7.3/10
4,147
32 user 42 critic

I Live in Fear (1955)

Ikimono no kiroku (original title)
An aging Japanese industrialist becomes so fearful of nuclear war that it begins to take a toll on his life and family.

Director:

Akira Kurosawa
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Toshirô Mifune ... Kiichi Nakajima
Takashi Shimura ... Domestic Court Counselor Dr. Harada
Minoru Chiaki ... Jiro Nakajima
Eiko Miyoshi ... Toyo Nakajima
Kyôko Aoyama Kyôko Aoyama ... Sue Nakajima
Haruko Tôgô Haruko Tôgô ... Yoshi Nakajima
Noriko Sengoku Noriko Sengoku ... Kimie Nakajima
Akemi Negishi ... Asako Kuribayashi
Hiroshi Tachikawa Hiroshi Tachikawa ... Ryoichi Sayama
Kichijirô Ueda ... Mr. Kuribayashi father
Eijirô Tôno ... Old man from Brazil
Yutaka Sada ... Ichiro Nakajima
Kamatari Fujiwara ... Okamoto
Ken Mitsuda Ken Mitsuda ... Judge Araki
Masao Shimizu Masao Shimizu ... Yamazaki, Yoshi's husband (as Gen Shimizu)
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Storyline

Kiichi Nakajima, an elderly foundry owner, is so frightened and obsessed with the idea of nuclear extermination that his family decides to have him ruled incompetent. Nakajima's fervent wish is for his family to join him in escaping from Japan to the relative safety of South America. Harada, a civil volunteer in the case, sympathizes with Nakajima's conviction, but the old man's irrational behaviour prevents the court from taking his fears seriously. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The original Japanese title, "Ikimono no kiroku," is literally translated into "Record of A Living Being." See more »

Quotes

Sue Nakajima: Good old Father. In only two days.
[Jiro beats Sue and chases her around the courtyard]
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Connections

Referenced in Rhapsody in August (1991) See more »

User Reviews

 
Good film
1 April 2005 | by kanarazuSee all my reviews

I felt I had to post because this film, not one of my favorites by Kurosawa but still a one of quality and intelligence, keeps getting bashed by reviewers. The low score (compared to other Kurosawa films) shouldn't discourage potential viewers. Granted, this film takes more patience than some of his other films. However, the subject matter of the atomic bomb and how Japanese society and individuals deal I thought was very seminal. The whole concept of fear is deeply imbued into the film and it questions the sanity of the viewer and the world who live under the constant threat of universal destruction with ignorant self-assurance. The ideas are intelligent and presented with clarity. This film is complete and good in itself and doesn't need to rely on the name of Kurosawa to justify itself. Not a good Kurosawa film to start off with if one is trying to nurse an interest in his fecund movies but a good movie to watch nonetheless particularly if one is at all curious about how Japanese people feel about the horror of the atomic bomb.


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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

25 January 1967 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

I Live in Fear See more »

Filming Locations:

Toho Studios, Tokyo, Japan

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$15,942, 28 July 2002

Gross USA:

$46,808

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$46,808
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Toho Company See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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