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Charlton Heston movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘The Ten Commandments’

  • Gold Derby
Charlton Heston movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘The Ten Commandments’
Charlton Heston would’ve celebrated his 95th birthday on October 4, 2018. Born in 1923, the actor became a household name with leading roles in action adventures and biblical epics. But his credits extended past those two well-worn genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

After serving in the United States Army Air Force during WWII, Heston made his professional movie acting debut with the film noir “Dark City” (1950). His big breakthrough came just two years later with Cecil B. DeMille‘s big top soap opera “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952), in which he played the circus manager. Though an audience favorite in its time, the film often ranks among the all-time worst Oscar winners for Best Picture.

Heston later reunited with DeMille to play the Old Testament prophet Moses in “The Ten Commandments” (1956), which brought him a Golden Globe nomination.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Charlton Heston movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Charlton Heston movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Charlton Heston would’ve celebrated his 95th birthday on October 4, 2018. Born in 1923, the actor became a household name with leading roles in action adventures and biblical epics. But his credits extended past those two well-worn genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

After serving in the United States Army Air Force during WWII, Heston made his professional movie acting debut with the film noir “Dark City” (1950). His big breakthrough came just two years later with Cecil B. DeMille‘s big top soap opera “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952), in which he played the circus manager. Though an audience favorite in its time, the film often ranks among the all-time worst Oscar winners for Best Picture.

Heston later reunited with DeMille to play the Old Testament prophet Moses in “The Ten Commandments” (1956), which brought him a Golden Globe nomination.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Q&A: Val Kilmer Talks ‘The Super’ and ‘Top Gun’ Sequel

  • Variety
Q&A: Val Kilmer Talks ‘The Super’ and ‘Top Gun’ Sequel
In his lengthy and varied career, Val Kilmer has played everyone from Jim Morrison to Doc Holliday to Mark Twain – in multiple projects. He’s played Moses in the lavish musical “The Ten Commandments” and voiced Kitt the car in the “Knight Rider” reboot. Along the way, he’s worked with filmmakers from Oliver Stone to Ron Howard and actors from Tom Cruise to Marlon Brando. In short, there’s no pigeonholing the actor who launched his career with broad comedies like “Top Secret!” and “Real Genius” before becoming a household name thanks to “Top Gun” – a role he’ll reprise in the upcoming sequel.

So it’s surprising to hear there’s something Kilmer hasn’t done, but that’s the case with “The Super,” which he says is his first straight-up genre thriller. Based on an idea from and produced by “Law & Order” mastermind Dick Wolf, “The Super
See full article at Variety »

Weather Channel Rolls Out Badass Graphics to Show Hurricane Florence Conditions

  • TMZ
Weather Channel Rolls Out Badass Graphics to Show Hurricane Florence Conditions
The Weather Channel is stepping up its game for Hurricane Florence with some amazing 'Star Wars'-like graphics that have the potential to save hundreds of lives. The new virtual reality view of a hurricane's storm surge debuted Thursday and it's truly impressive. The meteorologist seems like Charlton Heston in "The Ten Commandments" -- surrounded by 9 feet of water, giving viewers a shocking look at the devastation it could cause. On one hand, it's a super cool visual and,
See full article at TMZ »

Podtalk: Media Artist Lana Z. Caplan on Her New Exhibit, ‘Dunites’

Boston, Ma – Meeting Lana Z. Caplan, as I did at the Chicago Underground Film Festival, is to meet a variety of perspective all in one dynamic artist. The veteran “lens based” media visionary has single-channel films, video, interactive installations and photography on her palette. Her latest exhibit – through September 29th, 2918 – is at Gallery Naga in Boston, and it is entitled “Dunites.” The presentation will include photography, video, 35mm slides and a Vr (Virtual Reality) installation, all inspired by the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes south of San Francisco.

This is not the first time Lana Z. Caplan has explored her art through a specific location. Beijing, Maui, Lake Como and the internet has fallen under her gaze, as much of her work “explores the implications of the social landscape on the physical landscape.” She has a Mfa in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art, and is currently an assistant professor at Cal Poly,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Charlton Heston's Wife, Actress Lydia Clarke Heston, Dies at 95

Charlton Heston's Wife, Actress Lydia Clarke Heston, Dies at 95
Actress Lydia Clarke Heston, who was married to late Oscar winner Charlton Heston for 64 years, died Monday. She was 95.

Clarke Heston was known for her roles in Sidney Kingsley’s Detective Story on Broadway, which opened in 1949; her first feature, Atomic City, opposite Gene Barry; and The Greatest Show on Earth, which premiered in 1952 and also starred her husband.

Hailing from Wisconsin, Clarke Heston met Charlton in an acting class at Northwestern University. They married in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1944, before he went overseas to serve in World War II.

In the mid-50s, the mother of two left acting
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Designing Woman, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and The Fosters: Jim Hemphill’s Weekend Blu-Ray and Streaming Picks

By 1957, television was competing with movies in a way that had driven studio films toward the epic widescreen aesthetic of Bridge on the River Kwai and The Ten Commandments, yet the relationship between TV and mainstream cinema was more complex than that of straightforward opposition in terms of style and scale. Although spectacles like those of David Lean and Cecil B. DeMille were designed to draw audiences to theaters for experiences they couldn’t get at home, the fact that older films from the ’30s and ’40s were suddenly accessible on the small screen gave some viewers a thirst for […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Designing Woman, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and The Fosters: Jim Hemphill’s Weekend Blu-Ray and Streaming Picks

By 1957, television was competing with movies in a way that had driven studio films toward the epic widescreen aesthetic of Bridge on the River Kwai and The Ten Commandments, yet the relationship between TV and mainstream cinema was more complex than that of straightforward opposition in terms of style and scale. Although spectacles like those of David Lean and Cecil B. DeMille were designed to draw audiences to theaters for experiences they couldn’t get at home, the fact that older films from the ’30s and ’40s were suddenly accessible on the small screen gave some viewers a thirst for […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Concert Review: Pink Reaches Full Altitude at Spectacular Forum Show

  • Variety
Concert Review: Pink Reaches Full Altitude at Spectacular Forum Show
In the history of traveling pop music outings, there’s probably never been a better first 10 seconds of any tour than the opening of Pink’s current show. After a small eternity in which the audience is left gazing at a reddish curtain, increasingly indented as unknowable pieces of staging are pushed into place, it suddenly drops and the crowd is immediately plunged into a “Get the Party Started” that appears to have already started a few hours earlier. A dozen bits of business are happening with the dancers, musicians and props, but at or hovering over the center of it all is Pink, hanging from a quadruple-scale chandelier that is already deep into pendulum mode.

The waste-no-time audaciousness of opening the show with this “joined already in progress” moment is kind of as if Cecil B. DeMille decided to dispense with preliminaries and start “The Ten Commandments” right as
See full article at Variety »

Clint Walker, Star of TV Western ‘Cheyenne,’ Dies at 90

  • Variety
Clint Walker, Star of TV Western ‘Cheyenne,’ Dies at 90
Clint Walker, who starred in the television Western “Cheyenne” and had a key supporting role in the WWII film “The Dirty Dozen,” died on Monday in Northern California, according to the New York Times. He was 90.

For seven seasons from 1955-61, he played Cheyenne Bodie, a rambunctious wanderer in the post-Civil War West, on the ABC series “Cheyenne.” (He also guested as the character on “Maverick.”)

The actor’s seriocomic confrontation with star Lee Marvin was one of the highlights of the classic 1967 war picture “The Dirty Dozen.”

After “Cheyenne” ended, Walker made some guest appearances on TV — “77 Sunset Strip,” “Kraft Suspense Theatre” and “The Lucy Show,” in an episode called “Lucy and Clint Walker.”

But the actor became more interested in movies both theatrical and for TV. In 1964, he had a supporting role in the Doris Day-Rock Hudson comedy “Send Me No Flowers.” His acting was not distinguished,
See full article at Variety »

Clint Walker Dies: TV’s ‘Cheyenne’ Star & One Of The Dirty Dozen Was 90

Clint Walker Dies: TV’s ‘Cheyenne’ Star & One Of The Dirty Dozen Was 90
Clint Walker, the hulking star of TV’s Cheyenne who also appeared in such classic films as The Ten Commandment and The Dirty Dozen, died Monday. He was 90. Walker’s daughter Valerie told TMZ that the family believes he died from a heart problem.

Walker was best known for playing Cheyenne Bodie, the strapping, brooding, mean title drifter in the 1955-63 ABC Western Cheyenne. Roaming from town to town and job to job in the post-Civil War West. The series did a slow build, breaking into the year-end Primetime Top 25 at No. 12 in its third season, where it peaked amid the crush of Western fare.

Around then, a contract beef with producer Warner Bros led Walker to quit the show. The studio replaced him with an unknown actor — Ty Hardin, who would go on to star in Bronco — but Walker returned in early 1959 and finished out the series’ seven-season run.
See full article at Deadline »

'Cheyenne' Star Clint Walker Dead at 90

  • TMZ
'Cheyenne' Star Clint Walker Dead at 90
11:15 Am Pt -- Clint's daughter, Valerie, tells us Walker died from congestive heart failure.Clint Walker -- best known for playing a TV cowboy on the hit western series "Cheyenne" -- has died ... TMZ has learned. Clint died suddenly Monday in the company of his wife and daughter ... according to a source close to the family. It's still unclear what caused his death, but a family member says they believed it was a heart issue.
See full article at TMZ »

O The Choices I Have! A 2018 Tcmff Preamble

So much time, so few movies to see. Scratch that. Reverse it.

Running a little later than usual this year, the 2018 Turner Classic Movies Film Festival gets under way this coming Thursday, screening approximately 88 films and special programs over the course of the festival’s three-and-a-half days, beginning Thursday evening, and no doubt about it, this year’s schedule, no less than any other year, will lay out a banquet for classic film buffs, casual film fans and harder-core cinephiles looking for the opportunity to see long-time favorites as well as rare and unusual treats on the big screen. I’ve attended every festival since its inaugural run back in 2010, and since then if I have not reined in my enthusiasm for the festival and being given the opportunity to attend it every year, then I have at least managed to lasso my verbiage. That first year I wrote about
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Academy Brings Architect Renzo Piano to N.Y. to Tout Movie Museum Plans

  • Variety
Academy Brings Architect Renzo Piano to N.Y. to Tout Movie Museum Plans
Ninety years after Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford first floated the idea of creating a museum for the movie business, the completion of Hollywood’s first major movie museum is finally nearing. Architect Renzo Piano and officials from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences traveled to Manhattan Monday to preview the project for East Coast press.

After fits and starts, funding headaches and clashing visions, the 300,000-square-foot Academy Museum will open in mid-2019. Its backers, AMPAS, better known as the group that hands the Oscars, promise that the museum will be an immersive experience that will feature everything from screenings to talks to props and items from iconic movies.

“It’s much more than a museum,” said Academy Museum director Kerry Brougher at the Plaza Hotel. “It’s a hub for film lovers…to come and experience film in different ways.”

The museum will cost in excess of
See full article at Variety »

Copyrights Will Expire for 35 Silent Films By Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, and More

Copyrights Will Expire for 35 Silent Films By Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, Buster Keaton, and More
Films by Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, and Buster Keaton are among the “hundreds of thousands” of books, musical scores, and motion pictures that will enter the public domain on January 1, according to The Atlantic. All of the works were first made available to audiences in 1923, four years before the introduction of talkies. Due to changed copyright laws, this will be the largest collection of material to lose its copyright protections since 1998.

Artists looking to incorporate black-and-white era throwbacks into their modern creations will have lots of new options. The Atlantic consulted unpublished research from Duke University School of Law’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, which shared with IndieWire a list of 35 films that will soon become available to all.

“Our list is therefore only a partial one; many more works are entering the public domain as well, but the relevant information to confirm this may
See full article at Indiewire »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Ruby (1977)

Curtis Harrington’s Ruby (1977) is a perfect example of what I like to call a or something film, to wit: Piper Laurie follows up her Academy Award nominated turn in Carrie (’76) to headline as a former gun moll haunted by her dead ex while she runs a drive-in and her 16 year old becomes possessed by said dead ex. Or something. Fractured and scattered but a whole lot of fun, Ruby is positively littered with or something’s and I kind of love it for that.

Released by Dimension Pictures in late June, Ruby was a big hit with audiences, returning $16 million off of a sub million dollar budget. This was clearly the Carrie effect; I remember the trailer playing on TV at the time, and my wee mind was blown by the final image – a woman in a red dress being dragged underwater. For a kid with an early thirst for horror,
See full article at DailyDead »

‘The Prayer’ Is An Austere Yet Accessible Portrait Of The Transformative Power Of Religion [Berlin Review]

Setting aside Bible Belt-targeted dreck, films on faith tend to fall into one of two categories: the austere or the spectacular, “Dekalog” or “The Ten Commandments.” In the running for the Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival, French filmmaker Cédric Kahn’s “The Prayer” doesn’t display the formal rigor of a Kieślowski film but it does accomplish the tricky feat of being simultaneously thoughtful and accessible.
See full article at The Playlist »

A look back at female firsts at the Oscars: Barbra Streisand, Kathryn Bigelow, Emma Thompson …

A look back at female firsts at the Oscars: Barbra Streisand, Kathryn Bigelow, Emma Thompson …
It certainly seems to be the year of the woman at the Academy Awards. Greta Gerwig became just the fifth woman to receive a Best Director Oscar nomination for “Lady Bird.” For the first time in the academy’s 90-year history, a woman, AFI Conservancy alum Rachel Morrison, has been nominated for Best Cinematography for “Mudbound.” And the drama’s director Dee Rees made history as the first black woman to receive a nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay.

The film’s star Mary J. Blige not only received a supporting actress nomination, but she is also nominated for Best Original Song for “Mighty River” from the film, alongside co-writers Raphael Saadiq and Taura Stinson.

But it’s been baby steps for women behind the camera in terms of Oscar nominations, let alone wins.

Here is a look at some of the trailblazers:

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oprah Winfrey Uses Cecil B. DeMille Award to Spotlight #MeToo Movement: ‘A New Day Is on the Horizon’

Oprah Winfrey Uses Cecil B. DeMille Award to Spotlight #MeToo Movement: ‘A New Day Is on the Horizon’
It seemed preordained. On a night when so many members of the entertainment industry came together to make their dedication to female-centric movements like #TimesUp and #MeToo, one of Hollywood’s most prolific pioneers would be on hand to accept the Cecil B. DeMille Award for her massive contributions to the world. Oprah Winfrey was announced as this year’s recipient of the award back in December, but tonight’s speech couldn’t have been more timely.

The HFPA’s version of a Lifetime Achievement award, the Cecil B. DeMille Award is given to recipients for “outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment.” Named after the legendary director of such films as “Cleopatra,” “Samson and Delilah” and “The Ten Commandments,” the award was first given out in 1952 and has been doled out continuously since, save for the 1976 and 2008 ceremonies, where it was not awarded to anyone.

Read More:Golden Globes 2018 Winners
See full article at Indiewire »

National Film Registry Adds ‘Die Hard,’ ‘Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,’ ‘Memento,’ and More Titles to Library of Congress

National Film Registry Adds ‘Die Hard,’ ‘Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,’ ‘Memento,’ and More Titles to Library of Congress
As is annual tradition, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has announced this year’s 25 film set to join the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. Selected for their “cultural, historic and/or aesthetic importance,” the films picked range from such beloved actioners as “Die Hard,” childhood classic “The Goonies,” the seminal “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” and the mind-bending “Memento,” with plenty of other genres and styles represented among the list.

The additions span 1905 to 2000, and includes Hollywood blockbusters, documentaries, silent movies, animation, shorts, independent, and even home movies. The 2017 selections bring the number of films in the registry to 725.

“The selection of a film to the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to American cinema and the nation’s cultural and historical heritage,” Hayden said in an official statement. “Our love affair with motion pictures is a testament to their enduring power to enlighten, inspire and
See full article at Indiewire »
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