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Paradise Lagoon (1957) Poster

Trivia

For much of his role as Bill Crichton, Kenneth More was filmed from the waist up to hide the fact that he was wearing shorts with his dinner-jacket because of the heat during filming.
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The Red Dwarf robot/android "Kryten" was named after the butler, Crichton (the SF robot has the same name, but this time phonetically).
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The film was released in the US as "Paradise Lagoon." The distributors feared that if they used the original J.M. Barrie title the public would think the film was about a naval officer.
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The film was adapted into a musical entitled "Our Man Crichton" which premiered in London on December 21, 1964. Kenneth More repeated his film role of Crichton in the musical version.
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Although Douglas Gamley is credited as sole composer, Richard Addinsell, of "Warsaw Concerto" fame, supplied the original dance music, including a waltz, a polka, and a galop. These pieces were reconstructed, recorded, and released on CD in 2003.
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The original Broadway production of "The Admirable Crichton" by J.M. Barrie opened at the Lyceum Theater on November 17, 1903, ran for 144 performances with William Gillette {famous for his Sherlock Holmes plays and portrayal} in the title role. The play was revived on Broadway in 1931.
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At one stage, Paramount were keen to cast David Niven in its planned version.
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J.M. Barrie's play was adapted earlier for the screen by Paramount Pictures as the musical We're Not Dressing (1934), which starred Bing Crosby as Crichton.
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In real life the Admirable Crichton was a 16th century Scot named James Crichton. He was a prodigy as a scholar and swordsman and found fame in France and then Italy where he was killed at the age of 21.
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The third most popular film in Britain in 1957, following High Society (1956) and Doctor at Large (1957), according to an article in the 27 December 1957 edition of the Manchester Guardian newspaper.
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According to an article in the 6 January 1952 edition of the New York Times, Alexander Korda had the film rights to the play and intended to produce it with Rex Harrison in the lead role.
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In an article in the 26 January 1956 edition of The Hollywood Reporter, producer Mike Todd had an option on the play and intended Robert Newton and Cantinflas to have leading roles.
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Was filmed on the same beach as Mysterious Island (1961). And weirdly Beth Rogan ex husband marries Mercy Haystead who played Catherine. Both movies had a character "Lady Mary".
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Two of the uncredited guests at the ball were husband and wife Jack Armstrong and Alecia St Leger.
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