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Grey's Anatomy Renewed for Season 15!!

It's time to lay some hearty congratulations at the feet of Grey's Anatomy.

They can now lay claim to being ABC's longest running drama series!!

Let the celebration begin, Grey's fans. I have no doubt all of you had a lot to do with this wonderful news.

Until this renewal, Ozzy and Harriet was the longest-running series on ABC, but hardly the longest running series on television.

While Grey's will now be tied with ER for the longest-running medical drama, Gunsmoke, Law & Order and its Svu spinoff, NCIS, CSI, and Bonanza have all run longer across the dial than Grey's over the years and networks.

Related: Grey's Anatomy Stunner: Jessica Capshaw & Sarah Drew Fired

Still, that's little reason to quibble this amazing news for Grey's fans!

The cast has changed vastly over the seasons, but there are still characters remaining from Grey's Anatomy Season 1, including the titular character
See full article at TVfanatic »

'Grey's Anatomy' Renewed for Season 15 at ABC

It's official: Grey's Anatomy will return for the 2018-19 broadcast season.

ABC announced the formal renewal for the medical drama late Friday at the wrap party for the Shonda Rhimes drama. With the season 15 renewal, Grey's Anatomy becomes ABC's longest-running primetime drama ever, passing The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (which ran for 15 seasons and 435 episodes). Only seven dramas in the history of television — Gunsmoke, Law & Order and its Svu spinoff, NCIS, CSI, ER and Bonanza — have had more seasons than Grey's. (And Grey's will now be tied with ER as TV's longest-running medical drama.)<br...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit’

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit’
In the 1970s, Burt Reynolds was arguably the biggest movie star in the world. He had made his name through television, appearing as a regular for 50 episodes on the hit series “Gunsmoke,” then headlining his own series, “Hawk” and “Dan August.” But then Reynolds got his big break in feature films, co-starring in the John Boorman classic “Deliverance” (1972).

Though Reynolds was soon starring in such box-office hits as “The Longest Yard” and “Smokey and the Bandit,” he never abandoned television, utilizing such talk shows as “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” (where he was one of the funniest guests ever) to hone his image, strutting on as a sex symbol and then acting like an utter goofball once he sat the guest’s chair. The contrast between the Cosmopolitan centerfold and the delightful talk show guest endeared Reynolds to moviegoers.

In between his more serious films, such as 1979’s “Starting Over,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
In the 1970s, Burt Reynolds was arguably the biggest movie star in the world. He had made his name through television, appearing as a regular for 50 episodes on the hit series “Gunsmoke,” then headlining his own series, “Hawk” and “Dan August.” But then Reynolds got his big break in feature films, co-starring in the John Boorman classic “Deliverance” (1972).

Though Reynolds was soon starring in such box-office hits as “The Longest Yard” and “Smokey and the Bandit,” he never abandoned television, utilizing such talk shows as “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” (where he was one of the funniest guests ever) to hone his image, strutting on as a sex symbol and then acting like an utter goofball once he sat the guest’s chair. The contrast between the Cosmopolitan centerfold and the delightful talk show guest endeared Reynolds to moviegoers.

In between his more serious films, such as 1979’s “Starting Over,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Supernatural Stars, Ep Ponder the Show's Future Beyond Next Season

Supernatural Stars, Ep Ponder the Show's Future Beyond Next Season
There’s very little doubt that Supernatural will be renewed for Season 14 — but will it go on even longer than that?

In the past, stars Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki have suggested that the 300th episode, landing mid-next season, would be a nice benchmark to end the series on. However, given the show’s continued success, that may no longer be the desired game plan.

“I don’t think that’s going to be our end,” co-showrunner Andrew Dabb told TVLine ahead of Supernatural‘s PaleyFest panel this past Tuesday. “I think we’re going to keep going. I think
See full article at TVLine.com »

NCIS Episode 350: Get a First Look at the Case That Will Mark a Milestone

CBSNCIS soon will join increasingly elite company, as one of a handful of hour-long TV dramas to deliver 350 episodes — and TVLine has a first look and exclusive details on the milestone case.

In the episode “Sight Unseen” — written by executive story editor Brendan Fehily and airing Tuesday, April 17 — a sheriff transporting a recently arrested Petty Officer calls in a drunk driver but then loses control of his vehicle and winds up crashing into a lake. The sheriff is able to escape the vehicle but can’t get the Petty Officer out before the car sinks.

When Gibbs’ NCIS team
See full article at TVLine.com »

Instant gratification: are today's TV shows really too long?

As viewing habits change in the streaming era, viewers and critics increasingly complain about drawn-out programmes. But things were far more meandering in the 70s and 80s

From the perspective of 2018, it seems crazy that television shows used to be so long. The Sopranos ran 13 episodes a year, as did did Breaking Bad. The first series of Prison Break was 22 episodes long. The punishing third series of Lost – the series that crawled on so interminably that it made the exasperated showrunners force the network to announce an endpoint – had 23 episodes. And then there is 24 which, well, you can count.

Weirder still, no one minded. It was standard industry practise, stretching back through the 80s (The A-Team: 25 episodes a year), the 70s (M*A*S*H: 27 episodes), the 60s (Star Trek: 29 episodes) and beyond (Gunsmoke, 1955-75: a staggering 39 episodes). Television was a sausage factory back then, valuing quantity over quality.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

10 Things About Back to the Future 3 You Never Knew

10 Things About Back to the Future 3 You Never Knew
Michael J. Fox suggested it would be fun to visit the Old West and the final installment in the Back to the Future trilogy was born. It's Back to the Future Part III, the movie that gave us a "Mad Dog" and a happy ending for Dr. Emmet Brown. Today, we look at 10 things you missed in Back to the Future Part III.

The Paradox script.

Despite the cliffhanger ending, there were originally no real plans for a Back to the Future sequel. However, once the studio became dead set on making one, director Robert Zemeckis and co-creator Bob Gale agreed to come back to make it. Conceived as a single sequel, a script called Paradox contained elements that were eventually split into II and III. Paradox remained the working title for the sequel shoots and parts of that script were used in the novelizations of the two movies.

Marty's bail.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Review: "Wild Bill" (1995) Starring Jeff Bridges; Twilight Time Blu-ray Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

“When the legend becomes fact, print the legend,” is an often-quoted line from John Ford’s “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.” And if director Walter Hill had stuck to that idea, his “Wild Bill” (1995) would be a great movie, instead of a near miss. Unfortunately, he mixed legend with pure hogwash and the result is a confusing hodgepodge of scenes connected only by the fact that James Butler Hickok (Jeff Bridges) hated it when somebody messed with his hat.

You know a director intends to make a “serious” western when he starts the film out by showing the central character’s funeral. “Wild Bill” begins not only with a funeral, but a funeral shot in high-contrast, grainy black and white. In fact the film keeps switching from color to black and white for numerous flash back scenes, depicting “events” from Bill’s early life, some of which are complete fiction.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Palm Springs Film Review: ‘The Last Movie Star’

Palm Springs Film Review: ‘The Last Movie Star’
Nobody played the role of movie star in the 1970s with more confidence than Burt Reynolds. Even as his choice of vehicles grew so indiscriminate as to gradually erode his box office appeal, he still radiated swagger, that ever-present smirk suggesting he — and we — knew it was all a put-on anyway. Perhaps the problem was that it was just too good an act: Burt Reynolds gave such excellent “Burt Reynolds” on talk shows, in interviews and other forums that the public saw little point in continuing to fork out cash money to see him do the same thing in yet another mediocre, derivative big-screen comedy or thriller. He didn’t take enough risks, and the few times he did were misfires or weren’t appreciated enough. Few stars achieved such massive popularity while retaining a sense of unrealized potential.

It’s a bittersweet legacy that writer-director Adam Rifkin aims to pay affectionate tribute to in “The Last Movie Star,” which
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dick Van Dyke Show Star Rose Marie Dishes on Her Wild Life Palling Around with Legends Frank Sinatra and Al Capone

Iconic TV, stage and screen actress Rose Marie is a living legend whose star-studded career and life story are the stuff of Hollywood fairy tales.

A famous child star at age 4, Marie’s made a mark on nearly every aspect of the entertainment industry, including Vaudeville, radio, film, Broadway, and television, whose fans best know her as plucky comedy writer Sally Rogers on The Dick Van Dyke Show.

But just as fascinating as the 92-year-old performer’s impressive résumé is her slate of famous friends – she had a four decades-long friendship with Frank Sinatra and she is the last person
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Kurt Russell Will Play Santa Claus in Netflix’s Next Christmas Film

Kurt Russell, best known for his roles in “Gunsmoke,” “Lost in Space,” “Tombstone,” and “Overboard,” (to name just a few) is now taking on a new, somewhat out-of-character role as St. Nicholas in a new Christmas film being created by Netflix. Russell is best known as being the tough, no-nonsense, bad-boy type, but with age, it seems as though he is ready to take on some new acting challenges. At 66-years-old, Russell is embracing this new role, which is backed by the streaming giant, Netflix and being led by Clay Kaytis, who is the co-director of “The Angry Birds Movie.”

Kurt Russell Will Play Santa Claus in Netflix’s Next Christmas Film
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Remembering Tom Petty, Oscar-Winning 'Star Wars' Costumer John Mollo and More Reel-Important People We Lost in October

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Dennis Banks (1937-2017) - Native American Activist, Actor. He appears in The Last of the Mohicans and Older Than America, as himself in Thunderheart and the documentaries Incident at Oglala and Sing Your Song. He was also the subject of the 2010 doc A Good Day to Die. He died on October 29. (Star Tribune) Ben Bates (1933-2017) - Stunt Man. In addition to doing stunts for TV's Gunsmoke and the movie The White Buffalo, he also played...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Harry Stradling Jr., ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer, Dies at 92

Harry Stradling Jr., ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer, Dies at 92
Harry Stradling Jr., a two-time Academy Award-nominated cinematographer for “1776” and “The Way We Were,” died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 92.

He was the son of cinematographer Harry Stradling, who has more than 130 credits to his name, including “A Streetcar Named Desire,” “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” and “My Fair Lady.” His great uncle was a cinematographer in the silent era, known for films starring Mary Pickford.

“Harry was a giant in the business,” Steven Poster, president of the Icg said in a statement. “Between him and his father, they spanned almost the entire history of motion picture industry before the end of last century. I first remember his name from watching ‘Gunsmoke’ as a kid. When I first met him, it was like meeting a star, and I will never forget that.”

During his prolific film career, Stradling Jr. worked heavily in Westerns, including cinematography
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Harry Stradling Jr. Dies: ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer Was 92

Harry Stradling Jr., the cinematographer behind the lens of The Way We Were, Little Big Man, 1776 and numerous episodes of Gunsmoke, among many others, died October 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills. He was 92. Steven Poster, President of the International Cinematographers Guild, called Stradling Jr. “a senior spokesperson for this industry.” “I grew up seeing his name on Gunsmoke,” said Poster. “He shot so many wonderful movies. He just had a quality about…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Harry Stradling Jr. Dies: ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer Was 92

Harry Stradling Jr. Dies: ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer Was 92
Harry Stradling Jr., the cinematographer behind the lens of The Way We Were, Little Big Man, 1776 and numerous episodes of Gunsmoke, among many others, died October 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills. He was 92. Steven Poster, President of the International Cinematographers Guild, called Stradling Jr. “a senior spokesperson for this industry.” “I grew up seeing his name on Gunsmoke,” said Poster. “He shot so many wonderful movies. He just had a quality about…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Ben Bates Dies: ‘Gunsmoke’ Stunt Double was 84

Stunt double Ben Bates, best known for his work substituting for Gunsmoke star James Arness for more than 25 years, died Oct. 4 in Sun City, California, according to his family. He was 84. Bates’s long career included doubling spots for the television series How the West Was Won (for which he was also a stunt coordinator), McClain’s Law, Bosom Buddies, The Fall Guy and Matt Houston. He also appeared in the film The Legend of the Lone Ranger and the TV movies The Alamo: Thi…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Ben Bates, Stunt Double for 'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness, Dies at 84

Ben Bates, Stunt Double for 'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness, Dies at 84
Ben Bates, who served as the stunt double for James Arness, the star of Gunsmoke, for more than 25 years, died Oct. 4 in Sun City, Calif., his family announced. He was 84.

In addition to stepping in for Arness as Marshal Matt Dillon on the long-running CBS Western, Bates doubled for the actor on the TV series McClain's Law and How the West Was Won (on which Bates also served as stunt coordinator) and in the TV movies Red River and The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory.

In 2001's James Arness: An Autobiography, Bates said that each...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Ben Bates, Stunt Double for 'Gunsmoke' Star James Arness, Dies at 84

Ben Bates, who served as the stunt double for James Arness, the star of Gunsmoke, for more than 25 years, died Oct. 4 in Sun City, Calif., his family announced. He was 84.

In addition to stepping in for Arness as Marshal Matt Dillon on the long-running CBS Western, Bates doubled for the actor on the TV series McClain's Law and How the West Was Won (on which Bates also served as stunt coordinator) and in the TV movies Red River and The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory.

In 2001's James Arness: An Autobiography, Bates said that each...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Hour of the Gun

It’s the one saga of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral that puts Western legend into proper perspective as to the nature of money, power and the law: Edward Anhalt’s vision is of a gangland turf war with sagebrush and whiskey bottles. James Garner is a humorless Wyatt Earp, matched by Jason Robards’ excellent Doc Holliday. It’s one of John Sturges’ best movies.

Hour of the Gun

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 101 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: James Garner, Jason Robards, Robert Ryan, Albert Salmi, Charles Aidman, Steve Ihnat, Michael Tolan, William Windom, Lonny Chapman, Larry Gates, William Schallert, Jon Voight.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Art Direction: Alfred C. Ybarra

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Edward Anhalt

Produced and Directed by John Sturges

Producer-director John SturgesHour of the Gun was a dismal non-performer in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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