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2018 Cannes Film Festival: Oscars be next for ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘BlacKkKlansman’?

2018 Cannes Film Festival: Oscars be next for ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘BlacKkKlansman’?
The Cannes Film Festival just wrapped up its 71st edition and the film with the biggest Oscar potential got a big boost at the closing ceremony. Spike Lee’s, “BlacKkKlansman,” the true story of an African-American cop who infiltrated the Kkk, took home the Grand Prix, the second highest prize of the festival. It was Lee’s first time competing on the Croisette since 1991 when “Jungle Fever” was in competition and was a bit of retribution for Lee after his widely acclaimed 1989 film, “Do the Right Thing,” received nothing from the jury.

If “BlacKkKlansman” were to get nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, it would be the second time a Grand Prix winner has gotten into the race for Oscar’s top honor. The first was “Life is Beautiful” in 1998. Thirteen past Grand Prix winners went on to earn 22 total Oscar nominations with five films scoring seven wins. Each
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16 Cannes Winners That Went on to Take Oscar Gold (Photos)

16 Cannes Winners That Went on to Take Oscar Gold (Photos)
Despite being two of the longest running institutions in cinema, the Oscars and Cannes have not always been the best of bedfellows. Only one film, 1955’s “Marty,” has won both the Palme D’Or and Best Picture. But many more films that have played on the croisette at Cannes have been nominated or won other big prizes from the Academy. These are the 16 films that both won the Palme D’Or and won an additional Oscar.

Marty” (1955)

In the first year that Cannes started calling their top prize the Palme D’Or, the Delbert Mann drama and romance based on the Paddy Chayefsky teleplay won four Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Writing and Best Actor for Ernest Borgnine.

“The Silent World” (1956)

Jacques-Yves Cousteau’s pioneering, underwater nature documentary beat out films from Satyajit Ray, Alfred Hitchcock, Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa and more to win the Palme, and it also took home the Best Documentary Oscar.

Black Orpheus” (1959)

Marcel Camus’s dreamy, contemporary take on the Orpheus and Eurydice Greek myth won the Palme and the Best Foreign Language Oscar.

La Dolce Vita” (1960)

Federico Fellini’s sensuous reverie of a film “La Dolce Vita” managed Oscar nods for Best Director and Screenplay, but only won for Best Costume Design.

A Man and a Woman” (1966)

The Academy rewarded this French New Wave romance starring Anouk Aimee and Jean-Louis Trintignant with two Oscars, one for its screenplay and another for Best Foreign Language Film.

Mash” (1970)

It’s surprising to see Cannes anoint a film as irreverent as Robert Altman’s screwball war satire “Mash,” but though the Oscars nominated it for Best Picture, the award went to another war film, “Patton.” “Mash” did pick up a win for Altman’s ingenious ensemble screenplay.

Apocalypse Now” (1979)

Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam war masterpiece was still a work-in-progress when it screened at Cannes, and it would split the Palme with “The Tin Drum” that same year. It was nominated for eight Oscars and won two, but lost Best Picture to “Kramer vs. Kramer.”

The Tin Drum” (1979)

After splitting the Palme with “Apocalypse Now,” “The Tin Drum” won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar with ease.

All That Jazz” (1980)

Weirdly, Bob Fosse’s musical was nominated alongside “Apocalypse Now” at the 1979 Oscars, opening in December of that year, but it won the 1980 Cannes after cleaning up four Oscars just a month earlier.

“Missing” (1982)

Jack Lemmon won Cannes’s Best Actor prize for Costa-Gavras’s political thriller in addition to “Missing” winning the Palme. And Lemmon and co-star Sissy Spacek each scored acting nominations in addition to the film being nominated for Best Picture, but it only won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

The Mission” (1986)

Starring Robert de Niro and Jeremy Irons as Spanish Jesuits trying to save a native American tribe, Roland Joffe’s “The Mission” won the Palme and earned seven nominations but only one Oscar win for Best Cinematography.

Pelle the Conqueror” (1987)

The legendary Max von Sydow plays a Swedish immigrant in Denmark in this Danish film that won the Palme, the Best Foreign Language Oscar and netted Sydow his first acting nomination.

The Piano” (1993)

Holly Hunter won the Best Actress prize at both Cannes and the Oscars for Jane Campion’s drama that won the Palme D’Or and was nominated for eight Oscars in all.

Pulp Fiction” (1994)

Much has been written about the bombshell Quentin Tarantino set off when “Pulp Fiction” debuted at Cannes and polarized audiences by winning the Palme, not to mention the cultural rift it created when it went head to head with “Forrest Gump” at the Oscars and lost.

The Pianist” (2002)

Winning Best Director for Roman Polanski and Best Actor for Adrien Brody, “The Pianist” was a strong favorite to win Best Picture after winning the Palme, but it lost to the musical “Chicago.” Just don’t expect a repeat from Polanski anytime soon.

Amour” (2012)

Michael Haneke had just won his second Palme D’Or for his sobering romance about old age “Amour,” and rightfully so. The film paired French New Wave legends Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva and scored five Oscar nominations in all, including Best Picture, but only came away with a win for Best Foreign Language Film.

Read original story 16 Cannes Winners That Went on to Take Oscar Gold (Photos) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

7th heaven? Jordan Peele (‘Get Out’) could join six other directing Oscar champs for their debut films

7th heaven? Jordan Peele (‘Get Out’) could join six other directing Oscar champs for their debut films
If Jordan Peele (“Get Out”) takes Best Director at the Oscars, it would have many historic connotations, not the least being he’d be the first black directing champ. But he’d also become just the seventh person to win for a directorial debut. (Fellow nominee Greta Gerwig for “Lady Bird” co-directed 2008’s “Nights and Weekends” with Joe Swanberg.)

The other six to achieve this are Delbert Mann (1955’s “Marty”), Jerome Robbins (co-directed 1961’s “West Side Story” with Robert Wise), Robert Redford (1980’s “Ordinary People”), James L. Brooks (1983’s “Terms of Endearment”), Kevin Costner (1990’s “Dances with Wolves”) and Sam Mendes (1999’s “American Beauty”).

See Christopher Nolan or Greta Gerwig will snatch DGA Award from Guillermo del Toro, our top Users declare

Notice anything about this group? Besides the fact that they’re all dudes? No, it’s not that “West Side Story” was the only film Robbins ever directed.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Greta Gerwig (‘Lady Bird’) could fly into the record books as the fourth youngest directing winner

2018 Oscars: Greta Gerwig (‘Lady Bird’) could fly into the record books as the fourth youngest directing winner
Everyone is (rightfully) focused on Greta Gerwig possibly becoming only the second female Best Director Oscar winner, but that won’t be the only benchmark she’d set with a victory: She would also become the fourth youngest directing champ ever.

Gerwig will be 34 years and 212 days old at the March 4 ceremony and would displace “American Beauty” helmer Sam Mendes, who was 34 years and 238 days old when he won 18 years ago, for the No. 4 slot. She’d be behind “La La Land” director Damien Chazelle (32 years and 38 days), who ended the 86-year “youngest ever” reign of “Skippy”’s Norman Taurog (32 years and 260 days) last year. “Two Arabian Knights”’ Lewis Milestone, who was 33 years and 228 days old when he won one of night’s two directing awards at the first ceremony, is the third youngest champ. Milestone has the distinction of holding two spots in the youngest top 10, which currently is:

1. Damien Chazelle,
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2018 Oscars: Can ‘Get Out’ or ‘Lady Bird’ win Best Picture without an editing nomination?

2018 Oscars: Can ‘Get Out’ or ‘Lady Bird’ win Best Picture without an editing nomination?
The Best Picture Oscar chances for “Get Out and “Lady Bird” took ostensible hits when both failed to get an editing nomination Tuesday. But with so many stats getting broken in recent years, there may still be hope for them yet.

Since the editing category’s inception at the seventh Academy Awards, there has been a strong correlation between Best Editing and Best Picture. Only 10 films have won the top award without an editing nomination. “Birdman” broke the 34-year streak three years ago, though its snub is somewhat explainable since the movie was supposed to look like one long take. The 10 films are:

1. “It Happened One Night” (1934)

2. “The Life of Emile Zola” (1937)

3. “Hamlet” (1948)

4. “Marty” (1955)

5. “Tom Jones” (1963)

6. “A Man for All Seasons” (1966)

7. “The Godfather Part II” (1974)

8. “Annie Hall” (1977)

9. “Ordinary People” (1980)

10. “Birdman” (2014)

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

Get Out” and “Lady Bird” missed the Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

October 31st Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Dawn Of The Dead (2004) and Land Of The Dead Collector’s Editions, Slaughter High

  • DailyDead
Happy (almost) Halloween readers! With October 31st falling on the weekly home entertainment release day, that means we have extra reasons to get excited this Tuesday. Scream Factory has put together two absolutely incredible collector’s edition Blu-rays for George A. Romero’s underrated modern classic Land of the Dead as well as Zack Snyder’s Dawn of the Dead remake, which fans are going to want to add to their own personal collections.

For those of you who may have missed it in theaters, The Dark Tower comes home on Halloween, and Lionsgate has given the cult classic Slaughter High the Vestron Video treatment for their brand new Blu. Blue Underground is also keeping busy this week with a pair of Collector’s Edition sets, too—The Lift and Down—and the complete series of Orphan Black makes its home release bow on Halloween, too.

Other notable Halloween
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The Furniture: Death by Excess in What a Way to Go!

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Any excuse to talk about What a Way to Go! is a good excuse. But the centennial of Ted Haworth is an especially excellent excuse. He was nominated for six Oscars, starting with Marty in 1955. He won for 1957’s Sayonara. Highlights from the rest of his career include Some Like It Hot, The Beguiled, and Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid.

But none of those movies could hold a candle to the astonishing level of creativity on display in What a Way to Go! The epic 1964 comedy of love and loss stars Shirley MacLaine as Louisa May Foster, a many-time widow and heiress. Each husband, with one particularly tragic exception, begins the marriage as a near-pauper who wants nothing but love. But their passion inevitably leads them
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Best Movies to Ever Win Cannes’ Palme d’Or — IndieWire Critic Survey

The Best Movies to Ever Win Cannes’ Palme d’Or  — IndieWire Critic Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of the Cannes Film Festival, the 70th edition of which starts this week, what is the best film to ever win the coveted Palme d’Or?

For a complete list of Palme d’Or winners, click here.

Erin Whitney (@Cinemabite), ScreenCrush

This question is impossible because I clearly haven’t seen all 40 Palme d’Or winners (it’s on my to do list, I swear). But I could easily say “Apocalypse Now,” “Paris, Texas,” “Taxi Driver,” “Amour,” or even “Pulp Fiction.” But since this is a personal question, I have to say “The Tree of Life.” No film has moved me
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Moonlight’ is the Most Frugal Best Picture Ever: See Analysis of the 10 Lowest-Budget Winners of all Time

‘Moonlight’ is the Most Frugal Best Picture Ever: See Analysis of the 10 Lowest-Budget Winners of all Time
With a budget of $1.5 million, 2017 Best Picture winner “Moonlight” cost less than a 30-second ad during the Oscars (reported price: $2.2 million). And, among the category’s 89 winners, it stands as the lowest-budgeted film in the Academy Awards’ history.

To determine the 10 least expensive Best Picture winners, we looked back at each year, researched reported budgets, and then calculated them at 2017 dollar values. Although independent films have dominated the Oscars for the last decade, the only indie to make the cut from that period was “Crash.” Nor did Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall,” or some black-and-white studio classics like “Casablanca” or “The Lost Weekend.”

The 10 straddle almost every decade of the Oscars and come from either independent producers or smaller distributors (four of the 10 were released by United Artists).

For comparison, the most expensive film to win remains “Titanic;” its adjusted budget was $300 million more than “Moonlight.” That total dwarfs the
See full article at Indiewire »

Bad Day at Black Rock

Don’t mess with the one-armed man — did you know that at 56 years, Spencer Tracy could whup Ernest Borgnine to a frazzle? John Sturges knocked this one out of the ballpark and booted his career into high gear. It’s well remembered… but does anyone remember that the subject is the murder of a Japanese-American? It’s a combo social issue film And a tough guy western.

Bad Day at Black Rock

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1955 / Color / 2:40:1 widescreen / 81 min. / Street Date January 17, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Spencer Tracy, Robert Ryan, Anne Francis, Dean Jagger, Walter Brennan, John Ericson, Ernest Borgnine, Lee Marvin, Russell Collins, Walter Sande, Robert Griffin, Harry Harvey.

Cinematography William C. Mellor

Film Editor Newell P. Kimlin

Original Music André Previn

Written by Millard Kaufman, Don McGuire story by Howard Breslin

Produced by Dore Schary

Directed by John Sturges

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Warning to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Network’ Turns 40: Here Are 3 Ways It Changed How We Understand News Media

  • Indiewire
‘Network’ Turns 40: Here Are 3 Ways It Changed How We Understand News Media
Because 2016 cares not for subtlety, this month marks the 40th anniversary of “Network.” Since its release in November 1976 to wide praise and an eventual heap of Oscars, director Sidney Lumet and writer Paddy Chayefsky’s excoriation of the exponentially money-driven, bottom-feeding tendencies of television news has only grown in renown, as each angry pundit updates the film’s library of prophecies about The State of Television Today.

With the ascent of an actual reality TV star to the U.S. Presidency following a broadcast news cycle that worked for everything but a dedication to public interest, it would seem that this depressing political season has reached the logical end of the film’s apocalyptic forecast, landing on a reality too absurd for even “Network” to dramatize: Howard Beale as President. However, as we reflect on what’s gone wrong with contemporary news media and political culture, it’s important to
See full article at Indiewire »

Rod Serling’s ‘Patterns’

Is this Rod Serling's best teleplay ever? Van Heflin, Everett Sloane and Ed Begley are at the center of a business power squeeze. Is it all about staying competitive, or is it corporate murder? With terrific early performances from Elizabeth Wilson and Beatrice Straight. Patterns Blu-ray The Film Detective 1956 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date September 27, 2016 / 14.99 Starring Van Heflin, Everett Sloane, Ed Begley, Beatrice Straight, Elizabeth Wilson, Joanna Roos, Valerie Cossart, Eleni Kiamos, Ronnie Welsh, Shirley Standlee, Andrew Duggan, Jack Livesy, John Seymour, James Kelly, John Shelly, Victor Harrison, Sally Gracie, Sally Chamberlin, Edward Binns, Lauren Bacall, Ethel Britton, Michael Dreyfuss, Elaine Kaye, Adrienne Moore. Cinematography Boris Kaufman Film Editors Dave Kummis, Carl Lerner Art Direction Richard Sylbert Assistant Director Charles Maguire Written by Rod Serling Produced by Michael Myerberg Directed by Fielder Cook

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Let me roll off the titles of some 'fifties 'organization
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Dan Fogelman’s Romance ‘Life Itself’ Movie in the Works

FilmNation Entertainment has tapped “Cars” scribe Dan Fogelman to direct his romance screenplay “Life Itself” with shooting starting in March in New York and Spain.

FilmNation will fully finance, produce and handle international sales for the film while Wme handles U.S. rights. Temple Hill’s Marty Bowen and Wyck Godfrey, whose credits include “The Fault in Our Stars” and the Maze Runner franchise, will produce with FilmNation.

The story is a multi-generational love story, weaving together a number of characters whose lives intersect over the course of decades from the streets of New York to the Spanish countryside and back. Producers are currently casting but no actors have been attached.

Fogelman’s writing credits include the three “Cars” movies, “Tangled,” “Bolt,” “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” “Last Vegas,” “The Guilt Trip” and “Danny Collins,” which he also directed.

Dan Fogelman has one of the most original voices in cinema today,” said FilmNation Entertainment CEO Glen Basner.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Vs Oscar: Why The Palme d’Or And Best Picture Academy Award Don’t Make A Perfect Match

Cannes Vs Oscar: Why The Palme d’Or And Best Picture Academy Award Don’t Make A Perfect Match
As we embark on 69th Cannes Film Festival, the eternal question returns: Why is it that the two most prestigious and glamorous events in cinema — the Riviera festival and the Academy Awards — never seem to agree on what a Best Picture should be? Since 1955, when Cannes began handing out the Palme d'Or — a top prize equivalent to Oscar's Best Picture — the two have been in agreement just once. That was right at the start, when the Ernest Borgnine starrer Marty picked up…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

James Dean's 85th Birthday: 9 Ways His Legacy Lives On After Death

  • PEOPLE.com
James Dean's 85th Birthday: 9 Ways His Legacy Lives On After Death
James Dean would have turned 85 years old on Monday. Feb. 8. Of course, Dean died in an automobile crash on Sept. 30, 1955. He was only 24 years old at the time, meaning that he's been dead almost three times as long as he was alive, yet the image of the heartthrob star still persists - uniquely among stars of his era and uniquely among stars who died young. He still appears on posters, in magazines and in representations on film, and young people today might well know who he is, even if they've never seen one of his movies. In celebration of Dean's 85th birthday,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

James Dean's 85th Birthday: 9 Ways His Legacy Lives On After Death

  • PEOPLE.com
James Dean's 85th Birthday: 9 Ways His Legacy Lives On After Death
James Dean would have turned 85 years old on Monday. Feb. 8. Of course, Dean died in an automobile crash on Sept. 30, 1955. He was only 24 years old at the time, meaning that he's been dead almost three times as long as he was alive, yet the image of the heartthrob star still persists - uniquely among stars of his era and uniquely among stars who died young. He still appears on posters, in magazines and in representations on film, and young people today might well know who he is, even if they've never seen one of his movies. In celebration of Dean's 85th birthday,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Superficial 'News,' Mineo-Dean Bromance-Romance and Davis' fading 'Star': 31 Days of Oscar

'Broadcast News' with Albert Brooks and Holly Hunter: Glib TV news watch. '31 Days of Oscar': 'Broadcast News' slick but superficial critics pleaser (See previous post: “Phony 'A Beautiful Mind,' Unfairly Neglected 'Swing Shift': '31 Days of Oscar'.”) Heralded for its wit and incisiveness, James L. Brooks' multiple Oscar-nominated Broadcast News is everything the largely forgotten Swing Shift isn't: belabored, artificial, superficial. That's very disappointing considering Brooks' highly addictive Mary Tyler Moore television series (and its enjoyable spin-offs, Phyllis and Rhoda), but totally expected considering that three of screenwriter-director Brooks' five other feature films were Terms of Endearment, As Good as It Gets, and Spanglish. (I've yet to check out I'll Do Anything and the box office cataclysm How Do You Know starring Reese Witherspoon, Paul Rudd, and Jack Nicholson.) Having said that, Albert Brooks (no relation to James L.; or to Mel Brooks
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Spotlight, Leonardo DiCaprio, Idris Elba, Brie Larson And Alicia Vikander Big Winners At 22nd SAG Awards

The Screen Actors Guild Awards presented its coveted Actor statuettes for the outstanding motion picture and primetime television performances of 2015 at the 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards held Saturday, Jan. 30 at the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center.

Honored with individual awards were Leonardo DiCaprio, Idris Elba, Brie Larson and Alicia Vikander for performances in motion pictures, and Uzo Aduba, Viola Davis, Idris Elba, Queen Latifah, Kevin Spacey and Jeffrey Tambor for performances in television.

The Screen Actors Guild Awards originated awards for the outstanding performances by a motion picture cast and by television drama and comedy ensembles. The Actor for a motion picture cast performance went this year to Spotlight, while the Actors for television drama and comedy ensemble performances went this year to “Downton Abbey” and “Orange is the New Black”.

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler presented Carol Burnett with the 52nd Life Achievement Award, following a filmed salute to the comedic trailblazer,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

SAG Awards Winners; Including Photo Galleries From The Ceremony

SAG Awards Winners: The 22nd annual awards winners were announced at a ceremony in Los Angeles. SAG Awards Winners

Last night, the Screen Actors Guild dished out their 2016 awards in a ceremony in Hollywood. The SAG awards winners are listed below as well as a full gallery from the evening.

The clear winner on the night was Idris Elba, who managed to grab two awards; one for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role for his role in the superb Beasts Of No Nation, and Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries for Luthor.

SAG Awards Winners

Elsewhere, Leonardo DiCaprio won Male Actor in a Leading Role for The Revenant, while Brie Larson scored Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role for Room. Surely these two are now a cert for Oscar success. In the female supporting category, Alicia Vikander
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Spotlight,’ Leonardo DiCaprio, and Brie Larson Lead 2016 SAG Award Winners

In naming Spotlight one of the best ensembles of 2016, we said, “Tom McCarthy’s procedural moves with the precision of a fine timepiece. Rarely does one find a film where all is tune, from the pacing, writing, direction and acting. Highlighting the heroic work of the Boston Globe’s Spotlight team, the group is headed by Robby Robinson (Michael Keaton) who risks life long friendships to get the story right. His team includes Mike Rezendes (played by a compulsive Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams) and Matt Caroll (Brian d’Arcy James). Encouraged by a Boston outsider, editor Marty Baron (Live Schreiber), the team undertakes a long-term investigation of abuses in the Catholic Church. In the mix are the lawyers on both sides, played by Stanley Tucci and Billy Crudup. Rightfully overshadowing that other journalism docudrama, James Vanderbilt’s incompetent Truth, the difference here amongst many things is perhaps access:
See full article at The Film Stage »
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