6.7/10
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33 user 10 critic

The End of the Affair (1955)

Not Rated | | Drama, Romance | May 1955 (USA)
In WW2 London, a writer falls in-love with the wife of a British civil servant but both men suspect her of infidelity with yet another man.

Director:

Edward Dmytryk

Writers:

Graham Greene (from the novel by), Lenore J. Coffee (screenplay) (as Lenore Coffee)
Reviews
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Deborah Kerr ... Sarah Miles
Van Johnson ... Maurice Bendrix
John Mills ... Albert Parkis
Peter Cushing ... Henry Miles
Michael Goodliffe ... Smythe
Stephen Murray ... Father Crompton
Charles Goldner Charles Goldner ... Savage
Nora Swinburne ... Mrs. Bertram
Frederick Leister ... Dr. Collingwood
Mary Williams Mary Williams ... Maid
Laurence Shiel Laurence Shiel ... Doctor (as O'Donovan Shiell)
Elsie Wagstaff ... Bendrix Landlady
Christopher Warbey Christopher Warbey ... Lancelot Parkis
Nan Munro Nan Munro ... Mrs. Tomkins
Joyce Carey ... Miss Palmer
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Storyline

In war-torn London, Maurice Bendrix (Van Johnson) falls in love with neighbor Sarah Miles (Deborah Kerr). They begin an illicit romance behind Sarah's husband's back. While war does not last forever, neither does love in this existentialist tale. Written by Robert Bole <rjbmbv@teleport.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A TREMENDOUS EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE! (Print Ad- Jamestown Post-Journal, ((Jamestown NY)) 14 June 1955)

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Gregory Peck was offered the lead. See more »

Goofs

Although the story is taking place during and just after World War II, 1944-1946, all of Deborah Kerr's clothing and hairstyles are strictly mid-1950's; there are even some 1950's vintage automobiles visible in the background in many scenes. See more »

Quotes

Sarah Miles: What do you believe in, Henry? All these years I've been married to you I've never really known; I've never even asked. Do you believe that there's a hell and a heaven, and an immortal soul, and a god who rewards and punishes and answers prayers?
Henry Miles: It's not exactly the sort of thing to go into over a cup of tea.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Grosse Pointe: The End of the Affair (2001) See more »

User Reviews

 
Quite Good for 1954
8 January 2007 | by claygoul-1See all my reviews

I am indebted to Turner Classic Movies for televising this film today. I had not seen it. I am a great admirer of both the novel and the 1999 film version by Neil Jordan. I count it as one of the greatest love stories in literature.

Yes, Van Johnson is miscast as Maurice Bendrix. Still, he is a sincere actor and his work is good considering that Maurice has been "Americanized." I wasn't prepared for the devastating performance by Deborah Kerr. Sarah Miles is one of literature's greatest creations. The "saint" as "whore." Or is it the "whore" as "saint?" I found myself engrossed and deeply moved watching her. It only confirmed my belief that she was with Vivian Leigh one of the two best English actresses in cinema. I love Julianne Moore in the 1999 version and equally love Deborah Kerr in the 1954 version. Sarah Miles is such a great creation that it would be wonderful to see another filmed version and compare the work of three actresses.

Incidentally, "The End of the Affair" is one of those notable works of literature that went from the page to the screen to the opera house (Jake Heggie, composer -- commission by The Houston Grand Opera -- 2004.) I do like the treatment given to the other characters in the 1954 film version. We get to meet Smythe and the priest and Sarah's mother. In the Neil Jordan screenplay, Smythe and the priest are combined into one character, a Catholic priest named Smythe. Sarah's mother is omitted in that version. If I was disappointed in the 1954 version it has to do with the character of Smythe. His character has a horrible facial birthmark that Sarah kisses when she parts from him. In the novel we are told that the birthmark disappeared upon her death. We have no idea that this happens in the 1954 film version. In the 1999 film version, the birthmark is given to Lance, Parkis's son. Also, in the novel, Lance suffers from stomach disorders. We learn that he is cured of that upon Sarah's death. No mention is made of this disorder in the 1954 film version.

Henry Miles, the cuckold, is more tragically portrayed in the 1999 film version. I tip the scales in favor to Stephen Rea whose performance is so true to the gravity of Graham Greene's creation.

A great story of human and Divine love with Maurice and Henry fighting for possession of Sarah's soul and only God receives it.


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

May 1955 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The End of the Affair See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Coronado Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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