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A Man Escaped (1956)

Un condamné à mort s'est échappé ou Le vent souffle où il veut (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama, Thriller, War | 26 August 1957 (USA)
A captured French Resistance fighter during WWII engineers a daunting escape from a Nazi prison in France.

Director:

Robert Bresson

Writers:

André Devigny (memoir), Robert Bresson (scenario) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
François Leterrier ... Le lieutenant Fontaine
Charles Le Clainche Charles Le Clainche ... François Jost
Maurice Beerblock Maurice Beerblock ... Blanchet
Roland Monod Roland Monod ... Le pasteur Deleyris
Jacques Ertaud Jacques Ertaud ... Orsini
Jean Paul Delhumeau Jean Paul Delhumeau ... Hebrard
Roger Treherne Roger Treherne ... Terry
Jean Philippe Delamarre Jean Philippe Delamarre ... Le prisonnier 10
Jacques Oerlemans Jacques Oerlemans ... Le gardien-chef
Klaus Detlef Grevenhorst Klaus Detlef Grevenhorst ... L'officier de L'Abwehr
Leonhard Schmidt Leonhard Schmidt ... Le garde de l'escorte
Roger Planchon ... Le garde cycliste
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Storyline

Captured French Resistance fighter Lieutenant Fontaine awaits a certain death sentence for espionage in a stark Nazi prison in Lyon, France. Facing malnourishment and paralyzing fear, he must plot an extraordinary escape, complicated by the questions of whom to trust, and what lies beyond the small portion of the prison they are housed in. Written by Sam Spector

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Robert Bresson's Prize Winning Film

Genres:

Drama | Thriller | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Robert Bresson himself had been a prisoner of war during WWII. See more »

Quotes

Le lieutenant Fontaine: [Narrating, as he and other prisoners go back to their cells after a short break outside] Time to empty our slop pails and run a little water over our faces, then back to our cells for the entire day. With nothing to do, no news and in terrible solitude, we were 100 unfortunates awaiting our fate. I had no illusions about my own. If I could only escape, run away...
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Alternate Versions

After the "Fin" title card, there is a version that plays music to a black screen, while another version displays "Exit Music" in white letters against the black screen. See more »

Connections

Featured in My Journey Through French Cinema (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Great Mass in C Minor, No.16 (K.427) - Kyrie
Written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
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User Reviews

 
A minimalist, yet electrifying film
9 December 2007 | by niezoneSee all my reviews

What makes a movie great? Sometimes we find it in an actor's performance, sometimes it lies in the plot, maybe is the suspense, or amazing action scenes. "A Man Escaped", a movie by acclaimed director Robert Bresson delivers none of those elements we usually associate with great films. However, the expertise and craftsmanship of Bresson makes for an unparalleled experience, full of non-stop suspense that keeps you at the edge of your seat, captivated by every action and every move. In fact, this is one of the first times in recent memory when I don't end up checking my watch, or looking around, or even exchanging a couple of words with my company. "A Man Escaped" simply doesn't allow you to catch your breath. Bresson is known for his very distinct style, in which his interest goes beyond performances or strong plots, but rather relies on the character of his scenes, in the way he builds each and every take to make you build the environment for yourself. Bresson is the mastermind behind the term "suggestive" cinema. He shows you just enough for you to build the scene on your own and it is such a subtle directing skill, that you don't realize unless you carefully study the art of his direction. Bresson submerges us in a prisoner's routine, inside a process of patience and conviction that eventually pays off. Bresson goes as far as to show us the result of the movie in its very title, fully confident that even when you know what will happen at the end, there is no way you won't feel the increasing tension, and electrifying suspense that starts from the very first scenes. At the end, it is a movie about patience, about the intellect of a prisoner whose will and desire to escape a prison portrays the strengths of the human spirit. However, the movie does not have uplifting phrases that often fall into clichés. This, ladies and gentleman, is what cinema can do for us. Less is more.


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Details

Country:

France

Language:

French | German

Release Date:

26 August 1957 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Man Escaped or: The Wind Bloweth Where It Listeth See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (censored)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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