7.4/10
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77 user 39 critic

Baby Doll (1956)

Approved | | Comedy, Drama | 29 December 1956 (USA)
Trailer
3:00 | Trailer
A child bride holds her husband at bay while flirting with a sexy Italian farmer.

Director:

Elia Kazan

Writer:

Tennessee Williams (screenplay)
Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Karl Malden ... Archie Lee Meighan
Carroll Baker ... Baby Doll Meighan
Eli Wallach ... Silva Vacarro
Mildred Dunnock ... Aunt Rose Comfort
Lonny Chapman ... Rock
Eades Hogue Eades Hogue ... Town Marshal
Noah Williamson Noah Williamson ... Deputy
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Storyline

Living in Tiger Tail County, Mississippi, middle aged Archie Lee Meighan and nineteen year old "Baby Doll" Meighan née McCargo have been married for close to two years. Their marriage is not based on love, but each getting what they want from the other. Their marriage agreement has them consummating their marriage on her twentieth birthday, which is in three days, the act to which Baby Doll is not really looking forward. But she does taunt him and other men with her overt "baby doll" sexuality, the baby doll aspect which she fosters by sleeping in their house's nursery in a crib. Baby Doll's now deceased father allowed the marriage on the stipulation that Archie Lee provide Baby Doll financial security as displayed by the most resplendent house in the south. They currently live in a dilapidated mansion with her Aunt Rose Comfort, and although Archie Lee is making some renovations on it, he no longer has the financial means to make it what Baby Doll wants as his cotton ginning ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

She's nineteen. She's married two years -- quite a girl -- and not quite a woman... See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Elia Kazan hired identical twin brothers Richard Sylbert and Paul Sylbert (born April 16, 1928) as his scenic designers and art directors. They shared the film's art director credit. The Sylbert twins had primarily been working in NYC live television as IATSE #829 scenic designers and set decorators. They had Kazan hire their fellow New York City CBS television studio set decorator Gene Callahan, who joined Kazan and the Sylbert twins in Benoit, MS, to scout locations and prep the film's primary plantation house location. Consulting and working with Kazan, Gene and the Sylbert twins shared their film designing duties. Originally from Louisiana, Callahan seemed the perfect choice to decorate the squalid, run-down plantation house interiors and plantation site exteriors. He found the "baby doll" iron bed in a local antique shop, which became a featured prop in the film's set and playbill advertisements. The Sylbert twins and Callahan were always on the set with Kazan and his cinematographer, during cast/camera rehearsal blocking shot, subsequent filming, on every set up. This was a natural condition to a television art department team, being a part of the cast and crew rehearsal and filming schedule, day and night. When not with the film crew, they would be preparing the next scene/film shot for the company move. Upon completion of the Mississippi filming, Callahan took the "iron baby doll bed" back with him to New York City, placing it in his spacious and large West Side apartment's living room, a conversation piece! Kazan relied on Callahan's Southern upbringing and scene interpretation in his rehearsals and scene motivation. This professional film relationship and experience secured the Sylberts' and Callahan's future alliance with Kazan's creative film assignments. Kazan took Callahan to Istanbul (Turkey) and Athens (Greece) as his production designer for America America (1963). Callahan won the 1963 Academy Award for Best Art Direction Black-and-White for his painstakingly accurate scenic set designs. See more »

Goofs

Baby Dolls shouts at Silva before reaching for the phone, but her mouth doesn't move. See more »

Quotes

Baby Doll: Hey, drive me along the road with all the windows open to cool me off!
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Connections

Referenced in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

Shame, Shame, Shame
(uncredited)
Written by Kenyon Hopkins and Ruby Fisher
Sung by Smiley Lewis
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User Reviews

 
Buy Arkansas
17 July 2006 | by krorieSee all my reviews

This is a hilarious farce by Tennessee Williams, containing much self-parody. On one level, it can even be interpreted as a burlesque of his "A Streetcar Named Desire." "Stella!" becomes "Baby Doll!" If one cannot imagine the great dramatic playwright writing comedy, then this is the film to see.

Even the story is a mockery. A foolish old man, Archie Lee Meighan (Karl Malden), pretending to be a Southern gentleman, with a rundown plantation and a cotton gin, tricks another old man into letting him marry his comely teenage daughter, Baby Doll (Caroll Baker). He promises to renovate the old farm for Baby Doll and to buy her the world. She agrees if he swears not to touch her until her twentieth birthday. The foolish old man quickly becomes a laughing stock to both blacks and whites who live in the small community in the delta region (there's a sham sign posted in the general store that reads, "Buy Arkansas"). To insure his hold on the rather worldly, not so innocent Baby Doll, Archie Lee burns down his competitor's cotton gin. His competitor, a Sicilian named Silva Vacarro (Eli Wallach), becomes Baby Doll's Latin lover to get back at Archie Lee.

There are several memorable scenes in Elia Kazan's direction of Tennessee William's screenplay. The one that is most remembered because it created such a moral outrage at the time (even Baby Doll pajamas were marketed) shows Baby Doll lying in a baby crib, scantly clad in, what else?, baby doll pajamas, sucking her thumb and arousing all sorts of erotic sensations in the male observer. Another scene is one of the most laughable ever put on the big screen. Picture if you will Eli Wallach riding a hobby horse like a wild stallion while slurping lemonade from a pitcher, listening to "Shame, Shame, Shame" by Smiley Lewis on the record player. This is part of the mad Sicilian's seduction of Baby Doll in the most childish way conceivable, ultimately falling asleep in her baby crib with Baby Doll intoning to him a lullaby.

In classical dramas, tragedies naturally had tragic endings and comedies had happy endings. Tennesee Williams' travesty doesn't exactly have a happy ending, but it's not a tragic ending either, more of a postponement of things to come.

A personal note: I was twelve when "Baby Doll" opened in my home town in Arkansas. The churches and other so-called decency groups attempted to have it banned. There were even pickets outside the theater. Because of all the hype with pictures of Baby Doll flooding the media, I had to finagle a way to see it. Those under thirteen had to be accompanied by an adult (this was before the MPAA ratings system was developed--the PCA was beginning to bend its strict rules as American mores were changing. I mislead my dad, who paid little attention to movie previews, into thinking it was suitable for the general public. My dad attended the film with me and seemed to enjoy it as much as I did. He never told my mother about either one of us watching it.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

29 December 1956 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Twenty-Seven Wagon Loads of Cotton See more »

Filming Locations:

Benoit, Mississippi, USA See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$2,300,000
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Newtown Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)| Stereo

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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