6.2/10
303
16 user 1 critic

The Yellow Tomahawk (1954)

Approved | | Western | May 1954 (USA)
When the army insists on building a fort on Indian land, in defiance of a treaty, the warnings of a scout go unheeded.

Director:

Lesley Selander

Writers:

Richard Alan Simmons (screenplay), Harold Jack Bloom (story)
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Rory Calhoun ... Adam Reed
Peggie Castle ... Katherine Bohlen
Noah Beery Jr. ... Tonio Perez (as Noah Beery)
Warner Anderson ... Maj. Ives
Peter Graves ... Walt Sawyer
Lee Van Cleef ... Fire Knife
Rita Moreno ... Honey Bear
Dan Riss ... Sgt. Bandini
Walter Reed ... Keats
Patrick Sexton Patrick Sexton ... Lt. Bascomb (as Patrick Joseph Sexton)
Robert Bray ... Lt. Banion
Adam Williams ... Cpl. Maddock
James Best ... Pvt. Bliss
Ned Glass ... Willy
Edit

Storyline

In Wyoming Territory, army Major Ives and his men are building a temporary camp. The civilian surveyor, Mr. Keats is making preparations for the construction of a large permanent fort. However, the future fort is being erected on Cheyenne lands, in defiance of the treaty. Adam Reed is a self employed scout with friendly ties to the Cheyenne. Upset about the construction of the new fort on their lands, the Cheyenne ask scout Reed to contact Major Ives and deliver their message of grievance to him. The symbolic message consists of a yellow tomahawk as a warning against the building of a new fort in the area. Reed delivers the warning message to Major Ives but he is not taken serious. Major Ives lectures Reed about the need of bringing civilization to the lands that otherwise would go to waste under the savages. Reed retorts that Major Ives' only duty is to escort wagon trains of settlers passing through Cheyenne territory rather than build new forts in violation of the treaty. Reed also... Written by nufs68

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

An Indian Scout and a Blonde Wildcat . . . They Faced the Most Savage of All Indian Raids! See more »

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Frances Farmer Presents: The Yellow Tomahawk (1958) See more »

User Reviews

 
Some things to like
14 September 2015 | by drystyxSee all my reviews

A lot of the B Westerns were "fluff", but usually the director or writer would want to add some "sidebar" on for their personal motif.

It is the "sidebar" that is usually the message the director and writer want to display. Sometimes, it is "advertising" for products, such as tobacco companies, soda companies, or what have you.

Here, either Director Selander, or writers Simmons and Boone, looked to want to add their own flavor to a fairly routine cavalry Western.

Like most Westerns of the day, the Indians are depicted as semi good guys with evil white men upsetting the apple cart.

The overkill of the evil white men has always been very politically correct, and especially was in the decades that followed this movie.

However, the real sidebar here is what happens with the evil corrupt cavalry officer who causes at least two massacres, quite knowingly, quite viciously.

Also, a few red herrings come into play here. The fates of a few of the characters you won't guess, as they go against the usual Hollywood propaganda formula. Thus, this particular Western has some surprises by the end.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 16 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

May 1954 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Fire Knife See more »

Filming Locations:

Colorado City, Arizona, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed