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3:10 to Yuma (1957)

Broke small-time rancher Dan Evans is hired by the stagecoach line to put big-time captured outlaw leader Ben Wade on the 3:10 train to Yuma but Wade's gang tries to free him.

Director:

Delmer Daves

Writers:

Halsted Welles (screenplay), Elmore Leonard (story)
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Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Glenn Ford ... Ben Wade
Van Heflin ... Dan Evans
Felicia Farr ... Emmy
Leora Dana ... Mrs. Alice Evans
Henry Jones ... Alex Potter - Town Drunk
Richard Jaeckel ... Charlie Prince
Robert Emhardt ... Mr. Butterfield - Stage Line Owner
Sheridan Comerate Sheridan Comerate ... Bob Moons - Stage Driver's Brother
George Mitchell ... Bartender
Robert Ellenstein ... Ernie Collins
Ford Rainey ... Bisbee Marshal
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Storyline

After outlaw leader Ben Wade is captured in a small town, his gang continue to threaten. Small-time rancher Dan Evans is persuaded to take Wade in secret to the nearest town with a railway station to await the train to the court at Yuma. Once the two are holed up in the hotel to wait it becomes apparent the secret is out, and a battle of wills starts. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Lonesome Whistle of a Train... bringing the gallows closer to a desperado--the showdown nearer to his captor! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

September 1957 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Three Ten to Yuma See more »

Filming Locations:

Yuma, Arizona, USA See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$1,850,000, 31 December 1957
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film caused "Yuma" to enter the lexicon of Cuban slang: Yumas is a term for American visitors, while La Yuma is the United States. See more »

Goofs

As the bad guy posse rides into Contention City, in a couple of scenes you'll note seven men on horseback. However, when Ben Wade looks out the window to talk to his gang, there are eight men present. At the same time, one of the men in the hotel states to Butterfield that he counted seven men, while Wade remarks to Evans after one of his men is shot, 'it's now one against seven'. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Mr. Butterfield, Stage Line Owner: Let me warn you - I am Mr. Butterfield; this is my line, these are my passengers. You bother any of them, I'll hound you from here to kingdom come.
Ben Wade: Mr. Butterfield, we don't mean to bother anybody - we just mean to get what's under that tarpaulin up there, that's all
See more »

Connections

Spoofed in The Librarians: And the Silver Screen (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

3:10 to Yuma
by Ned Washington and George Duning
Sung by Frankie Laine
A Columbia Recording Artist
also performed by Norma Zimmer (uncredited)
See more »

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User Reviews

Striking Imagery
15 August 2005 | by LechuguillaSee all my reviews

In the Old West, a meek family man (Van Heflin), already under pressure to save his cattle and homestead from a devastating drought, must now confront a ruthless, but smooth-talking, killer (Glenn Ford). Textured characterization of these two men, with seemingly opposite motivations, more than offsets a somewhat thin story, a credit both to the film's dialogue and to the acting.

The pace is slow and plodding. The tension builds gradually, as the clock counts down the hours and minutes to the arrival of the 3:10 p.m. train to Yuma (Arizona), that will end the standoff. The film's simple theme of good vs. evil evokes similar stories from the old Gunsmoke TV series of the 1950s.

The film gets off to a powerful start, with a stark B&W image of a distant stage coach moving across a barren desert landscape, as Frankie Laine wails, with affectation, the mournful theme song. It's one of the most striking opening scenes in cinema history.

While the dialogue and acting are more than competent, it's the visuals that really distinguish this film. The overall B&W imagery provided by cinematographer Charles Lawton, Jr. is almost in the same league as the B&W imagery from cinematographers Gregg Toland and Stanley Cortez.

Apart from the thin story, my only significant quibble with the film is its finale, which I found to be unrealistic, and unsatisfying. These issues aside, "3:10 To Yuma" is a technically well made western that thankfully eschews displays of gratuitous violence, and focuses instead on the psychology of human conflict.


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