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Salt of the Earth ()


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Mexican workers at a Zinc mine call a general strike. It is only through the solidarity of the workers, and importantly the indomitable resolve of their wives, mothers and daughters, that... See more »

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...
Sheriff
...
Barton
David Sarvis ...
Alexander
Mervin Williams ...
Hartwell
...
Esperanza Quintero
E.A. Rockwell ...
Vance
William Rockwell ...
Kimbrough
Juan Chacón ...
Ramon Quintero (as Juan Chacon)
Henrietta Williams ...
Teresa Vidal
Ángela Sánchez ...
Consuelo Ruiz (as Angela Sanchez)
Clorinda Alderette ...
Luz Morales
Virginia Jencks ...
Ruth Barnes
Clinton Jencks ...
Frank Barnes
Joe T. Morales ...
Sal Ruiz
...
Charley Vidal (as Ernest Velasquez)
Charles Coleman ...
Antonio Morales
Victor Torres ...
Sebastian Prieto
Frank Talevera ...
Luis Quintero
Mary Lou Castillo ...
Estella Quintero
Floyd Bostick ...
Jenkins
E.S. Conerly ...
Kalinsky (as E. S. Conerly)
Adolfo Barela ...
Miner
Albert Munoz ...
Miner
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Elvira Molano ...
Mrs. Salazar (uncredited)

Directed by

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Herbert J. Biberman

Written by

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Michael Wilson ... (by)

Produced by

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Paul Jarrico ... producer
Jules Schwerin ... associate producer (uncredited)

Music by

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Sol Kaplan

Cinematography by

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Stanley Meredith ... (uncredited)
Leonard Stark ... (uncredited)

Film Editing by

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Joan Laird ... (uncredited)
Ed Spiegel ... (uncredited)

Production Management

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Jules Schwerin ... production manager (uncredited)

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Jules Schwerin ... assistant director (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Harry Smith ... sound (uncredited)
Dick Stanton ... sound (uncredited)

Other crew

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Adolfo Barela ... staff executive
Sonja Dahl Biberman ... staff executive (as Sonja Dahl)

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

Based on an actual strike against the Empire Zinc Mine in New Mexico, the film deals with the prejudice against the Mexican-American workers, who struck to attain wage parity with Anglo workers in other mines and to be treated with dignity by the bosses. In the end, the greatest victory for the workers and their families is the realization that prejudice and poor treatment are conditions that are not always imposed by outside forces. Written by Bob Shields

Plot Keywords
Taglines Banned! The film the US government didn't want you to see! See more »
Genres
Parents Guide View content advisory »
Certification

Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • Le sel de la terre (France)
  • La sal de la tierra (Spain)
  • Shehui zhongjian (China, Mandarin title)
  • La sal de la tierra (Argentina)
  • O Sal da Terra (Brazil)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 94 min
Country
Language
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Filming Locations

Did You Know?

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Trivia This movie was the only blacklisted film ever in American film history. It was blacklisted during the 1950s during the height of the Cold War scare. See more »
Goofs CC on the TCM broadcast misidentifies a music snippet as "When Johnny Comes Marching Home," but it is actually "John Brown's Body" [aka "Battle Hymn of the Republic"]. See more »
Movie Connections Featured in Precious Images (1986). See more »
Soundtracks We Shall Not be Moved See more »
Crazy Credits Opening credits prologue: our scene is NEW MEXICO LAND OF THE FREE AMERICANS WHO INSPIRED THIS FILM HOME OF THE BRAVE AMERICANS WHO PLAYED MOST OF ITS ROLES. See more »
Quotes Esperanza Quintero: [opening narration] How shall I begin my story that has no beginning? My name is Esperanza, Esperanza Quintero. I am a miner's wife. This is our home. The house is not ours. But the flowers... the flowers are ours. This is my village. When I was a child, it was called San Marcos. The Anglos changed the name to Zinc Town. Zinc Town, New Mexico, U.S.A. Our roots go deep in this place, deeper than the pines, deeper than the mine shaft. In these arroyos my great grandfather raised cattle before the Anglos ever came. The land where the mine stands - that was owned by my husband's own grandfather. Now it belongs to the company. Eighteen years my husband has given to that mine. Living half his life with dynamite and darkness. Who can say where it began, my story? I do not know. But this day I remember as the beginning of an end. It was my Saint's Day. I was thirty-five years old. A day of celebration. And Iwas seven months gone with my third child. And on that day - I remember I had a wish... a thought so sinful...... a thought so evil that I prayed God to forgive me for it. I wished... I wished that my child would never be born. No. Not into this world.
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