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Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)

Passed | | Drama | May 1954 (USA)
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Three American women working in Rome, Italy, share a spacious apartment and the desire to find love and marriage, each experiencing a few bumps in their journeys to romance.

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Writers:

(screen play), (from a novel by)
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Won 2 Oscars. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
... John Frederick Shadwell
... Miss Frances
... Anita Hutchins
... Prince Dino di Cessi
... Maria Williams
... Giorgio Bianchi
... Burgoyne
... Mrs. Burgoyne
... Principessa
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Storyline

Three American women, rooming together while working abroad in Rome, Italy, hope for romance and marriage. Frances, oldest of the three, has been fifteen years a secretary to novelist John Frederick Shadwell, a man whom she loves but whose reclusive nature prompts most people to believe him long since dead. Anita, one week away from returning to America (under the claim of getting married), finally bucks company rules (and gets caught) by finally accepting an invitation from an Italian co-worker to visit his family's farm for his sister's wedding. Newly arrived Maria soon sets her generally innocent eyes on Dino di Cessi, an actual prince with a reputation for womanizing, and makes a play for him by making herself his perfect match. Written by statmanjeff

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

You've Never Lived Until You've Loved in Rome!

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

May 1954 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Drei Münzen im Brunnen  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording) (magnetic prints)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first motion picture filmed in CinemaScope outside of the United States. Prior to beginning principal shooting, 20th Century-Fox studio execs warned producer Sol C. Siegel and director Jean Negulesco that they would have a difficult time with the new film format away from the controlled settings of the studio. Siegel and Negulesco solved this dilemma by simply taking the studio's entire technical crew along to Rome. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the final scene at the Trevi fountain, the fountain is dry and being cleaned. While the actors are there, the fountain begins flowing again; when the actors leave, the fountain is completely full -- not a possibility given the size of the fountain and the period of time over which the scene occurs. See more »

Quotes

John Frederick Shadwell: Why can't women play the game properly? Everyone knows that in love affairs only the man has the right to lie.
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Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: Angels Revenge (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Anima e Core
(1950) (uncredited)
Music by Salvatore Esposito
(This song was sung at the hillside picnic near the home of Giorgio when he took Anita to meet his parents.)
I have corrected the spelling of the title of this song, and I have corrected the composer's name and the Songwriter's name. Your automatic system would not allow me to correct the songwriter's name which should be: Domenico Titomanlio.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

CinemaScope vacations in Italia!
28 April 2003 | by See all my reviews

Not much to add to the other comments here, except to say that it may be understandable that this one got a Best Picture nomination in the 1954 Oscar derby if you were able to see a pristine print, with a stereo soundtrack, in a first-class theater as I had the opportunity of doing when it was first released. The opening sequence of numerous fountains in full flood as Frank Sinatra crooned the Oscar-winning title song was just dazzling to those of us Americans who hadn't yet made a Grand Tour of Europe. What followed contained no surprises, certainly, though some eyebrows were raised by the Jean Peters/Rossano Brazzi "illicit" romance. I never understood how Maggie McNamara ever passed muster with any studio's casting director, nor how the makers of this pastiche could have thought that the suavely handsome Louis Jourdan, playing an Italian of noble descent, would finally settle for a manipulative young American whose machinations had, prior to his capitulation, been nakedly revealed. The lovely Ms. McGuire setting her cap for the aging, fastidious old fop, so well incarnated by Mr. Webb, was another of the difficulties even those first audiences had in suspending their disbelief.

But, oh!, those glorious travelogue shots of Rome and Venice. Widescreens, back then, really were worth briefly deserting one's living room "boob tube" and letting one's mind drift into Nirvana as beautiful DeLuxe Color made one believe the world was an impossibly beautiful place. A new DVD version which approximates the original CinemaScope ratio is now available, a distinct improvement over the formatted VHS tape previously available.


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