Love in the Afternoon (1957) - News Poster

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Avanti!

Need a break from violence, misery, and injustice? Or maybe just the network TV news? Billy Wilder’s last great comic romance is an Italian vacation soaked in music, food, scenery and sunshine. It’s the best movie ever about Love and Funerals.

Avanti!

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1972 / Color/ 1:85 widescreen / 140 min. / Street Date October 10, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jack Lemmon, Juliet Mills, Clive Revill, Edward Andrews, Harry Ray, Guidarino Guidi, Franco Acampora, Sergio Bruni, Ty Hardin.

Cinematography: Luigi Kuveiller

Film Editor: Ralph Winters

Art direction: Ferdinando Scarfiotti

Music Arranger: Carlo Rustichelli

Italian standards by Gino Paoli, Giuseppi Capaldo, Vittoriao Fassone, Don Backy, Detto Mariano, Sergio Brui, Salvatore Cardillo, Umberto Bertini, Paolo Marchetti.

Written by I.A.L Diamond and Billy Wilder from a play by Samuel L. Taylor

Produced and Directed by Billy Wilder

When Billy Wilder was reaching advanced old age, good friends rallied to make sure
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies Excerpt: My Nightmare Day on The Americans' Set With Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys

Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies Excerpt: My Nightmare Day on The Americans' Set With Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys
Keri Russell was unwittingly by my side at the start of the most painful chapter of my life.

The wretched afternoon in question is chronicled in my new memoir, Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies, which is available beginning today at your local bookstore and all major online retailers. The tome delves into my 13-year relationship with my late husband, Kit Cowan, who — as followers of mine on social media and regular readers of TVLine know — died in 2015 after an 11-month battle with a rare and merciless form of colorectal cancer.

Although flashbacks to the early days of our goofy, amorous
See full article at TVLine.com »

Cécile Decugis: French New Wave Editor of ‘Breathless’ Dies at 87

Cécile Decugis: French New Wave Editor of ‘Breathless’ Dies at 87
Cécile Decugis, one of the key early figures of the French New Wave, passed away June 11, according to El Watan, the French-language newspaper in Algeria. The news only started to spread throughout the film world when fellow editor and protege Mary Stephens paid tribute to the Decugis in a Facebook post.

At the dawn of the New Wave in 1957, Decugis edited a young Francois Truffaut’s short film “Les Mistons,” which is largely credited as being the first film in which Truffaut found his cinematic voice and being a key early short of the film movement that would dominate international cinema in the ’60s.

Read More: Jean-Luc Godard’s Rare, Early Film, ‘Une Femme Coquette,’ Appears on YouTube — Watch

Decugis also edited Jean-Luc Godard’s first feature, “Breathless,” one the most important pieces of editing in film history and the movie that made Godard a filmmaking sensation. Although the film
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made
Without uttering a word, the main title sequence for FX’s new anthology series “Feud: Bette and Joan” sets the dramatic yet somber tone for the entire series by using musical and graphical cues from ‘60s cinema.

While the images trace the plot of “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?,” it also reflects the misery of the actresses drawn into a cycle of torment of their own devising. Take a look at the sequence:

The credits fit right in with “Feud,” a technicolor feast that examines the even more colorful rivalry between acclaimed actresses Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, which reached its pinnacle while they co-starred in the psycho-biddy horror movie “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” in 1962. The series takes place during and after the shooting of the film, in which Bette (Susan Sarandon) and Joan (Jessica Lange) play combative siblings Baby Jane and Blanche, respectively. There is no love lost between these sisters,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Review: Samuel L. Jackson Brings James Baldwin to Life in the Year’s Most Important Oscar Nominee

‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Review: Samuel L. Jackson Brings James Baldwin to Life in the Year’s Most Important Oscar Nominee
There’s a remarkable cut in the opening minutes of Raoul Peck’s “I Am Not Your Negro” that instantly transforms this insightful cinematic essay into the most important movie of the year so far.

It’s the late 60’s, and James Baldwin appears on “The Dick Cavett Show” to explain his views on black life in America. “The real question,” he says, “is what’s going to happen to this country?” Peck abruptly shifts to the present, assembling a collage of images from black protests against police violence, set to the boisterous rhythms of Buddy Guy’s “Damn Right, I’ve Got the Blues.” That complex fusion of times, places and feelings yields an angry rallying cry that also functions as a lamentation of historical struggle, and it continues for the next 90 minutes. Peck doesn’t just resurrect Baldwin’s words from a contemporary perspective; he reignites their sense of purpose.
See full article at Indiewire »

Love in the Afternoon

Love in the Afternoon

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1957 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 130 min. / Street Date February 7, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Gary Cooper, Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier, John McGiver, Van Doude, Lise Bourdin, Louis Jourdan, Betty Schneider.

Cinematography: William C. Mellor

Film Editor: Leonid Azar

Art Direction: Alexandre Trauner

Adapted Music: Franz Waxman

Written by: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond from a novel by Claude Anet

Produced and Directed by Billy Wilder

A favorite of Billy Wilder-philes, Love in the Afternoon is a strong expression of the ‘romantic-Lubitsch’ vein in Wilder’s work. It’s essentially a return to the early ’30s Lubitsch comedies with Maurice Chevalier, but played in a more bittersweet Viennese register. It’s also Wilder’s first collaboration with the comedy screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond. Together they fashion the predominantly verbal comedy machine that will carry them through three or four big hits, and a few losers that have become classics anyway.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Yakuza

The Yakuza

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 & 123 min. / Street Date February 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Robert Mitchum, Takakura Ken, Brian Keith, Eiji Okada, Richard Jordan, Keiko Kishi, James Shigeta, Herb Edelman.

Cinematography: Kozo Okazaki, Duke Callaghan

Production Design: Stephen Grimes

Art Direction: Yoshiyuki Ishida

Film Editor: Don Guidice, Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Dave Grusin

Written by: Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader, Robert Towne

Produced by: Michael Hamilburg, Sydney Pollack, Koji Shundo

Directed by Sydney Pollack

The Warner Archive Collection is on a roll with a 2017 schedule that has so far released one much-desired library Blu-ray per week. Coming shortly are Vincente Minnelli’s Bells are Ringing, Billy Wilder’s Love in the Afternoon Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend and Val Guest’s When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, and that only takes us through February. First up is a piercing action drama from 1975.

There are favorite movies around Savant central,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Daily | Goings On | Rohmer, Mamoulian, Makhmalbaf

From September 16 through 29, the Film Society of Lincoln Center will be screening new restorations of all six films that make up Eric Rohmer's Moral Tales: The Bakery Girl of Monceau, Suzanne’s Career, My Night at Maud's, La collectionneuse, Claire's Knee and Love in the Afternoon. More goings on: Work by Curt McDowell and Tom Rubnitz, Derek Jarman's Will You Dance With Me?, David Miller's Sudden Fear with Joan Crawford in New York; The Monkees and Guillermo del Toro in Los Angeles; Rouben Mamoulian at Harvard; art inspired by Wes Anderson's films in San Francisco; remembering Abbas Kiarostami in Toronto; and a Mohsen Makhmalbaf series in London. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Goings On | Rohmer, Mamoulian, Makhmalbaf

From September 16 through 29, the Film Society of Lincoln Center will be screening new restorations of all six films that make up Eric Rohmer's Moral Tales: The Bakery Girl of Monceau, Suzanne’s Career, My Night at Maud's, La collectionneuse, Claire's Knee and Love in the Afternoon. More goings on: Work by Curt McDowell and Tom Rubnitz, Derek Jarman's Will You Dance With Me?, David Miller's Sudden Fear with Joan Crawford in New York; The Monkees and Guillermo del Toro in Los Angeles; Rouben Mamoulian at Harvard; art inspired by Wes Anderson's films in San Francisco; remembering Abbas Kiarostami in Toronto; and a Mohsen Makhmalbaf series in London. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

TCM Oscar Homage Kicked Off Today: Is Bigger Always Better?

'Ben-Hur' 1959 with Stephen Boyd and Charlton Heston: TCM's '31 Days of Oscar.' '31 Days of Oscar': 'Lawrence of Arabia' and 'Ben-Hur' are in, Paramount stars are out Today, Feb. 1, '16, Turner Classic Movies is kicking off the 21st edition of its “31 Days of Oscar.” While the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is being vociferously reviled for its “lack of diversity” – more on that appallingly myopic, self-serving, and double-standard-embracing furore in an upcoming post – TCM is celebrating nearly nine decades of the Academy Awards. That's the good news. The disappointing news is that if you're expecting to find rare Paramount, Universal, or Fox/20th Century Fox entries in the mix, you're out of luck. So, missing from the TCM schedule are, among others: Best Actress nominees Ruth Chatterton in Sarah and Son, Nancy Carroll in The Devil's Holiday, Claudette Colbert in Private Worlds. Unofficial Best Actor
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Alex Karpovsky Joins Jena Malone In Remake Of Eric Rohmer's 'Le Beau Mariage'

Beloved French filmmaker Eric Rohmer's work has already seen an interesting interpretation in Hollywood — Chris Rock remade "Love In The Afternoon" with "I Think I Love My Wife." Now a decidedly more indie production is borrowing the pages of Rohmer, and, featuring two pretty great actors, it has our attention. Read More: Jena Malone To Star In 'Le Beau Mariage' Redo Alex Karpovsky joins the previously cast Jena Malone in "Claire," a redo of the 1982 film "Le Beau Mariage." The story follows a young woman who decides to dump her married lover and get married herself, to her best friend's cousin. Zany! Of course, Rohmer himself had a deft and original hand at these kinds of scenarios, so it'll be interesting to see how the screenwriters Juan Iglesias and Jonathan Saba tackle the material. Meanwhile, behind the camera will be music video director Dori Oskowitz, who will make his feature debut.
See full article at The Playlist »

Criterion Picks On Fandor: Eight French Films

Each week, the fine folks at Fandor add a number of films to their Criterion Picks area, which will then be available to subscribers for the following twelve days. This week, the Criterion Picks focus on eight delightful French films.

Three decades of exceptional French cinema in the service of that most intoxicating, unpredictable and stubborn of muscles, to which laws of convention and commitment prove no barrier: the heart.

Don’t have a Fandor subscription? They offer a free trial membership.

Children of Paradise by Marcel Carne

Poetic realism reached sublime heights with Children Of Paradise, widely considered one of the greatest French films of all time. This nimble depiction of nineteenth-century Paris’s theatrical demimonde, filmed during World War II, follows a mysterious woman loved by four different men (all based on historical figures): an actor, a criminal, a count, and, most poignantly, a mime (Jean-Louis Barrault,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Two-Time Oscar Winner Cooper on TCM: Pro-War 'York' and Eastwood-Narrated Doc

Gary Cooper movies on TCM: Cooper at his best and at his weakest Gary Cooper is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 30, '15. Unfortunately, TCM isn't showing any Cooper movie premiere – despite the fact that most of his Paramount movies of the '20s and '30s remain unavailable. This evening's features are Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Sergeant York (1941), and Love in the Afternoon (1957). Mr. Deeds Goes to Town solidified Gary Cooper's stardom and helped to make Jean Arthur Columbia's top female star. The film is a tad overlong and, like every Frank Capra movie, it's also highly sentimental. What saves it from the Hell of Good Intentions is the acting of the two leads – Cooper and Arthur are both excellent – and of several supporting players. Directed by Howard Hawks, the jingoistic, pro-war Sergeant York was a huge box office hit, eventually earning Academy Award nominations in several categories,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Losers on the Road in the Neverland of California Wineries and Neurotic Peter Pan-ish Males

'Sideways' movie, with Paul Giamatti and Thomas Haden Church 'Sideways' movie review: California winery tour follows conventional road to male maturity With the 1999 Matthew Broderick-Reese Witherspoon vehicle Election, Alexander Payne displayed a flair for satirical comedy the likes of which would have turned Billy Wilder greener (with envy) than the Sideways poster found further below in this commentary. With the 2002 Jack Nicholson star vehicle About Schmidt, Payne demonstrated that his comedic flair could go the way of Wilder's in fluff like Sabrina and Love in the Afternoon: artificial, cutesy, bland.* In Sideways, Payne opted for the safer About Schmidt route – which may explain the film's enormous popularity with critics and audiences alike. For my part, I found his adaptation (with Jim Taylor) of Rex Pickett's novel to be an overlong, moralistic, and thoroughly unconvincing effort. (Warning: This Sideways movie review contains spoilers.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Daily | 3 on Rohmer

In the 1990s, novelist and political activist Nadja Tesich looked back on her days in Paris, specifically the day in the mid-1960s when Eric Rohmer asked her to work with him on Nadja à Paris. Meantime, at the Av Club, Mike D'Angelo picks a scene from Love in the Afternoon, a montage featuring actresses Rohmer had worked with: Françoise Fabian, Béatrice Romand, Marie-Christine Barrault, Haydée Politoff, Laurence De Monaghan and Aurora Cornu. And for Artinfo, Craig Hubert talks with Corina Copp about her first book, titled after and inspired by Rohmer's 1986 film, The Green Ray. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | 3 on Rohmer

In the 1990s, novelist and political activist Nadja Tesich looked back on her days in Paris, specifically the day in the mid-1960s when Eric Rohmer asked her to work with him on Nadja à Paris. Meantime, at the Av Club, Mike D'Angelo picks a scene from Love in the Afternoon, a montage featuring actresses Rohmer had worked with: Françoise Fabian, Béatrice Romand, Marie-Christine Barrault, Haydée Politoff, Laurence De Monaghan and Aurora Cornu. And for Artinfo, Craig Hubert talks with Corina Copp about her first book, titled after and inspired by Rohmer's 1986 film, The Green Ray. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

5 to 7 | Review

Love in the Afternoon: Levin’s Gallic Flavored Romantic Drama Lacks Sense of Amour Fou

Writer and producer Victor Levin makes a patiently observed portrait of unconventional romance in the heterosexual realm with the warmly performed 5 to 7, so named for the French saying “Le cinq a sept,” which basically means happy hour but carries playful connotations of extramarital romance in the hazy, undocumented hours afforded the working class before reporting for duties on the domestic hearth. Playful, observant, and provoking to those who’ve never considered the possibility (or worthiness) of such an arrangement as the romantic involvement suggested here, the film feels calibrated towards the type of American conservatism that can only begin to fathom such quandaries through the guise of a pronounced European influence.

Here, it is a French couple suggesting that monogamy has little to do with a successful marriage, and a series of intellectual Manhattan
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Five Unmissable Buñuel Classics Tonight on TCM

Luis Buñuel movies on TCM tonight (photo: Catherine Deneuve in 'Belle de Jour') The city of Paris and iconoclastic writer-director Luis Buñuel are Turner Classic Movies' themes today and later this evening. TCM's focus on Luis Buñuel is particularly welcome, as he remains one of the most daring and most challenging filmmakers since the invention of film. Luis Buñuel is so remarkable, in fact, that you won't find any Hollywood hipster paying homage to him in his/her movies. Nor will you hear his name mentioned at the Academy Awards – no matter the Academy in question. And rest assured that most film critics working today have never even heard of him, let alone seen any of his movies. So, nowadays Luis Buñuel is un-hip, un-cool, and unfashionable. He's also unquestionably brilliant. These days everyone is worried about freedom of expression. The clash of civilizations. The West vs. The Other.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The 50 Definitive Relationship Dramas: 20-11

20. Love/Chloe in the Afternoon (1972)

Directed by: Éric Rohmer

Originally titled “Love in the Afternoon,” but released in North America as “Chloe in the Afternoon,” this Rohmer film is a tale of possible infidelity, seen through the eyes of a conflicted man. Frédéric (Bernard Verley) is a successful young lawyer who is happily married to a teacher named Hélène (Françoise Verley), who is pregnant with their second child. While Frédéric is in a considerably good place in his life, he still struggles with the loss of excitement he had before he married, when he could sleep with whomever he chose. It wasn’t so much the sex that thrilled him, but the chase itself. Still, he feels that these thoughts and fantasies, paired with his refusal to act upon them, only proves that he is completely dedicated and in love with his own wife. That is, until he meets Chloé
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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