7.5/10
1,407
17 user 8 critic

The Forty-First (1956)

Sorok pervyy (original title)
An unexpected romance occurs for a female Red Army sniper and a White Army officer.

Director:

Grigoriy Chukhray

Writers:

Grigoriy Koltunov (as G. Koltunov), Boris Lavrenyev (novel)
Reviews
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Izolda Izvitskaya ... Soldier Maria Filatovna
Oleg Strizhenov ... Lieutenant Vadim Nikolayevich Govorkha, Jr.
Nikolay Kryuchkov ... Commander Ansenti Yevsyukov
Nikolai Dupak ... Soldier Andrei Chupilko (as N. Dupak)
Georgi Shapovalov ... Soldier Terentyev (as G. Shapovalov)
Pyotr Lyubeshkin ... (as P. Lyubeshkin)
L. Kovylin L. Kovylin ... Soldier Kovylin
Yu. Romanov Yu. Romanov ... Soldier Vyakhir
Daniil Netrebin ... Soldier Semyannin (as D. Netrebin)
Asanbek Umuraliyev ... Soldier Umankul (as A. Umuraliev)
Anatoli Kokorin Anatoli Kokorin ... Soldier Yegorov (as A. Kokorin)
Vadim Sinitsyn Vadim Sinitsyn ... Wounded soldier (as V. Sinitsyn)
Kirey Zharkimbayev ... Timerkul (as K. Zharkimbayev)
T. Sardarbekova T. Sardarbekova ... Altynai, village girl
Vadim Zakharchenko ... (as V. Zakharchenko)
Edit

Storyline

A detachment of the Red Army led by Commissar Yevsyukov is moving along the sands of the Central Asian desert, pursued by whites, dying of thirst. Forty killed officers were on the battle account of the best shooter of the Maryutka detachment. In the last battle to capture the caravan, the white lieutenant Govorukha-Otrok was taken prisoner, sent on a diplomatic mission from Admiral Kolchak to General Denikin. The soldiers are trying to return to their own, fighting the hostile desert. Finally, they go to the coast of the Aral Sea, where Maria, Govorukha-Otrok and several fighters take a boat to reach the mainland. All Red Army soldiers die during a storm, and Maria and Lieutenant are thrown alone on the island. Written by Peter-Patrick76 (peter-patrick@mail.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

War | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Remake of Sorok pervyy (1927) See more »

User Reviews

 
The ending will haunt you forever
14 August 2006 | by FpiSee all my reviews

Much can be said about the range of emotions found in today's movies. They've certainly become better at promoting a cool atmosphere, adrenaline rushes, making plots that are cleverly built up to a climax, and fitting in as many square centimetres of skin as possible into the film. Some emotions are, however, totally, and I mean totally, disregarded. Intense melancholy, an intense sense of longing and sensations of intense pity for the characters are now nowhere to be found. This movie has all of that in spades, making it radically different from today's European and American movies. It is more "theatrical" than today's more "realistic" films, but for God's sake, don't let that put you off. An incessantly beautiful soundtrack sweeps through the entire film, and the pictures are stunningly beautiful, though in a Russian way that can simply be labelled "different". This film was an eye-opener to the fact that I've seen so many movies that ultimately have left me nearly indifferent to the fate of the characters, and to some loose theory that melancholy and pity are closely related. Everyone should hunt this movie down. The ending will haunt you forever. Anything you watch afterwards will seem like ridiculous attempts to give you cheap thrills.


46 of 51 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 17 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

Russian

Release Date:

15 October 1956 (Soviet Union) See more »

Also Known As:

The Forty-First See more »

Filming Locations:

Mosfilm Studios, Moscow, Russia

Company Credits

Production Co:

Mosfilm See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed