Rear Window (1954) - News Poster

(1954)

News

Julianne Moore in talks to star opposite Amy Adams in The Woman in the Window

Julianne Moore is currently in talks to jump on board The Darkest Hour director Joe Wright’s thriller, The Woman in the Window.

In the adaptation of A.J. Finn’s book, Moore would take on the role of the mother of a mysterious young boy who moves in across the street. Arrival’s Amy Adams is portraying a child psychologist with severe agoraphobia (and a penchant for mixing alcohol with her medication) who hasn’t left her house in months. The woman believes she witnessed a horrible crime involving a new neighbouring family but no one, including the police, will believe her.

The story, which is a nod to Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, is adapted by Tracy Letts. Scott Rudin and Eli Bush are producing the pic. Elizabeth Gabler and Marisa Paiva are overseeing for Fox 2000.

Also in the news – Ralph Fiennes to take the lead in Terry Gilliam
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Perfect Things Which Are Perfect. "Rear Window" Edition

by Nathaniel R

This past weekend Jason and I went to a big screen showing of Hitchcock's masterpiece Rear Window (1954). Or one of his masterpieces that is; has more than his share, that one. We went just because it was playing (bless you rep scene) and it was the absolutely best thing to see during an actual heatwave in NYC because it's set during one yet it's its own air-conditioning. It's utterly cool...

I love that so many characters in the picture but especially Lb (Stewart), eternally in pajamas and broken leg cast, come across like the heat is wearing at their nerves, temper, and clothing. Except Grace Kelly as Lisa Carol Fremont, who just floats onto the screen in a cocktail dress, in slomo no less in one of the cinema's all time greatest entrances. Lisa always looks like she is immune to common people concerns like the weather.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Summer of 84 Trailer Turns The Goonies Into a Slasher Thriller

Summer of 84 Trailer Turns The Goonies Into a Slasher Thriller
If you love Stranger Things, The Goonies, The 'Burbs, Rear Window and Disturbia, then you're going to love Summer of 84, as it pulls all these classic VHS tapes off the shelf and shoves them into a blender, pushing puree. This looks like a fun nostalgia bump, which will have you yearning for kids on milk cartons. And it's coming our way this summer.

Summer of 84 looks like a good blast of scary fun. It comes from the team responsible for Turbo Kid. The collective calls itself Rkss, getting a directorial credit under that moniker, which stands for Roadkill Superstar. Rkss is actually made up of Ran&#231ois Simard, Anouk Whissell and Yoann-Karl Whissell, who may or may not actually be real, living breathing people.

The movie is written by Matt Leslie & Stephen J. Smith. The ensemble cast is made up of young up and coming actors that include Graham Verchere,
See full article at MovieWeb »

New ‘Summer of 84’ Trailer Teases ‘Stranger Things’ with a Serial Killer

Gunpowder & Sky has released a new trailer for the upcoming film Summer of 84, which is a throwback coming-of-age story with a killer twist. The story follows a group of teenage friends in the summer of 1984 who begin to suspect one of their neighbors is a serial killer who’s on the loose. The film hails from Turbo Kids directors Rkss and Stranger Things comparisons will be impossible to ignore. Indeed, it looks like Stranger Things meets Disturbia, that Rear Window redo starring Shia Labeouf. The film …
See full article at Collider.com »

Costuming Hitchcock: An Extract from Hitchcock’s Heroines by Caroline Young

Author Caroline Young has just released a fascinating new book entitled Hitchcock’s Heroines (published by Insight Editions). It celebrates and studies the women in Hitchcock movies; their influence, semblance and iconography. What’s more, Young also examines the role costume design plays with these women, both the characters and the actresses who played them, and how they can be interpreted as far more than just ‘icy blondes’. Here we have an extract of the book exclusively for Clothes on Film:

Kim Novak’s grey suit the colour of San Francisco fog in Vertigo, Grace Kelly as the too-perfect woman in Rear Window, and Janet Leigh’s black and white sets of underwear to indicate both good and evil in Psycho – these are just some of the classic imagery of Alfred Hitchcock’s films, where the style and elegance of his leading lady was carefully planned.

Hitchcock was meticulous about the visuals,
See full article at Clothes on Film »

A24 Delayed ‘Under the Silver Lake’ Until December — and It’s Another Smart, Radical Move for the Distributor

On Friday morning, with little fanfare, A24 announced that David Robert Mitchell’s sprawling film noir, “Under the Silver Lake,” would no longer be released June 22. Instead, it’s been pushed to December 7. Nor was the company interested in discussing the six-month time shift. A24 spokeswoman Nicolette Aizenberg only responded to our query with a cryptic email: “Indeed we moved the date.”

However, in a company known for smart and radical moves, this appears to be another one. Here’s why.

1. Cool Cannes reception

Mitchell had plenty of reasons to be grateful to the festival for supporting his first two films, “The Myth of the American Sleepover” and “It Follows,” which both played Critics Week. Positive reaction for his debut gave Mitchell the confidence to quit his editing job and focus on getting “It Follows” made. The festival “helped to make that happen,” he told me at an American Pavilion panel at Cannes.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

A24 Delayed ‘Under the Silver Lake’ Until December — and It’s Another Smart, Radical Move for the Distributor

A24 Delayed ‘Under the Silver Lake’ Until December — and It’s Another Smart, Radical Move for the Distributor
On Friday morning, with little fanfare, A24 announced that David Robert Mitchell’s sprawling film noir, “Under the Silver Lake,” would no longer be released June 22. Instead, it’s been pushed to December 7. Nor was the company interested in discussing the six-month time shift. A24 spokeswoman Nicolette Aizenberg only responded to our query with a cryptic email: “Indeed we moved the date.”

However, in a company known for smart and radical moves, this appears to be another one. Here’s why.

1. Cool Cannes reception

Mitchell had plenty of reasons to be grateful to the festival for supporting his first two films, “The Myth of the American Sleepover” and “It Follows,” which both played Critics Week. Positive reaction for his debut gave Mitchell the confidence to quit his editing job and focus on getting “It Follows” made. The festival “helped to make that happen,” he told me at an American Pavilion panel at Cannes.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Under the Silver Lake’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Under the Silver Lake’
When I tell you that “Under the Silver Lake,” David Robert Mitchell’s seductive and disturbing Los Angeles head-trip noir, is basically a sustained homage to David Lynch, and that Mitchell achieves the exact look and mood and pace and vibe he’s going for, you may think that it’s the kind of movie you’re going to get excited about. To a degree, you should. But the comparison comes with a major qualifier: There are moments when “Under the Silver Lake” evokes David Lynch the tranced-out Hollywood Babylon yarn-spinner of “Mulholland Drive” — but mostly, it’s an homage to the Lynch who gnaws on the weirder fringes of the everyday-surreal, the Lynch of “Lost Highway” or even, at times, the reboot of “Twin Peaks.”

“Under the Silver Lake” is a down-the-rabbit-hole movie, at once gripping and baffling, fueled by erotic passion and dread but also by the code-fixated opacity of conspiracy theory.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Blu-ray Review: The ‘Burbs (Collector’s Edition)

When it comes to the movies that get replayed frequently in my house, Joe Dante’s The ‘Burbs is easily amongst the top five on that list. A darkly comedic send-up of suburban horror and Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, similar to many other great films of its time, The ‘Burbs was vastly overlooked during its release, only to find vindication in the decades that followed, as fans have continually caught up with its brilliant hilarity. Shout Factory recently put together a gorgeous Collector’s Edition for The ‘Burbs and while I’m grateful for how wonderful it looks, I must say the real treat here for longtime fans is the workprint version of the film, which is endlessly fascinating for those of us who know the theatrical version inside and out. And that’s what I’m going to be digging into for most of this review just because
See full article at DailyDead »

Amy Adams to Star in Thriller 'The Woman in the Window'

Amy Adams to Star in Thriller 'The Woman in the Window'
Amy Adams is set to star in The Woman in the Window, a thriller that Darkest Hour helmer Joe Wright will direct for Fox 2000.

With a nod to the Alfred Hitchcock classic Rear Window, the source book, written by A.J. Finn, told of a child psychologist with severe agoraphobia (and a penchant for mixing alcohol with her medication) who hasn’t left her house in months. The woman witnesses a horrible crime involving a new neighboring family but no one, including the police, will believe her. And she has doubts herself.

The Woman in the Window is one of the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Rear Window”

Rear Window is a movie that’s kind of simple in that it sets up the idea of someone murdering his wife and disposing of her and someone having suspected him of it. Jefferies knows, or guesses, that Thorwald is someone to be leery of and soon enough drags everyone he knows into the act only to see them slowly but surely drop feet first into the mania he’s created. The only redeeming quality is that he’s absolutely right about his neighbor and almost has to die in order to prove it. Fortunately the movie has a happy ending as the

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Rear Window”
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Joe Wright to direct The Woman in the Window

Atonement and Darkest Hour director Joe Wright has found himself a new project, with Variety reporting that he will helm an adaptation of A.J. Finn’s bestselling novel The Woman in the Window.

The thriller follows “the reclusive Dr. Anna Fox, who spends her days holed in in her New York City brownstone, fortifying herself with too much wine, binge watching old movies, and spying on her neighbors. In the “Rear Window” vein, Anna eventually witnesses something she shouldn’t while keeping tabs on the Russell family, the seemingly picture perfect clan that lives across the way.”

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Letts (August, Osage County) is set to pen the adaptation, while Scott Rudin (No Country for Old Men) and Eli Bush (Lady Bird) are producing.

Wright – whose other credits include Pan, Hanna and Anna Karenina – is also attached to direct an adaptation of John Williams’ Stoner, which has Casey Affleck
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: ‘Number 37’

It’s very tempting to describe — but totally unfair to dismiss — Nosipho Dumisa’s “Number 37” as a well-researched master’s thesis by a student of Alfred Hitchcock. Dumisa, an award-winning South African writer-director making her feature filmmaking debut, has brazenly borrowed from “Rear Window” for her scenario about an incapacitated petty criminal who views a murder in an apartment across the way from his. And she doesn’t stop there: Even her title is a wink-wink, nudge-nudge allusion to two other Hitchcock films: “Number 13,” his famously unfinished 1922 directorial debut, and “Number Seventeen,” a minor 1932 melodrama about thieves who pick the wrong place to stash their loot.

But don’t let any of that keep you away. Far more substantial than a run-of-the-mill Hitchcock homage, “Number 37” is richly satisfying on its own terms as a singularly crafty and strikingly well-crafted thriller that signals the arrival of a promising filmmaking talent. And
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Most Likely to Murder Review: Mystery Saves Mundane Comedy

Most Likely to Murder Review: Mystery Saves Mundane Comedy
There have been quite a few movies over the years that deal with the guy who peaked in high school. That's what Most Likely to Murder, which recently made its debut at SXSW, is on the surface, but there's a murder mystery to deal with beneath that helps set it apart from others that have arrived before it. While it doesn't ever venture far enough into horror territory to be truly categorized as a horror/comedy, the thriller elements, which nod to classics from directors like Alfred Hitchcock, help breathe some extra life into what would otherwise be a pretty average sketch-comedy-type funny flick.

Most Likely to Murder centers on Billy (Adam Pally), who comes back home after his parents decided to sell his childhood home and retire. Once the coolest kid in high school, he comes back to his hometown 15 years later to find he's no longer cool and
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Escobar’s’ Diego F. Ramirez, Carlos Moreno, Laura Mora Preparing TV Slate (Exclusive)

Guadalajara, Mexico — At the 33rd Guadalajara Festival to present Laura Mora’s multi-awarded thriller “Matar a Jesus,” Colombian producer Diego F. Ramirez of 64-a Films is drawing on his experience in producing hit TV series “Escobar, The Drug Lord,” which employed 17,000 extras, for Caracol TV, to develop TV projects with Carlos Moreno and Mora.

Ramirez’s plans is to have some four projects developed by May or June this year. Aside from directing episodes of “Escobar” and Netflix-Univision series “El Chapo,” Moreno also directed a 10-episode web series for France’s Canal Plus and Spain’s Movistar + , “Blanca,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Escobar’s’ Diego F. Ramirez, Carlos Moreno, Laura Mora Preparing TV Slate (Exclusive)

‘Escobar’s’ Diego F. Ramirez, Carlos Moreno, Laura Mora Preparing TV Slate (Exclusive)
Guadalajara, Mexico — At the 33rd Guadalajara Festival to present Laura Mora’s multi-awarded thriller “Matar a Jesus,” Colombian producer Diego F. Ramirez of 64-a Films is drawing on his experience in producing hit TV series “Escobar, The Drug Lord,” which employed 17,000 extras, for Caracol TV, to develop TV projects with Carlos Moreno and Mora.

Ramirez’s plans is to have some four projects developed by May or June this year. Aside from directing episodes of “Escobar” and Netflix-Univision series “El Chapo,” Moreno also directed a 10-episode web series for France’s Canal Plus and Spain’s Movistar + , “Blanca,” toplined by Carlos Bardem, a lead in Peter Webber’s “Pickpockets” on which 64A Films provided production services.

Winner of the audience prize at the recent Cartagena Festival, Mora co-helmed all episodes of “Escobar” with Moreno, among her TV credits.

“We have been in meetings with the likes of Netflix,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Number 37': Film Review | SXSW 2018

If you’re going to steal, steal from the best. That certainly applies to South African writer-director Nosipho Dumisa, who takes the premise of one of her favorite films, Alfred Hitchcock’s voyeuristic man-in-a-wheelchair thriller Rear Window (1954), and gives it a grittier, much more sanguine spin in her debut feature Number 37. Would that her lead character, Randal Hendricks (Irshaad Ally), followed the same advice. He just borrows and takes from the worst of the worst: First from a loan shark, Emmie (Danny Ross), whose interest charges on late payments are of the life-ending variety. And second, from a bunch of...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Number 37’ SXSW First Look: Looking Out The Rear Window In Cape Town

Exclusive: With SXSW winding its way to Friday’s opening night for the 2018 edition, here comes the first look at an intriguing South African crime thriller playing the the Narrative Feature section. It’s Number 37, the feature written and directed by Nosipho Dumisa in her feature debut. The gritty pic bows Saturday at the Alamo Ritz. The plot of the Afrikaans-language pic is a homage to Hitchcock’s Rear Window and centers on Randall, a low-level criminal recently…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Berlin: Behind the Scenes With Guy Maddin’s ‘Accidence’

Berlin: Behind the Scenes With Guy Maddin’s ‘Accidence’
Packing at least a feature film’s worth of action into a sleek and compulsively rewatchable nine minutes, “Accidence” is a witty new short from Guy Maddin, Evan Johnson and Galen Johnson. The directing trio behind irreverent and affectionate “Vertigo” homage “The Green Fog,” which played in Berlin accompanied by the world premiere of “Accidence,” takes their inspiration from a different Hitchcock classic this time. With the film unfolding as one unbroken take that, at the fullest expanse of its creeping zoom-out, frames thirty balconied apartments in which dramas both mysterious and mundane unfold, it is most redolent of a Winnipegian take on “Rear Window.”

But with Toronto-based musician Ensign Broderick providing the glitchy, melancholic torch song that plays throughout, and with its looping, time-defying structure, it also has the feel of an art-project music video, like Garth Jennings’ famous spot for Rem’s “Imitation of Life.” Abounding in inventive visual detail, and littered
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Carly Chaikin, Samara Weaving Join Thriller ‘Last Moment of Clarity’

Carly Chaikin, Samara Weaving Join Thriller ‘Last Moment of Clarity’
“Mr. Robot” star Carly Chaikin and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” actress Samara Weaving have joined Brian Cox and Udo Kier in the independent thriller “Last Moment of Clarity.”

Production is underway on “Last Moment of Clarity,” the debut film of writer/director brother duo Colin and James Krisel. Andrew LevitasMetalwork Pictures is producing, with his Rogue Black shingle financing. Stephen Israel and Allan Loeb are also producing.

The story centers on a man played by Zach Avery who witnesses the murder of his fiancée, portrayed by Weaving, in Brooklyn and flees to Paris to forget. Three years later, he finds himself a paranoid drifter, until one day at a Parisian cinema, he spots an actress who, to his mind, looks uncannily like his dead ex-love.

He returns to Los Angeles, reconnects with his old friend (Chaikin), and together they try to avoid the Albanian mafia while uncovering the truth about his fiancée.

“It is a privilege
See full article at Variety - Film News »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites