The Conqueror (1956) - News Poster

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How The Film “The Conqueror” is Responsible for John Wayne’s Death

John Wayne might have lived an extraordinary and, in some cases, devil-may-care kind of lifestyle, but it’s been the belief that one film, The Conqueror, was responsible for his eventual demise. Whether that’s true or not is kind of irrelevant since it would obviously be seen as a contributing factor at the very least. The Conqueror was filmed in southwestern Utah, and it’s believed that the leftover radiation from the nuclear testing sites in southeastern Nevada were responsible for poisoning the cast and crew of the film as they were shooting. 91 individuals, including John Wayne, were on the set

How The Film “The Conqueror” is Responsible for John Wayne’s Death
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Politically Incorrect Oscars: White Actors Recognized for Playing Minorities

After two straight years of all-white acting nominees in 2015 and 2016, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences responded to the #OscarsSoWhite issue by inviting a far more diverse and younger field of talent both behind and in front of the camera to join. And though there are miles to go until there is true diversity, the academy’s nominees and winners are beginning to reflect our culture.

Last year, “Moonlight” became the first Best Picture winner with an all-black cast. Its director Barry Jenkins shared the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar with Tarell Alvin McCraney, while Mahershala Ali won Best Supporting Actor. Viola Davis also took home Best Supporting Actress for “Fences.”

This year’s black nominees include Jordan Peele, a triple nominee for producing, directing and writing Best Picture contender “Get Out,” which also scored a Best Actor nomination for Daniel Kaluuya. Two-time winner Denzel Washington is nominated for “Roman J.
See full article at Gold Derby »

The politically incorrect Oscars: 9 white actors who were recognized for playing minorities

After two straight years of all-white acting nominees in 2015 and 2016, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences responded to the #OscarsSoWhite issue by inviting a far more diverse and younger field of talent both behind and in front of the camera to join. And though there are miles to go until there is true diversity, the academy’s nominees and winners are beginning to reflect our culture.

Last year, “Moonlight” became the first Best Picture winner with an all-black cast. Its director Barry Jenkins shared the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar with Tarell Alvin McCraney, while Mahershala Ali won Best Supporting Actor. Viola Davis also took home Best Supporting Actress for “Fences.”

This year’s black nominees include Jordan Peele, a triple nominee for producing, directing and writing Best Picture contender “Get Out,” which also scored a Best Actor nomination for Daniel Kaluuya. Two-time winner Denzel Washington is nominated for “Roman J.
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Sea Chase

John Wayne plays a German sea captain in a film that goes out of its way to create a favorable image of our former enemy, with hardly a Nazi flag or even a German accent in sight. Wayne and his co-star Lana Turner are as Teutonic as Blondie and Dagwood, yet the film works as a basic adventure – we like the charismatic star, and the sea chase format guarantees extra interest.

The Sea Chase

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1955 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 117 min. / Street Date July 11, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: John Wayne, Lana Turner, David Farrar, Lyle Bettger, Tab Hunter, James Arness, Richard Davalos, John Qualen, Paul Fix, Alan Hale Jr., Peter Whitney, Claude Akins, John Doucette, Tudor Owen, Adam Williams.

Cinematography: William Clothier

Film Editors: William Ziegler, Owen Marks

Original Music: Roy Webb

Written by James Warner Bellah, John Twist from a novel by Andrew Geer

Produced and Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "The Conqueror" (1956) Starring John Wayne And Susan Hayward; Universal Vault DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Doug Oswald

Released as a burn-to-order DVD from the Universal Vault Series, some may be quick to add that they should have kept “The Conqueror” in the vault. The movie is notorious for being one of the worst movies in Hollywood history. Much has been written about how terrible this movie is so I’m going to avoid jumping on that bandwagon. After all, calling this movie bad is like calling out water for being wet.

The movie is also a part of a conspiracy theory of sorts because many of the cast and crew died from cancer and some have connected those cancer deaths to the location filming in St. George Utah which was the stand-in for the Gobi Desert. St. George is downwind from where the above ground nuclear testing occurred in Nevada. Indeed, many involved with this movie did succumb to cancer including lifetime smoker John Wayne
See full article at CinemaRetro »

19 ambitious movies that didn't go to plan

Andrew Blair Jan 30, 2017

Sometimes, the best of intentions don't always lead to the best movie. Here are 19 films where everything didn't quite go to plan...

As Alan Parker said ‘no one sets out to make a bad film’. Yet in spite of good intentions, sometimes a project doesn't quite go to plan. We're going to look at a bunch of movies here that aren't always well liked, and give a flavour of the problems the beset them.

So, in no particular order, here are twenty of the films that have ever been made, which are considered by at least one sentient being to be bad. That's not the interesting thing about them....

Robin Hood (2010)

Ethan Reiff and Cyrus Voris had written a spec script with a twist on the Robin Hood legend: the Sheriff of Nottingham was the hero, a sort of medieval forensic investigator, and Robin was the bad guy.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Today in Movie Culture: J.J. Abrams Fixes More Franchises, Presidential Nominees as Best Picture Nominees and More

  • Movies.com
Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Movie Characters in Real Life: Deadpool exists on the edges of the movie world and the real world, and he (via actor Ryan Reynolds) offered up a Nsfw response to a petition to get the character to host Saturday Night Live:   Filmmaker Parody of the Day: J.J. Abrams has already repaired the Star Trek and Star Wars franchises. Now he's on to The Matrix, Indiana Jones, Saw and more:   Vintage Image of the Day: John Wayne looks upon a geiger counter on the set of The Conqueror, which opened 60 years ago today. The film was shot on a nuclear test site, which is said to be the blame for the deaths of Wayne and much of the rest of the cast and...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

John Oliver Slams Hollywood’s Whitewashing Practices

John Oliver Slams Hollywood’s Whitewashing Practices
Sunday night’s episode of John Oliver’s “Last Week Tonight” took aim at Hollywood’s whitewashing epidemic — one week before the 88th Academy Awards.

The scathing, four-minute segment — titled “How Is This Still a Thing?” — highlighted a disturbing practice as old as the industry itself: casting white actors to play non-white characters. While this year’s #OscarsSoWhite controversy, which came to light when the Academy nominated only white actors in the four acting categories for the second year in a row, focused on the lack of recognition and the lack of opportunities for people of color, the “Last Week” segment suggests that the roles are out there, they’re just played by white actors.

“That’s right — Jake Gyllenhaal, a white American with a Swedish last name, was cast to play the ‘Prince of Persia’ from, you know, Persia,” said a voiceover. “And he’s far from alone. Just last year,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Oliver Slams Hollywood’s Whitewashing Practices

John Oliver Slams Hollywood’s Whitewashing Practices
Sunday night’s episode of John Oliver’s “Last Week Tonight” took aim at Hollywood’s whitewashing epidemic — one week before the 88th Academy Awards.

The scathing, four-minute segment — titled “How Is This Still a Thing?” — highlighted a disturbing practice as old as the industry itself: casting white actors to play non-white characters. While this year’s #OscarsSoWhite controversy, which came to light when the Academy nominated only white actors in the four acting categories for the second year in a row, focused on the lack of recognition and the lack of opportunities for people of color, the “Last Week” segment suggests that the roles are out there, they’re just played by white actors.

“That’s right — Jake Gyllenhaal, a white American with a Swedish last name, was cast to play the ‘Prince of Persia’ from, you know, Persia,” said a voiceover. “And he’s far from alone. Just last year,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

5 Crazy-Dangerous Film Sets

  • newser
Making a movie isn't always all fun and games. Pixable rounds up nine film locations that were extremely hazardous for cast and crew: The Conqueror , St. George, Utah: The 1956 John Wayne flick was filmed near a government nuclear test site in Nevada. Nearly 100 cast and crew members ultimately got some form of cancer, including Wayne (though he attributed his cancer to his six-pack-a-day smoking habit). Noah's Ark, Chatsworth, Calif.: The 1982 short film used so much water for the flooding scene the set actually flooded and people were injured. Thirty-five ambulances responded to the emergency. Roar , Acton, Calif....
See full article at newser »

Omar Sharif Remembered: From Egypt to Hollywood, a Chameleon of the Screen

Omar Sharif Remembered: From Egypt to Hollywood, a Chameleon of the Screen
There is a shot in “Doctor Zhivago” in which Omar Sharif’s face is almost entirely veiled in shadow, so that all we see are his eyes, focused on the woman who will soon become his lover. For all the visual sweep of David Lean’s magnificently mushy 1965 romance, it contains few images as telling or revealing as this one: Here were eyes for the audience to lose itself in, but also to study closely. The film historian and professor Constantine Santas summed it up in his appreciative 2011 study of Lean’s epics, when he wrote that Sharif’s Zhivago “is frequently described as ‘passive,’ his eyes reflecting the reality he sees in reaction shots; his eyes then become the mirror of reality we ourselves see.”

It’s a conceit that could only work, of course, if your leading man had the eyes to do it justice. And Lean, the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hollywood and the downwinders still grapple with nuclear fallout

The Us turned swathes of desert radioactive during the cold war and denied it, bequeathing a medical mystery that still haunts Hollywood and rural Mormon communities and raises the question: how much do you trust the government?

The photograph shows John Wayne with his two sons during a break in filming on the set of The Conqueror, a big budget blockbuster about Genghis Khan shot in the Utah desert in 1954. It was one of Hollywood’s most famous mis-castings. The duke could do many things but playing a 13th century Mongol warlord was not one of them. Film geeks consider it one of the great turkeys of Hollywood’s golden age.

There is another, darker reason it endures in film lore. The photograph hints at it. Wayne clutches a black metal box while another man appears to adjust the controls. Wayne’s two teenage sons, Patrick and Michael, gaze at it,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ten Miscastings That Worked – or Nearly Worked!

Miscasting in films has always been a problem. A producer hires an actor thinking that he or she is perfect for a movie role only to find the opposite is true. Other times a star is hired for his box office draw but ruins an otherwise good movie because he looks completely out of place.

There have been many humdinger miscastings. You only have to laugh at John Wayne’s Genghis Khan (with Mongol moustache and gun-belt) in The Conqueror (1956), giggle at Marlon Brando’s woeful upper class twang as Fletcher Christian in Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) and cringe at Dick Van Dyke’s misbegotten cockney accent in Mary Poppins (1964). But as hilarious as these miscastings are, producers at the time didn’t think the same way, until after the event. At least they add a bit of camp value to a mediocre or downright awful movie.

In rare cases,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Academy Receives Gift Documenting Career of Costume Designer Michael Woulfe

Academy Receives Gift Documenting Career of Costume Designer Michael Woulfe
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has received a gift of costume design drawings and related production materials documenting the career of costume designer Michael Woulfe. Woulfe's career highlights include work on such films as Clash by Night (1952), The French Line (1953), Son of Sinbad (1955) and The Conqueror (1956). He was known for styling actresses such as Judy Garland, Jane Russell and Jean Simmons, and for designing the employee uniforms for four Las Vegas hotels and casinos owned by Howard Hughes, as well as the costumes for the Las Vegas nightclub shows of Debbie Reynolds, Lena

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Welles, Wood, and Zadora: Greatest Bad Movies Ever?

From John Travolta to Bob Dylan, from Ed Wood to Orson Welles: ‘The Greatest Bad Movies of All Time’ (photo: John Travolta in the Scientology-inspired movie ‘Battlefield Earth’) Phil Hall’s The Greatest Bad Movies of All Time, tagged as a "new celebration of cinematic inanity," was published by Bear Manor on August 12, 2013. According to the book’s press release, the Greatest Bad Movies "are the films that inspire wonder" — of a unique variety: "You are left wondering how seemingly intelligent people could gather together and spend money to create such bizarre productions." According to Phil Hall, among the most wonder-inspiring movies ever made are John Travolta’s Roger Christian-directed Scientology-inspired megabomb Battlefield Earth; John Huston’s sort of The Maltese Falcon send up Beat the Devil, starring Humphrey Bogart, Jennifer Jones, and Gina Lollobrigida; Robert Altman’s Health, featuring a classy cast that includes Glenda Jackson, James Garner,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hollywood's 12 Worst Cases of Ethnic Miscasting

When it was first announced that this week's "The Lone Ranger" was going to star Johnny Depp as the Native American warrior Tonto, fans around the country scratched their heads ... and not just because they were wondering what he would look like with a giant dead bird for a hat. Depp as Tonto? Really?

Depp, as it turns out, does have some Native American ancestry and was recently adopted by the Comanche nation. But his role as Tonto and the subsequent casting of William Fichtner as the Japanese villain Shredder in "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" did get us thinking about one of the most insidious aspects of Hollywood's moviemaking machine: namely, their ongoing insensitivity and downright obliviousness when it comes to casting ethnic characters.

So with that in mind, here's a look at some of the most egregious examples. Because the only color that seems to matter in Hollywood is green.
See full article at NextMovie »

The Conqueror: Hollywood gives Genghis Khan a kicking he won't forget

As if the film's dodgy dialogue and Dr Seuss suits weren't insult enough – casting John Wayne in the lead role really put the cowboy boot in the Mongol warrior's legacy

The Conqueror (1956)

Director: Dick Powell

Entertainment grade: D–

History grade: D+

Genghis Khan founded the Mongol Empire in the 12th century.

Casting

The Conqueror was written for Marlon Brando, but he dodged it thanks to his contract with another studio. Meanwhile, John Wayne was at the peak of his career – he made The Searchers soon afterwards – and producer Howard Hughes was inclined to give him whatever he wanted. What he wanted, apparently, was to be a 12th-century Mongolian warlord. Well, who doesn't? This is how one of the worst casting decisions of all time was made, and John Wayne became Genghis Khan.

Dialogue

The film opens with Temujin, as Genghis was originally known, intercepting a wedding procession of Merkits. No,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Wayne Almost Played Lawrence Of Arabia!

  • CinemaRetro
 

Would you buy a used camel from this man?

Brian Hannan, author of the new book The Making of Lawrence of Arabia, has unveiled a startling fact: an early production of David Lean's masterpiece was announced in January 1953- a decade before Lean's version was released. It was to be filmed in Cinerama and star John Wayne! Now, there are no bigger fans of the Duke than us, but what were they thinking? Fortunately, plans fell apart for this particular film. Hannan relates how Marlon Brando was Lean's first choice for the role, so even in saner hands the emphasis was in casting an American actor as the iconic Brit. By the way, Duke Wayne may have dodged a bullet with Lawrence, but a few years later he went one worse by playing Genghis Khan in The Conqueror! For more click here 
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Never mind Iran and Argo, the Brits should sue Hollywood | Alex von Tunzelmann

Tehran's Hoax of Hollywood conference sets a precedent that other countries could follow. Let's start with Braveheart

Following the Iranian Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance's Hoax of Hollywood conference in Tehran this week, it has been reported that Iran may "sue Hollywood" over what it considers to be unrealistic portrayals of the country in several films. The most recent offender is Ben Affleck's Argo, based on the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-1981 and winner of this year's best picture Oscar. Others named include 300, The Wrestler and Not Without My Daughter.

The representation of Iran in Argo is certainly questionable but, as when the Kazakhstan foreign ministry threatened to sue over Borat, the prospect of a lawsuit doesn't seem entirely realistic. Do nations or governments have a right to accurate representation in fiction? In what jurisdiction could such a case be brought? Wouldn't there be some sort of statute of limitation on suing over,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

5 Movies That Were Incredibly Self-Indulgent

All filmmakers have their magnum opus – a production that’s deeply personal to them, and one that they’re immensely proud of. Francis Ford Coppola had The Godfather, George Lucas had Star Wars, Martin Scorsese had Taxi Driver. The list goes on and on.

But how good that magnum opus may turn out to be depends on various factors, one of which is the person behind it not being a self-indulgent jackass who puts their ego ahead of everything else. These films are examples of when that didn’t happen…

5. The Conqueror (1956, Dir. Dick Powell)

Actors playing characters of different races to themselves can have varying degrees of success. It can be amazing like Liam Neeson in Schindler’s List, it can be pretty unconvincing like Anne Hathaway in One Day, or in the case of John Wayne in The Conqueror, it can be astoundingly bad and monumentally stupid. Why?
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