8.3/10
12,392
55 user 48 critic

Ordet (1955)

Not Rated | | Drama, Fantasy | 10 January 1955 (Denmark)
Follows the lives of the Borgen family, as they deal with inner conflict, as well as religious conflict with each other, and the rest of the town.

Writer:

Kaj Munk (play)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 6 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Gertrud (1964)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

In the elegant world of artists and musicians, Gertrud ends her marriage to Gustav and takes a lover, the composer Erland Jansson.

Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer
Stars: Nina Pens Rode, Bendt Rothe, Ebbe Rode
Day of Wrath (1943)
Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

The young wife of an aging priest falls in love with his son amidst the horror of a merciless witch hunt in 17th century Denmark.

Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer
Stars: Thorkild Roose, Lisbeth Movin, Sigrid Neiiendam
Vampyr (1932)
Fantasy | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A drifter obsessed with the supernatural stumbles upon an inn where a severely ill adolescent girl is slowly becoming a vampire.

Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer
Stars: Julian West, Maurice Schutz, Rena Mandel
Biography | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

In 1431, Jeanne d'Arc is placed on trial on charges of heresy. The ecclesiastical jurists attempt to force Jeanne to recant her claims of holy visions.

Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer
Stars: Maria Falconetti, Eugene Silvain, André Berley
Balthazar (1966)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

The story of a mistreated donkey and the people around him. A study on saintliness and a sister piece to Bresson's Mouchette.

Director: Robert Bresson
Stars: Anne Wiazemsky, Walter Green, François Lafarge
A Man Escaped (1956)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

A captured French Resistance fighter during WWII engineers a daunting escape from a Nazi prison in France.

Director: Robert Bresson
Stars: François Leterrier, Charles Le Clainche, Maurice Beerblock
Pickpocket (1959)
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Michel is released from jail after serving a sentence for thievery. His mother dies and he resorts to pickpocketing as a means of survival.

Director: Robert Bresson
Stars: Martin LaSalle, Marika Green, Jean Pélégri
L'Atalante (1934)
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Newly married couple Juliette and a ship captain Jean struggle through marriage as they travel on the L'atalante along with the captain's first mate Le père Jules and a cabin boy.

Director: Jean Vigo
Stars: Dita Parlo, Jean Dasté, Gilles Margaritis
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

When a man becomes tyrannical towards his family, the women of the house decide to teach him a lesson in gratitude.

Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer
Stars: Johannes Meyer, Astrid Holm, Karin Nellemose
Ugetsu (1953)
Drama | Fantasy | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

A tale of ambition, family, love, and war set in the midst of the Japanese Civil Wars of the sixteenth century.

Director: Kenji Mizoguchi
Stars: Masayuki Mori, Machiko Kyô, Kinuyo Tanaka
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A young priest taking over the parish at Ambricourt tries to fulfill his duties even as he fights a mysterious stomach ailment.

Director: Robert Bresson
Stars: Claude Laydu, Nicole Ladmiral, Jean Riveyre
Late Spring (1949)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Noriko is twenty-seven years old and still living with her widowed father. Everybody tries to talk her into marrying, but Noriko wants to stay at home caring for her father.

Director: Yasujirô Ozu
Stars: Chishû Ryû, Setsuko Hara, Yumeji Tsukioka
Edit

Cast

Uncredited cast:
Hanne Aagesen Hanne Aagesen ... Karen (uncredited)
Kirsten Andreasen Kirsten Andreasen ... (uncredited)
Sylvia Eckhausen Sylvia Eckhausen ... Kirstin Petersen (uncredited)
Birgitte Federspiel ... Inger Borgen (uncredited)
Ejner Federspiel Ejner Federspiel ... Peter Petersen (uncredited)
Ann Elisabeth Groth Ann Elisabeth Groth ... Maren Borgen (uncredited)
Emil Hass Christensen Emil Hass Christensen ... Mikkel Borgen (uncredited)
Cay Kristiansen Cay Kristiansen ... Anders Borgen (uncredited)
Preben Lerdorff Rye Preben Lerdorff Rye ... Johannes Borgen (uncredited)
Henrik Malberg Henrik Malberg ... Morten Borgen (uncredited)
Gerda Nielsen Gerda Nielsen ... Anne Petersen (uncredited)
Ove Rud Ove Rud ... Pastor (uncredited)
Susanne Rud Susanne Rud ... Lilleinger Borgen (uncredited)
Henry Skjær Henry Skjær ... The Doctor (uncredited)
Edith Trane Edith Trane ... Mette Maren (uncredited)
Edit

Storyline

How do we understand faith and prayer, and what of miracles? August 1925 on a Danish farm. Widowed Patriarch Borgen, who's rather prominent in his community, has three sons: Mikkel, a good-hearted agnostic whose wife Inger is pregnant, Johannes, who believes he is Jesus, and Anders, young, slight, in love with the tailor's daughter. The fundamentalist sect of the girl's father is anathema to Borgen's traditional Lutheranism; he opposes the marriage until the tailor forbids it, then Borgen's pride demands that it happen. Unexpectedly, Inger, who is the family's sweetness and light, has problems with her pregnancy. The rational doctor arrives, and a long night brings sharp focus to at least four views of faith. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

From the creator of "Day of Wrath" See more »

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

Denmark

Language:

Danish

Release Date:

10 January 1955 (Denmark) See more »

Also Known As:

Ordet See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Palladium Film See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The set for the final scene in Carl Th. Dreyer's 1943 film VREDENS DAG was recreated twelve years later for the final scene of his film of this film. As well, actress Birgitte Federspiel was cast as Inger in this version of ORDET because of her facial resemblance to actress Lisbeth Movin as Anne in VREDENS DAG, allowing Dreyer to create somewhat of a reversal of the final scene in this picture. See more »

Quotes

Morten Borgen: And the rest of us, all the rest of us, we go straight down to hell to eternal torments, don't we? Yes, that's what you think, isn't it?
Peter Petersen: Yes. Words, words, you have them all right.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
A harrowing excursion into the miraculous.
22 February 1999 | by terry-60See all my reviews

Ordet is about faith. It may be the most breathtaking exploration of religious experience ever filmed.

The story is simple, like an old tale. Borgen is a farmer. His son Anders loves Pedersen the tailor's daughter. But Borgen and Pedersen profess different faiths; Pedersen adheres to an austere fundamentalist belief while Borgen believes in an earthier, less metaphysical Christianity. While cordial to each other, both fathers oppose their children's wish to marry.

Borgen has two other sons, a cheerful agnostic named Michel, and Johannes, who studied to be a parson and who now has gone insane pondering the imponderables of faith and doubt. Johannes wanders out in the middle of the night to preach to the wind, and he declares to anyone who will listen that he is the risen Christ.

Michel's wife Inger is the key figure in the drama. She is a radiant, simple, hard-working wife and mother. She honors old Borgen, her father-in-law, and he clearly adores her. Michel and Inger have a frankly carnal love for one another; she is pregnant with their third child. She has the most elemental kind of Christian faith, and trusts that her husband's essential goodness of heart will lead him back to the fold.

All these characters and forces come together in a terrible crisis when Inger goes into premature labor. I'll not divulge the climax, for you should have the same experience of wonder and gratitude I--and probably most moviegoers who've ever seen it--had as it ended.

Two important notes: All this Christianity stuff may turn you off, may make you think Ordet is some gloomy Scandinavian meditation. Banish that thought. While slow-moving, the movie is not boring. The pace is perfect for the subject, and as the crisis comes and the film relentlessly heads toward climax, you cannot take your eyes off it, and your heart pounds in fear and anticipation of what will happen next. Nor is the picture especially intellectual. It is, rather, beautiful, and its themes are articulated in the language of cinema, not the categories of Kierkegaard.

That language, finally, is Carl Dreyer's. His unmistakable film grammar--the hauntingly lit intereriors, the long pans from place to place in the same room, the slightly detached yet intense performances, the most purely photographed exteriors in cinema, echoing the Danish pictorial tradition of Hammershoi, Pedersen, and others who worked a modest magic with the windswept elements of Denmark's hard land--this fiercely personal vision is put to the service of something rare in the movie business (or any other business): love.


89 of 100 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 55 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed