An ex-soldier faces ethical questions as he tries to earn enough to support his wife and children well.

Director:

Nunnally Johnson

Writers:

Nunnally Johnson (screenplay), Sloan Wilson (novel)
Reviews
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gregory Peck ... Tom Rath
Jennifer Jones ... Betsy Rath
Fredric March ... Ralph Hopkins
Marisa Pavan ... Maria Montagne
Lee J. Cobb ... Judge Bernstein
Ann Harding ... Helen Hopkins
Keenan Wynn ... Sgt. Caesar Gardella
Gene Lockhart ... Bill Hawthorne
Gigi Perreau ... Susan Hopkins
Portland Mason Portland Mason ... Janey Rath
Arthur O'Connell ... Gordon Walker
Henry Daniell ... Bill Ogden
Connie Gilchrist ... Mrs. Manter
Joseph Sweeney Joseph Sweeney ... Edward M. Schultz
Sandy Descher ... Barbara Rath
Edit

Storyline

Tom Rath lives in Connecticut and commutes to work every day in Manhattan. He's happily married and has a loving wife and three children. Money is a bit tight and when the opportunity arises, he applies for a public relations job with a major television network. During his long commute to work everyday, Tom reminisces about the war. Although 10 years have gone by, he is still haunted by the violence and the men he killed. He also thinks of Maria, an Italian girl with whom he had an affair while stationed in Rome. At his new job, the head of the network Ralph Hopkins takes an immediate liking to him. Tom soon realizes that he will have to choose between becoming a wholly dedicated company man or maintaining a healthy work-life balance. When he learns that Maria gave birth to his son after he left Italy, he decides to let his wife know and ensure that the boy is cared for. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

His loves...his world---both past and present---and the crisis they caused! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The trailer for 1957's "Peyton Place" used Bernard Herrmann's music from the soundtrack of "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit". When Peyton Place was finally released, it had a score by Franz Waxman. See more »

Goofs

As Betsy is driving Tom home from the train at the beginning of the film, the car doesn't correctly respond to how she moves the steering wheel. See more »

Quotes

Judge Bernstein: [referring to a man who is trying to cheat Tom Rath out of his home] If you're going to be slick, be slick in the city. They're not as smart there.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Once it fades in, the 20th Century Fox logo (set to the film's dramatic opening credits music, rather than the traditional Fox fanfare) appears in a slightly smaller CinemaScope windowbox, slowly panning to normal size (correctly fitting the CinemaScope screen) before fadeout. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Monk: Mr. Monk Buys a House (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

(I'm a) Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech
(1908) (uncredited)
Lyrics by Billy Walthall
Music by Frank Roman and Mike Greenblatt
based on "Son of a Gambolier"
Music by Charles Ives (1895)
Played on the ukulele by Gregory Peck
See more »

User Reviews

A salient commentary on the American executive lifestyle
22 October 1999 | by MissRosaSee all my reviews

I was pleased to get a chance to see this movie -- at least half of it -- during a bout of insomnia. The title was a catchphrase for corporate America for many, many years, a kind of symbol for overachieving, aggressive, ambitious businessmen without principles -- in other words, the "suits."

Though I am generally wary of Gregory Peck's (and Jennifer Jones') tendency to niceness, I was impressed by their work here. Their relationship was both substantial and subtle. Jennifer Jones had much much more humanity and integrity than the average housewife portrayed in other films of the 50s and 60s. Peck's character respected her opinions and values.

But I was knocked out by Fredric March. His type A, workaholic executive was touching on many levels. His utter tiredness, alcoholic puffiness, and innate sadness was plastered over with a Willy Loman-like veneer of gung-ho, jolly-good-fellow false heartiness. How familiar that character was and is -- in real life. His ambition, greed and drive had become a habit, and like any junky, he was simply unable to quit. Despite the human losses. I will never forget the scene in his office, when his wife calls him up, and he slowly hangs up the phone.

A very fine film, with many truths about our national character and obsessions....


66 of 71 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 76 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian | German

Release Date:

8 May 1956 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$2,670,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed