. Among the others who have have won trophies for taking on many parts at once: Joanne Woodward bagged an Oscar for "The Three Faces of Eve," Sally Field made a name for herself with her Emmy-winning turn as "Sybil" and Toni Collette took home an Emmy for playing
See full article at Gold Derby »

Toni Collette appears in first trailer for Lucky Them - watch

Toni Collette appears in first trailer for Lucky Them - watch
IFC Films has outed the first trailer for Lucky Them.

The comedy drama stars Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church.

In the film Collette plays a veteran rock journalist by the name of Ellie Klug, who is assigned to track down her ex-boyfriend.

Haden Church plays her sidekick, a documentary filmmaker.

Lucky Them made its debut at the Toronto International Film Festival last year, receiving high praise.

The film comes from The Off Hours and Eden director Megan Griffiths.

Ryan Eggold (The Blacklist) and Joanne Woodward (The Three Faces of Eve) also star.

An official release date for Lucky Them has yet to be revealed.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »
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