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Where Are They Now: Albert Brenner Went From Window Dressing to Oscar Noms

  • Variety
Growing up among his native Brooklyn’s brick-and-fire-escape facades in the 1930’s, production designer-to-be Albert Brenner often dreamed of the wide open spaces depicted in his favorite Saturday-matinee Westerns. At 16, he landed his first “art job”: dressing windows for a New York City department store.

Two years later, Brenner swapped mannequins for military service and flew in B-24 bombers until World War II ended in 1945. On the G.I. Bill, he attended Yale University, graduating with skills in drafting, and went into summer stock theater under designer Samuel Leve, toiling away on plays like “The Fifth Season” and gaining a union card in the process.

He developed his designer chops in New York on TV shows like “The Phil Silvers Show,” “Car 54, Where Are You?” “Captain Kangaroo” and “Playhouse 90.” His first day on the Silvers show, where he eventually earned $250 a week, was nearly his last, when he
See full article at Variety »

‘Game of Thrones’ dethrones ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ at 2018 Emmys in first head-to-head battle for Best Drama Series

  • Gold Derby
‘Game of Thrones’ dethrones ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ at 2018 Emmys in first head-to-head battle for Best Drama Series
The Best Drama Series category at the 2018 Emmys marked the first head-to-head battle between 2017 champ “The Handmaid’s Tale” and 2015-16 winner “Game of Thrones,” which had been ineligible last year. Turns out Emmy voters much preferred fiery dragons to dystopian handmaids.

Game of Thrones” is now tied at three wins apiece with the 1950s anthology “Playhouse 90,” the 1960s legal drama “The Defenders” and the 1970s period piece “Upstairs, Downstairs.” It could equal the Emmy record of four wins next year as its final season is set to air in the spring. That would put “Game of Thrones” in the company of “Hill Street Blues,” “L.A. Law,” “Mad Men” and “The West Wing.” The success of that latter series meant HBO’s last big drama, “The Sopranos,” only won this race twice.

See Emmys 2018: Watch our live streaming pre-show with final analysis and predictions from 10 Gold Derby contributors
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmy predictions: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is overwhelming favorite to dethrone ‘Game of Thrones’ in first head-to-head battle

  • Gold Derby
Emmy predictions: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is overwhelming favorite to dethrone ‘Game of Thrones’ in first head-to-head battle
This year’s Best Drama Series race has awards pundits on the edge of their seats as it notably showcases the first-ever Emmys face-off between TV’s two most recent winners: “Game of Thrones” claimed victory in 2015 and 2016, but “The Handmaid’s Tale” prevailed last year as “GoT” was ineligible, so they’re both defending champions in a sense. According to Gold Derby’s Emmy predictions, Hulu’s streaming hit will overwhelmingly dethrone HBO’s fantasy epic in their first head-to-head battle, despite “Game of Thrones” earning more trophies (seven) than “Handmaid’s Tale” (three) at last weekend’s Creative Arts Emmys.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” has leading 1/2 odds to win Best Drama Series on Monday night. Of Gold Derby’s 26 Emmy Experts from major media outlets, a whopping 16 of them think the show will win a bookend trophy. In addition, eight of our nine staff Editors think the show will prevail,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Last chance, best chance? ‘The Americans’ could be latest show to win top Emmy for its final season

Last chance, best chance? ‘The Americans’ could be latest show to win top Emmy for its final season
Of the seven Best Drama Series Emmy nominees, only one is competing for the final time: “The Americans.” The espionage drama, which wrapped its six-season run in May, is sitting in third place in our predictions behind frontrunners “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Game of Thrones.” If it manages to pull off the upset, it’d join a small club of shows that won the top prize for its final season.

Logic dictates that voters might want to give a departing series a farewell hug, but that’s a human, real-world response. Emmy voters are quite ruthless and not very sentimental; they hand out the nominations for last chance contenders, but the wins are harder to come by. That’s because they tend to latch onto a series early and keep rewarding it before moving on, so by the time the old favorite ends, they already have a new toy to play with.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tab Hunter Dies: ‘Damn Yankees’ Hollywood Heartthrob Was 86

Tab Hunter Dies: ‘Damn Yankees’ Hollywood Heartthrob Was 86
Tab Hunter, the 1950s epitome of the blond Hollywood heartthrob and teen icon pin-up, whose career included early A-list fare like Damn Yankees! and Battle Cry to later (much later) cult classics Polyester, Lust in the Dust, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman and authorship of a memoir in part describing his life as a closeted gay movie star, has died. He was 86.

Hunter came out as gay with his 2005 autobiography Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star – later the basis for Jeffrey Schwarz’ 2015 Netflix documentary Tab Hunter Confidential – clearing up longstanding Hollywood rumors that. Since his ’80s resurgence in the John Waters and Paul Bartel films costarring Divine, Hunter had relaxed into a more self-amused, even self-deprecating attitude about the vast chasm between the man born Arthur Gelien in 1931 and the teen idol manufactured and rechristened Tab Hunter by Henry Willson, the agent behind such creatively named Hollywood hunks as Rock Hudson,
See full article at Deadline »

Now Casting: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Holding Open Call in NYC + 3 More Gigs

In today’s roundup, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the internationally-acclaimed dance company, is now holding auditions for ongoing New York City and touring performances. Also, a new live drama series for PBS is seeking actors to recreate popular episodes, Microsoft is seeking talent for an internal video, or you can play a Latin beefcake on an hourly drama series. Alvin Ailey American Dance THEATERJoin the internationally-acclaimed Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Professional dancers, aged 18 and older, from all racial and ethnic backgrounds are sought to join the company. Talent must be accomplished in modern, ballet, jazz, Horton, and Dunham techniques. There will be an open casting call in NYC on April 16. Contracts begin in the spring for ongoing NYC and touring performances. Dancers will be paid through affiliation with the American Guild of Musical Artists. Apply here! “Studio 55 Live”Boston Entertainment is now casting “Studio 55 Live,” a live drama
See full article at Backstage »

Emmys 2018: ‘Game of Thrones’ on track to become the 3rd most nominated show for Best Drama Series ever

Emmys 2018: ‘Game of Thrones’ on track to become the 3rd most nominated show for Best Drama Series ever
Game of Thrones” had a long hiatus between seasons six and seven, so it didn’t have any new episodes eligible to compete at the 2017 Emmys. But its seventh season finally aired last summer, so it’s eligible to return to the 2018 Emmy lineup. Given its dominance in previous years, including consecutive victories for Best Drama Series in 2015 and 2016, most of our users predict that it will at least be nominated again in the top category, and if it does it will join an elite list of shows that have been nominated for Best Drama Series seven times.

Seven bids for Best Drama would tie “Game of Thrones” for third place on the list of the most nominated shows in the history of that category. “Studio One” (1951-1956), “ER” (1995-2001), “The Sopranos” (1999-2001, 2003-2004, 2006-2007) and “The West Wing” (2000-2006) also earned seven bids during their runs. And “Game of Thrones
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Best TV Directors of All Time – IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best TV Directors of All Time – IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Who is the best TV director? Why? (For old, current or upcoming shows.)

Marisa Roffman (@marisaroffman), TV Guide Magazine

The recent Emmy Awards was a good reminder of just how great television directors are right now. It was the best overall crop we’ve had in years, and one of the few categories where it felt like it could have gone any way.

But in terms of best television director, I’m partial to David Nutter. His 30-plus year resume is impressive (“The Sopranos,” “ER,” “The X-Files,” plus an Emmy win for “Game of Thrones”) and wildly varied (he’s done procedurals like “Without a Trace,
See full article at Indiewire »

Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part Two: Economics

The 1930s – more films about women, more films about working life. And often the two overlapped. You watch a film made today, it’s brutally clear that the people who made it rarely have to be anywhere In the ‘30s, at the height of the studio system, the entire creative force behind a picture worked 9-5 on the studio lot, just like anyone else. They had a workplace. And while many made a great deal more money than the characters they were depicting, they knew what it was to hold a job. That mindset, that constant awareness of money and office work and routine, bleeds into the pictures of the period.

Take a film like Rafter Romance, which played at TCM Classic Film Festival Friday morning. Ginger Rogers and Norman Foster star as two broke strangers living in the same apartment building (and they say people knew their neighbors back
See full article at CriterionCast »

Newswire: R.I.P. Robert Vaughn, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. star

Robert Vaughn, the star of ’60s spy series The Man From U.N.C.L.E., and an actor who appeared in more than 200 TV shows and films across a 60-year career, has died. Vaughn was 83.

Vaughn’s early resume reads like an encyclopedia of influential ’50s TV shows, with single-episode appearances on everything from Dragnet to Gunsmoke to Playhouse 90. In 1960, he landed his first major film role, playing fearful veteran Lee in John SturgesThe Magnificent Seven. (He played more-or-less the same role 20 years later, for Roger Corman’s Battle Beyond The Stars, and appeared in several episodes of the Magnificent Seven TV show from the late 1990s as well.)

In 1964, Vaughn leveraged his dissatisfaction with the size of his role on NBC’s The Lieutenant into a starring series of his very own. Initially titled Solo—after Vaughn’s character, international enforcer ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Former Child Actor Teddy Rooney, Son of Mickey Rooney, Dies at 66

Former Child Actor Teddy Rooney, Son of Mickey Rooney, Dies at 66
Former child actor Teddy Rooney has died. He was 66. Rooney's sister, Kelly, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter that her brother died on Saturday in a convalescent home in Southern California after a long illness. Teddy was one of late actor Mickey Rooney's nine children. His mother was model and actress Martha Vickers, who was married to Mickey from 1949 - 1951 as his third of eight wives. Rooney acted alongside his mother on an episode of Playhouse 90 in 1957. In addition, he was featured in his father's film Andy Hardy Comes Home in 1958 and General Electric Theater in 1960. Among Rooney's most
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

30 years ago today: ‘Karate Kid II’ showed us the Glory of Love

  • Hitfix
30 years ago today: ‘Karate Kid II’ showed us the Glory of Love
30 years ago today, audiences were treated again to the utterly watchable pair of Daniel and Mr. Miyagi. The Karate Kid, Part II opened in theaters on June 20, 1986. In the sequel, released two years after the original film, Daniel’s wax on, wax off early training days are behind him, and he’s impressively slicing through six blocks of ice. The boy and his mentor travel together to Mr. Miyagi’s home village in Okinawa, Japan. Sparks fly between Daniel and Kumiko, the niece of Mr. Miyagi’s childhood girlfriend, to the synthesizer-tastic tune of “Glory of Love” by Peter Cetera. The song hit the top of the Billboard Hot 100 later that summer and got an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song. Other notable June 20 happenings in pop culture history: • 1948: The Ed Sullivan Show — then titled Toast of the Town — premiered on CBS. Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis performed in that first episode,
See full article at Hitfix »

Piper Laurie: The Hollywood Interview

Piper Laurie Keeps Her Chin Up

By Alex Simon

Few living actors can claim to have experienced the Hollywood machine in all its iterations more than three-time Oscar nominee Piper Laurie. Signed by Universal Pictures at 17, their youngest contract player in years, she was in the last generation that were part of the Hollywood “factory,” pushed into “cheesecake” roles that accented physical attributes, as opposed to talent. It was the beginning of a journey.

She was born Rosetta Jacobs in Detroit, Michigan, on January 22, 1932, to immigrant parents of Polish and Russian Jewish descent. When she was still five, the family sent her and her sister to a children’s sanatorium in the mountains to see if her sister’s asthma could be cured. Three years later after being reunited with her family she decided she wanted to become an actress and studied with Benno and Betomi Schneider for several years
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Review: 'Horace and Pete' concludes as one of the very best dramas you'll see

  • Hitfix
Review: 'Horace and Pete' concludes as one of the very best dramas you'll see
(This column starts off talking about Horace and Pete in relatively general terms, for the benefit of the people who still haven't watched but are curious about sampling it. I'll get to spoilers for the finale midway through, with another warning before that.) Horace and Pete, Louis C.K.'s drama about a Brooklyn bar that's been run by the same family for 100 years, came to an end over the weekend, with even less fanfare than it had on arrival. News of the first episode simply appeared in the inboxes of people on the LouisCK.net email list that just said "Go here to watch it. We hope you like it." Saturday morning, the email read, "I have nothing clever to say. But I would like you very much to know that episode 10 of Horace and Pete is ready right here." That this was going to be the final episode
See full article at Hitfix »

21st-Century TV Artist Louis C.K. Aims High With the Aggressively Classical, Mostly Good Horace and Pete

  • Vulture
21st-Century TV Artist Louis C.K. Aims High With the Aggressively Classical, Mostly Good Horace and Pete
It’s fitting and funny that Louis C.K.’s formal experiments would ultimately take him back in time 60 years, to the age of televised theater: Studio One, Playhouse 90, and the like. Over five seasons, he exhausted most, if not all, of the possibilities of his experimental comedy Louie — including multi-episode arcs that were basically feature films broken into pieces, two of which cast other actors as his same-named alter ego. Now he’s made a series that’s as aggressively classical as a 21st-century TV artist can get. Horace and Pete, the “surprise” series C.K. released last week through his website, is old-school, save for its political and cultural references (super-recent) and its language (profane, of course — this is Louis C.K.). Were it not for C.K.’s roving, zooming camera and the brown-orange sets that echo stagey 1970s sitcoms like All in the Family, Horace and Pete
See full article at Vulture »

Review: "Monte Walsh" (1970) Starring Lee Marvin And Jack Palance; Blu-ray Release From Kino Lorber

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

When the “hardware widow” (Allyn Ann McClerie) asks Monte Walsh (Lee Marvin) if he’d gotten used to the idea of his long-time partner Chet Rollins (Jack Palance) and her being married, Monte says: “I never had so many things to get used to in my whole life, as now.” That line of dialogue in the middle of William Fraker’s “Monte Walsh” (1970) pretty much sums up this first and best film adaptation of Jack Schaeffer’s novel about the end of the Old West in general and the cowboy life in particular. It’s a true classic and even though it features two of the toughest tough guy actors of the sixties and seventies, it’s not a melodramatic shoot-em-up, full of violence, sound and fury. Rather it’s an elegiac portrait of the way it must have really happened, presented in a style as
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Should Emmy Awards revive Best New Series category with likes of 'Empire,' 'Transparent' ...?

Should Emmy Awards revive Best New Series category with likes of 'Empire,' 'Transparent' ...?
The Emmys had a Best New Series category three times in the fifties -- 1953, 1956 and 1957 -- and then from 1970 to 1973. The award went to a mix of Emmy favorites like "Playhouse 90" (1956), "All in the Family" (1971) and "Elizabeth R" (1972). But it's been more than 40 years since that category was last awarded. Should the TV academy bring it back to honor standout shows like "Transparent," "Empire" or "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver"? If so, what series would be nominated and win this year? -Break- We asked our forum posters what they think about a potential Best New Series category. Read some of their comments below, and join them now to let us know what you think. 'Mr. Robot': Rami Malek and Christian Slater star in serious awards contender nkb325: Maybe they could do something like the Critics' Choice Awards and their list of exciting new series &hellip...
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Frankenheimer: A Remembrance

Director John Frankenheimer.

I'm often asked which, out of the over 600 interviews I've logged with Hollywood's finest, is my favorite. It's not a tough answer: John Frankenheimer.

We instantly clicked the day we met at his home in Benedict Canyon, and spent most of the afternoon talking in his den. A friendship of sorts developed over the years, with visits to his office for screenings of the old Kinescopes he directed for shows like "Playhouse 90" during his salad days in live television during the 1950s.

We hadn't spoken for nearly a year in mid-2002 when the phone rang. It was John, who spoke in what can only be described as a "stentorian bark," like a general. "Alex!" he exclaimed. "John Frankenheimer." He could sense something was amiss with me. It was. My screenwriting career had stalled. My marriage was progressing to divorce. I had hit bottom. John knew that
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Actress Betsy Palmer from Friday The 13th Dead at 88

“You see, Jason was my son, and today is his birthday…”

The woman had a long and distinguished career including hundreds of TV appearances in the 1950s and ’60s, but she will always best known as Jason’s mom in the original Friday The 13th (1980). Betsy Palmer was a regular on the horror convention circuit and a good attitude about her place in horror film history. She said in an interview once: “If it was good enough for Boris Karloff, why should I complain?” Betsy Palmer died Friday of natural causes at a hospital in Los Angeles.

From The Associated Press:

Betsy Palmer, the veteran character actress who achieved lasting, though not necessarily sought-after, fame as the murderous camp cook in the cheesy horror film “Friday the 13th,” has died at age 88.

Palmer died Friday of natural causes at a hospice care center in Connecticut, her longtime manager, Brad Lemack,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Pitt Former TV Co-Star Kallsen Dead at 48, Emmy Nominee Meadows dead at 95, Oscar nominee Mankiewicz dead at 93

Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen Brad Pitt 'Glory Days' costar Nicholas Kallsen dead at 48 Nicholas Kallsen, who was featured opposite Brad Pitt in the short-lived television series Glory Days, has died at age 48 in Thailand according to online reports. Their source is one of Rupert Murdoch's rags, citing a Facebook posting by one of the actor's friends. The cause of death was purportedly – no specific source was provided – a drug overdose.* Aired on Fox in July 1990, Glory Days told the story of four high-school friends whose paths take different directions after graduation. Besides Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt, the show also featured Spike Alexander and Evan Mirand. Glory Days lasted a mere six episodes – two of which directed by former Happy Days actor Anson Williams – before its cancellation. Roommates Nicholas Kallsen and Brad Pitt vying for same 'Thelma & Louise' role? The Murdoch tabloid also
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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