6.3/10
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43 user 20 critic

Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)

G | | Drama, Romance | May 1954 (USA)
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Three American women working in Rome, Italy, share a spacious apartment and the desire to find love and marriage, each experiencing a few bumps in their journeys to romance.

Director:

Jean Negulesco

Writers:

John Patrick (screen play), John H. Secondari (from a novel by)
Reviews
Won 2 Oscars. Another 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Clifton Webb ... John Frederick Shadwell
Dorothy McGuire ... Miss Frances
Jean Peters ... Anita Hutchins
Louis Jourdan ... Prince Dino di Cessi
Maggie McNamara ... Maria Williams
Rossano Brazzi ... Giorgio Bianchi
Howard St. John ... Mr. Burgoyne
Kathryn Givney ... Mrs. Burgoyne
Cathleen Nesbitt ... Principessa
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Storyline

Three American women, rooming together while working abroad in Rome, Italy, hope for romance and marriage. Frances, oldest of the three, has been fifteen years a secretary to novelist John Frederick Shadwell, a man whom she loves but whose reclusive nature prompts most people to believe him long since dead. Anita, one week away from returning to America (under the claim of getting married), finally bucks company rules (and gets caught) by finally accepting an invitation from an Italian co-worker to visit his family's farm for his sister's wedding. Newly arrived Maria soon sets her generally innocent eyes on Dino di Cessi, an actual prince with a reputation for womanizing, and makes a play for him by making herself his perfect match. Written by statmanjeff

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

You've Never Lived Until You've Loved in Rome!

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

May 1954 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Drei Münzen im Brunnen See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Western Electric Recording) (magnetic prints)

Color:

Color (DeLuxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although the movie title refers to three coins, only two coins are actually seen thrown into the fountain. The third is reportedly, thrown in by Giorgio. See more »

Goofs

Despite the title, and the title song, only TWO coins are tossed in the fountain; one of the three participants chooses not to do so. See more »

Quotes

Miss Frances: [sarcastic toast] To the fountain of Trevi! To the lovely, romantic fountain of Trevi. Where hope can be had for a penny!
John Frederick Shadwell: People are looking at you.
Miss Frances: Well, high time!
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Connections

Referenced in Ten Thousand Bedrooms (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

Nanni
(uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Franco Silvestri
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

You might want change back......
30 September 2002 | by Poseidon-3See all my reviews

The title song of this high-rung soap opera is beautifully sung by Frank Sinatra over gorgeous shots of Rome in a sequence before the credits begin. This was bound to have put 1950's audiences in the right frame of mind to enjoy the fluffy, trite, overtly romantic film that follows. Today's audience might have some trouble. The story involves a young lady (McNamara) who travels to Rome to work as a secretary. She is replacing Peters who is set to return back the U.S. for an impending marriage. Then McGuire is the older, more world-weary of the three who wonders if she'll ever find love. Ironically, despite the movie's title, only TWO coins make it into the fountain! I guess a story about three women called "Two Coins in the Fountain" may have confused people? McNamara, coy, elfin and slightly malformed-looking was hot off the success of "The Moon is Blue" and hogs much of the screen time in a pretty predictable romance with ever-suave Jourdan. Her character is consistently irritating, not helped by her "Look Mommy, I did it myself" bangs and horrible ponytail. Peters is ravishing. Though none of the women are enviable, at least she is gorgeous and sexy. Her husky voice helping to cut through the icing of the film, she trots around in snug calf-length skirts and hoop earrings. McGuire has what has to be one of her worst roles. She does well in it, but has little to do but feign interest in the ludicrous, foppish, unattractive Webb. He is a casting casualty, thinking he's intriguing and witty and not being so. Brazzi is interesting to watch as Peters' love interest. He's attractive and practically pants for her, he's so smitten. The director made no less than four of these types of stories (three ladies looking for love) and this one might be the least fascinating (possibly because, unlike the other three, this one doesn't have Joan Crawford, Marilyn Monroe or Ann-Margret!) The scenery and the title fountain are glorious, but the film lacks zest. Good for a chuckle or two are the ghastly costumes by usually reliable Dorothy Jeakins. A few nice clothes slip in, but much of it looks like science fiction. It is completely stunning that this got a Best Picture Oscar nomination. It's not an actively horrible movie, but it isn't anything anyone would dream would be worthy of the top honor in the industry. By now it's type has been copied so much that modern viewers may very well sleep through it.


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