Blackboard Jungle (1955) - News Poster

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From Godzilla to Some Like it Hot – why the 1950s is my favourite film decade

The decade that invented teenagers and giant radioactive lizards also gave birth to the melodramas of Douglas Sirk, the wry satires of Billy Wilder and saw Hitchcock at his finest

The 1950s: the decade that invented teenagers and giant radioactive lizard monsters. And it’s hard to say which wreaked more destruction.

The 50s saw the rise of the rebel antihero, epitomised by Marlon Brando and James Dean, poster-children for mumbly, misunderstood kids everywhere. Hollywood woke up to the youth market – something that would have far-reaching consequences – dipping its toe into teen culture with Rock Around the Clock and Blackboard Jungle. Teen audiences showed their enthusiasm by spontaneous outbreaks of rioting and cinema-trashing.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The 21 Most Overlooked Directors in Oscar History, From Ingmar Bergman to Alexander Payne

  • Indiewire
It’s not easy to land a Best Director Oscar nomination — even for a white man. Of the hundreds of filmmakers recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in nine decades, just 10 have been African American or women — which is why 2018 nominees Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig are so rare. Not one black Best Director has won since John Singleton became the first nominee with “Boyz in the Hood” in 1991. Kathryn Bigelow is the only woman to ever take home a gold statue, for 2009’s “The Hurt Locker.” The only Asian director asked to accept top honors is Ang Lee, who prevailed for both “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi.”

Many great filmmakers have been nominated for their work outside of directing, including Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Sam Peckinpah, and Rob Reiner, but have never been invited to the Best Director party at all. Still more picked
See full article at Indiewire »

Riverdale season 2 episode 10 review: The Blackboard Jungle

Chris Cummins Jan 19, 2018

Riverdale introduces some dramatic new twists in its latest season 2 episode. Spoilers ahead in our review...

This review contains spoilers.

See related  Hard Sun episode 2 review Hard Sun episode 1 review 28 British TV dramas to watch in 2018

2.10 The Blackboard Jungle

As this week opens, Pops puts away the holiday decorations in preparation for the downright Westerosian long winter that lies ahead as Jughead gravely informs us that Riverdale has become "one of those towns" where only bad things seem to happen. But with the Black Hood seemingly vanquished, things have returned back to normal. After all, Archie is done playing junior crimefighter and is writing songs again, even thinking about starting a band. What could possibly go wrong?

I mean besides our ginger hero being more-or-less blackmailed by an FBI agent into reporting on the activities of his girlfriend's family; a budding civil war at Riverdale High; Cheryl's
See full article at Den of Geek »

Trailer and promo for Riverdale Season 2 Episode 10 – ‘The Blackboard Jungle’

With Riverdale season 2 now on a break until January 17th, The CW has released a trailer and promo for the returning episode of the live-action Archie series, entitled ‘The Blackboard Jungle’; watch them here…

See Also: Follow all of our Riverdale coverage here

Riverdale season 2 airs on Wednesday’s in the Us on The CW and on Thursday’s in The UK on Netflix.

The post Trailer and promo for Riverdale Season 2 Episode 10 – ‘The Blackboard Jungle’ appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Fast Times’ at 35: Cameron Crowe, Amy Heckerling on Courting David Lynch, Sean Penn’s Method Acting, Genital Equality

‘Fast Times’ at 35: Cameron Crowe, Amy Heckerling on Courting David Lynch, Sean Penn’s Method Acting, Genital Equality
The seminal teen flick “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” is celebrating its 35th anniversary on Sunday.

Not only did the coming-of-age tale set in Southern California launch the careers of director Amy Heckerling and writer Cameron Crowe, the comedy catapulted Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Phoebe Cates, and Judge Reinhold into stardom.

And in 2005, “Fast Times,” which was based on Crowe’s 1981 book chronicling his adventures going undercover at a San Diego high school, was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Ironically, “Fast Times” had to overcome many obstacles during production and almost failed to get released.

Among the early difficulties the production encountered was finding a director for the comedy, which also featured future best actor Oscar winners Forest Whitaker and Nicolas Cage — billed as Nicolas Coppola — as well as Eric Stoltz and Anthony Edwards.

Universal executive Thom Mount surprisingly recommended David Lynch, who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Action Star Paul Mormando and Director John A Gallagher to team Up for New Action Film.

Action star Paul Mormando (Bound By Debt)  is gearing up for his next film, to be Directed by Iconic New York Director John Gallagher (The Deli,Street Hunter).  The film titled " The Last Hero is being described as The Warriors meets BlackBoard Jungle. The Last Hero is an action packed revenge movie with an emphasis on star Paul Mormando's world class martial arts skills coupled with John Gallagher's prodigious directorial talents.  Joined by a strong cast that includes Artie Pasquale (Sopranos), Shing Ka (Revenge Of The Green Dragons) and the ever talented Lucie Pohl ( Sarah Q, Red Dwarf)    Filming is scheduled to begin in Early 2018....

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Delinquents

“Here is the screen’s most shocking exposé, of the ‘Baby-Facers’ just taking their first stumbling steps down Sin Street U.S.A.!” Robert Altman’s first feature film is far too good to be described as any but an expert step toward an impressive career. But he had to deal with a young actor who drove him up the wall, Tom Laughlin.

The Delinquents

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1957 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 72 min. / Street Date March 21, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Tom Laughlin, Peter Miller, Richard Bakalyan, Rosemary Howard, Helen Hawley, Leonard Belove, Lotus Corelli, James Lantz, Christine Altman, George Mason Kuhn, Pat Stedman, Norman Zands, James Leria, Julia Lee, Lou Lombardo.

Cinematography: Charles Paddock

Film Editor: Helene Turner

Second Unit Director: Reza Badiyi

Produced, Written and Directed by Robert Altman

The hoods of tomorrow! The gun molls of the future!

Ah, the glorious Juvenile Delinquency film, or J.D. Epic,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Delinquents, Peyton Place and The Wanderers: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Picks

Robert Altman was making a living as an industrial filmmaker in Kansas City, Missouri when an opportunity arose that would change his life — and the history of American movies — forever. It was the mid-1950s and juvenile delinquent movies like The Blackboard Jungle and Rebel Without a Cause were burning up the box office, so the son of a movie theater chain owner approached Altman with idea of producing his own teen film. Altman banged out a script in three or four days, and on a budget of $60,000 shot his first feature, The Delinquents, in two weeks with […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

"In Cold Blood" 50th Anniversary Screening, L.A. March 22

  • CinemaRetro
Laemmle’s Royal Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 50th anniversary screening of Richard Brook’s 1967 film In Cold Blood, based upon the novel of the same name by Truman Capote. The 134-minute film, which stars John Forsythe, Robert Blake and Scott Wilson, will be screened on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at 7:00 pm.

Please Note: At press time, Actor Scott Wilson is scheduled to appear in person for a discussion about the film following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

In Cold Blood (1967)

50th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, March 22, at 7 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Followed by a Q & A with Actor Scott Wilson

In Cold Blood, the film version of Truman Capote’s immensely popular true crime novel, was nominated for four top Oscars in 1967. Richard Brooks received two nominations, for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Film Review: ‘Fist Fight’

Film Review: ‘Fist Fight’
It’s the last day of school at Roosevelt High, and two disgruntled teachers decide to duke it out after the final bell rings in “Fist Fight,” a risible excuse for comedy that treats compulsory education as a joke and violence as a reasonable way to solve problems. In other words, it’s a film perfectly calibrated for the times in which we live, and by far the most disheartening studio-produced movie in recent memory, setting an abysmal example for anyone who goes to school (or the movies, for that matter) still hoping to learn.

Listen carefully, and you can practically hear your brain cells dying during the course of “Fist Fight,” whose principal agenda seems to be how outrageously out-of-control things get at Roosevelt. Anarchy already has the upper hand when idealistic English teacher Andy Campbell (Charlie Day) arrives on campus to discover what the students have perpetrated on
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Breakfast Club,' 'Rushmore' Among Films Added to National Film Registry

'Breakfast Club,' 'Rushmore' Among Films Added to National Film Registry
The Breakfast Club, Rushmore, The Princess Bride and legendary punk documentary The Decline of Western Civilization are among the 25 films that have been inducted into the National Film Registry, the Library of Congress announced Wednesday.

Disney's The Lion King, Who Framed Roger Rabbit? and Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds are also in the Class of 2016's inductees in the registry, which showcases "the range and diversity of American film heritage to increase awareness for its preservation."

The oldest film to be inducted in the Class of 2016 is 1903's Life of an American Fireman,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

National Film Registry: 25 New Films Added, Including ‘Rushmore’ and ‘The Decline of Western Civilization’

  • Indiewire
National Film Registry: 25 New Films Added, Including ‘Rushmore’ and ‘The Decline of Western Civilization’
25 movies have been added to the National Film Registry, bringing the total number of cinematic works officially recognized by the Library of Congress to 700. Among the new additions are “The Birds,” “The Lion King,” “Point Blank” and “Rushmore” — the first of Wes Anderson’s films to be included.

In order to be so honored, a film must be at least 10 years old and deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the National Film Preservation Board. Full list below.

Read More: ‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘L.A. Confidential,’ ‘Shawshank Redemption,’ ‘Top Gun’ & More Enter The National Film Registry

The Atomic Cafe” (1982)

Ball of Fire” (1941)

“The Beau Brummels” (1928)

“The Birds” (1963)

Blackboard Jungle” (1955)

“The Breakfast Club” (1985)

The Decline of Western Civilization” (1981)

East of Eden” (1955)

Funny Girl” (1968)

Life of an American Fireman” (1903)

The Lion King” (1994)

Lost Horizon” (1937)

“Musketeers of Pig Alley” (1912)

Read More: ‘Symbiopsychotaxiplasm,’ ‘Portrait of Jason,’ ‘Imitation of Life’ Among New Additions to National Film Registry
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Birds,’ ‘The Lion King,’ ‘Thelma & Louise’ Join National Film Registry

‘The Birds,’ ‘The Lion King,’ ‘Thelma & Louise’ Join National Film Registry
With the addition of 25 new films — including “The Birds,” “The Lion King,” “The Breakfast Club” and “Thelma & Louise” — the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress now includes 700 films that span more than a century.

The 2016 inductees into the registry include movies long considered classics, obscure documentaries and films once too racy or avant-garde to be accepted by the mainstream. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden made the selections after consulting with a panel of experts who make up the National Film Preservation Board.

Congress established the registry in 1988 with the National Film Preservation Act of 1988 — requiring the Library of Congress to designate and preserve films that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant. Films must be at least 10 years old to be chosen.

Director Ridley Scott said he was “honored and proud” to have the 1991 feminist empowerment ode, “Thelma & Louise,” selected, noting it joined another of his films on the list.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

NYC: Sidney Poitier Retrospective at Museum of the Moving Image Kicks Off This Weekend (April 9-17)

Hey NYC, here's an opportunity to see a selection of Sidney Poitier's film's on the big screen - especially if you've never had the pleasure.  This year marks the 89th birthday (celebrated on February 20th) of a man, a legend who I'm sure needs absolutely no introduction on this website, who overcame decades of stereotypical Hollywood portrayals of black people, and would build a career that would see him become an instrumental figure in the evolution of roles for black actors on screen. From his feature-film debut in 1950 in ''No Way Out,'' starring as a doctor with a sense of justice, to the streetwise student in "The Blackboard Jungle,''...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

NYC: Sidney Poitier Retrospective (Apr. 9-17) at Museum of the Moving Image

Hey NYC, here's an opportunity to see a selection of Sidney Poitier's film's on the big screen - especially if you've never had the pleasure.  This year marks the 89th birthday (celebrated on February 20th) of a man, a legend who I'm sure needs absolutely no introduction on this website, who overcame decades of stereotypical Hollywood portrayals of blacks, and would build a career that would see him become an instrumental figure in the evolution of roles for black actors on screen. From his feature-film debut in 1950 in ''No Way Out,'' starring as a doctor with a sense of justice, to the streetwise student in "The Blackboard Jungle,'' the...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Sidney Poitier to Receive BAFTA’s Highest Honor at Film Awards

Sidney Poitier to Receive BAFTA’s Highest Honor at Film Awards
London — The British Academy of Film and Television Arts will bestow on Sidney Poitier its highest honor, the Fellowship, at the BAFTA Film Awards on Feb. 14. The Fellowship, which is awarded annually, is given to an individual in recognition of “an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.”

Previous recipient of the honor include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench and Martin Scorsese. Mike Leigh received the Fellowship at last year’s film awards.

Amanda Berry, chief executive of BAFTA, said: “Sidney is a luminary of film whose outstanding talent in front of the camera, and important work in other fields, has made him one of the most important figures of his generation. His determination to pursue his dreams is an inspirational story for young people starting out in the industry today. By recognising Sidney with the Fellowship
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sidney Poitier to be honoured with BAFTA Fellowship

  • ScreenDaily
Sidney Poitier to be honoured with BAFTA Fellowship
Pioneering actor to receive BAFTA’s highest honour.

BAFTA is to honour Us actor Sidney Poitier with its Fellowship honour at the Ee British Academy Film Awards in London on Feb 14.

Awarded annually, the Fellowship is the highest accolade bestowed by BAFTA upon an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Fellows previously honoured for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee, Martin Scorsese, Alan Parker and Helen Mirren. Mike Leigh received the Fellowship at last year’s Film Awards.

Poitier said: “I am extremely honored to have been chosen to receive the Fellowship and my deep appreciation to the British Academy for the recognition.”

The pioneering actor’s award-winning career includes six BAFTA nominations, including one BAFTA win for The Defiant Ones (1958), and a British Academy Britannia Award for Lifetime
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Review: Richard Brooks' "In Cold Blood" (1967); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“A Study Of Darkness

By Raymond Benson

One of the more controversial motion pictures to emerge out of what film historians call “New Hollywood” was In Cold Blood, which was released to theaters “for mature audiences only.” The New Hollywood movement began around 1966, when the Production Code finally started to collapse (and before the movie ratings were instituted) and studios commenced allowing auteur filmmakers to do whatever the hell they wanted. The year 1967 was especially a groundbreaking one with the release of such “adult” fare as Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate, In the Heat of the Night, and In Cold Blood.

In Cold Blood is based on the “non-fiction novel” by Truman Capote about the true crime of 1959 in which an innocent family of four in Kansas were murdered by two ex-cons who believed there was $10,000 hidden in a safe in the house (there wasn’t). Capote spent several years writing the book,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Sliff 2015 Review – Once In A Lifetime

The travails and triumphs of teachers have been ample fodder for filmmakers almost since the start of cinema. But it wasn’t until the strains of “Rock Around the Clock” at the start of Blackboard Jungle over 60 years ago that the movies really delved into the true life frustrations that many educators faced. Not only was there rampant violence, but an overall apathy often squelched any attempts at learning. Through the years, similar themes have been explored, from Up The Down Staircase to Dangerous Minds. The teachers in those films struggle to get through to the students, to connect, engage, motivate. Well, it turns out such struggles are universal, even in Paris. That’s the setting of the new drama Once In A Lifetime.

After we witness a heated argument between in the administrative offices over religious garb, we then meet the high school teacher trying against incredible odds to
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Locarno Film Review: ‘The Violin Teacher’

Locarno Film Review: ‘The Violin Teacher’
For anyone who still remembers 1999’s antiseptic Meryl Streep vehicle “Music of the Heart,” Brazilian classroom drama “The Violin Teacher” may sound discouragingly familiar: A down-on-his-luck concert violinist regains his mojo through teaching, bringing harmony to a spiky collective of teens less fortunate than himself. Happily, Sergio Machado’s film brings a little more local color and narrative danger to proceedings, even as it ultimately hews to failsafe crowd-pleaser formula. Given depth and character by the still-waters charisma of star Lazaro Ramos — plus a lively soundtrack that cannily fuses classical standards with favela beats — this year’s highly accessible Locarno closer should hit the right note for a global array of distributors.

“A well-played song will soothe even the fiercest beast,” says reluctant instructor Laerte (Ramos) to his class of string-wielding township kids, voicing a familiar platitude that the script — worked on by many hands, including Machado’s — could just as easily have left unsaid.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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