7.0/10
11,231
111 user 47 critic

Oklahoma! (1955)

Trailer
3:16 | Trailer
In Oklahoma, several farmers, cowboys and a traveling salesman compete for the romantic favors of various local ladies.

Director:

Fred Zinnemann

Writers:

Sonya Levien (screen play), William Ludwig (screen play) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Won 2 Oscars. Another 1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gordon MacRae ... Curly McLain
Gloria Grahame ... Ado Annie Carnes
Gene Nelson ... Will Parker
Charlotte Greenwood ... Aunt Eller
Shirley Jones ... Laurey Williams
Eddie Albert ... Ali Hakim
James Whitmore ... Andrew Carnes
Rod Steiger ... Jud Fry
Barbara Lawrence ... Gertie Cummings
Jay C. Flippen ... Skidmore
Roy Barcroft ... Marshal
James Mitchell ... Dream Curly / Dancer
Bambi Linn Bambi Linn ... Dream Laurey / Dancer
Jennie Workman Jennie Workman ... Dancer
Virginia Bosler Virginia Bosler ... Dancer
Edit

Storyline

In the Oklahoma territory at the turn of the twentieth century, two young cowboys vie with a violent ranch hand and a traveling peddler for the hearts of the women they love. Written by Scott Lane <rslane@ix.netcom.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Now everyone can see it-at popular prices! (general release CinemaScope version) See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

During the "Many A New Day" number in Oklahoma! (1955) Virginia Bosler is the dancer seen primping in front of the mirror, and was also chosen to do the "falls" that made Joan McCracken a star in the original Broadway production. But Agnes de Mille re-choreographed them from the original comic intent to something more closely resembling a fainting spell (Virginia suddenly drops to the floor rather than leaps in the air and lands on her side, sliding, as Joan did). It remained a mystery until de Mille was supervising the 1979 revival of Oklahoma! on Broadway and said she "re-did one dance for the new cast. It had originally been built around Joan McCracken - now deceased. Irreplaceable." See more »

Goofs

When Laurie walks into her house when the crowd arrives before going to the Skidmore party, she hears the two girls talking about Curley. One girl's hair is in a long ponytail. The camera pans around the room, and when it goes back to Laurie and the two girls, the girl's hair is no longer in a ponytail. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Curly: [singing] There's a bright golden haze on the meadow, There's a bright golden haze on the meadow. The corn is as high as a elephant's eye, And it looks like it's climbin' clear up to the sky. Oh, what a beautiful mornin', Oh, what a beautiful day! I got a beautiful feelin' Everything's goin' my way.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Video versions - Video transfers derived from the CinemaScope version exist both in the traditional pan-and-scan transfer (such as "Rodgers & Hammerstein Silver Anniversary" edition), and a letterbox transfer. Both of these video transfers are available with and without the "Overture", "Entr'Acte" and "Exit Music". Recently, a video in letterbox transfer has been derived from the Todd-AO version, with the "Overture", "Entr'Acte" and "Exit Music". See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: Jack Frost (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

Many A New Day
(1943) (uncredited)
Music by Richard Rodgers
Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Performed by Shirley Jones and Chorus
See more »

User Reviews

 
Kudos, comments, and a Grail-like search
5 April 2006 | by borg1005See all my reviews

I've just hopped, skipped and jumped through seven pages of back-to-back kudos and other favorable comments on this great movie, and can do little but add mine to the chorus. Therefore, I'd like to focus on some minutiae.

The outstanding actress, among the many, is Gloria Grahame. In my humble opinion, she LIVED the part of Ada Annie. Watch her facial expressions during "I caint say no" and "All or Nuthin' ". The woman radiates sensuality with every line.

In the version shown recently on TV (04/03/06), it appears some lines were cut from "I caint". Unless I'm hallucinating, I remember her singing the following lyrics:

"Cain't seem to say it at all - I hate to disserpoint a beau When he is payin' a call! - Fer a while I ack refined and cool, - A settin on the velveteen setee - Nen I think of thet ol' golden rule, - And do fer him what he would do fer me!"

and at that point she starts idling her hips and flashes a grin of triumph that just REEKS sensuality. Anybody else remember this?

Another subplot(?) rarely mentioned is those two young girls who have a crush on Will and show up in every dance routine. I was enchanted by that little blonde pixie and have been going nuts trying to find out who she was. I suspect she is "Jennie Workman", the first credited dancer (she had one line in "Kansas City"). If so, sadly, she has only this one movie to her credit. If anyone has info on this little charmer, please email me.

I saw this movie soon after it's release in 1955, and was floored by the brilliance of the lyrics, actors in out-of-part roles doing a fantastic job, and the innovative dance routines, including the surreal barroom scene - it IS a dream after all. Fifty years later I still get the same WOW! reaction despite viewing this movie on an almost weekly basis this past month (that darned pixie has got me hooked!).

I wish some local theaters, facing declining audiences and the "home theater" threat, would feature a weekly "Classics Night" and show films like this again. Even a 52" HDTV pales in comparison to the Big Screen impact of some of these old movies, and this one would knock the socks off not only the current generation, but old geezers like myself who remembers when GOOD movies were the norm.


21 of 24 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 111 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 November 1956 (Austria) See more »

Also Known As:

Oklahoma! See more »

Filming Locations:

Sonoita, Arizona, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$15,520
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Western Electric Sound System) (CinemaScope version) (35 mm magnetic prints)

Color:

Color (Technicolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

2.20 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed