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On the Waterfront ()


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An ex-prize fighter turned longshoreman struggles to stand up to his corrupt union bosses.

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Awards:
  • Won 8 Oscars. Another 21 wins & 9 nominations.
  • See more »
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Cast verified as complete

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...
Terry Malloy
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Father Barry
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Johnny Friendly
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Charley Malloy
Pat Henning ...
Kayo Dugan
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Glover
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Big Mac
Tony Galento ...
Truck
Tami Mauriello ...
Tillio
John F. Hamilton ...
'Pop' Doyle (as John Hamilton)
John Heldabrand ...
Mott
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Moose
Don Blackman ...
Luke
Arthur Keegan ...
Jimmy
Abe Simon ...
Barney
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Edie Doyle
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Gillette (uncredited)
Dan Bergin ...
Sidney (uncredited)
Zachary Charles ...
Dues Collector (uncredited)
Jere Delaney ...
Bit Part (uncredited)
Robert Downing ...
Bit (uncredited)
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Bit (uncredited)
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Slim (uncredited)
Thomas Handley ...
Tommy Collins (uncredited)
Anne Hegira ...
Mrs. Collins (uncredited)
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Jocko (uncredited)
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Mother of a Longshoreman (uncredited)
Barry Macollum ...
Johnny's Banker (uncredited)
Tiger Joe Marsh ...
Longshoreman (uncredited)
Edward McNally ...
Bit Part (uncredited)
Mike O'Dowd ...
Specs (uncredited)
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Cab Driver (uncredited)
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Longshoreman (uncredited)

Directed by

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Elia Kazan

Written by

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Budd Schulberg ... (screenplay)
 
Budd Schulberg ... (based upon an original story by)
 
Malcolm Johnson ... (suggested by articles by)
 
Robert Siodmak ... () (uncredited)

Produced by

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Sam Spiegel ... producer

Music by

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Leonard Bernstein

Cinematography by

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Boris Kaufman ... director of photography

Film Editing by

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Gene Milford

Art Direction by

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Richard Day

Makeup Department

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Mary Roche ... hair stylist
Fred Carlton Ryle ... makeup supervision (as Fred Ryle)
Bill Herman ... makeup artist (uncredited)

Production Management

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George Justin ... production manager

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Charles H. Maguire ... assistant director
Arthur Steckler ... second second assistant director (uncredited)

Art Department

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Eddie Barr ... props (uncredited)
Robert Hart ... carpenter (uncredited)

Sound Department

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Jim Shields ... sound (as James Shields)
Richard Olson ... sound editor (uncredited)
Ernest Reichert ... sound editor (uncredited)
Evelyn Rutledge ... sound editor (uncredited)

Camera and Electrical Department

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Howard Block ... assistant camera (uncredited)
Alan Stetson ... electrician (uncredited)
Felix Trimboli ... camera operator: second unit (uncredited)

Costume and Wardrobe Department

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Anna Hill Johnstone ... wardrobe supervisor
Flo Transfield ... wardrobe mistress
Ed Wynigear ... wardrobe (uncredited)

Music Department

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Gil Grau ... orchestrator (uncredited)
Ving Hershon ... music editor (uncredited)
Marlin Skiles ... orchestrator (uncredited)

Other crew

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Roberta Hodes ... script supervisor
Samuel Rheiner ... assistant to producer (as Sam Rheiner)
Guy Thomajan ... dialogue supervisor
Roger Donoghue ... boxing coach (uncredited)
Joe Hyams ... publicist (uncredited) / unit publicist (uncredited)
Dale Tate ... title designer (uncredited)
Crew verified as complete

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

Terry Malloy dreams about being a prize fighter, while tending his pigeons and running errands at the docks for Johnny Friendly, the corrupt boss of the dockers union. Terry witnesses a murder by two of Johnny's thugs, and later meets the dead man's sister and feels responsible for his death. She introduces him to Father Barry, who tries to force him to provide information for the courts that will smash the dock racketeers. Written by Colin Tinto

Plot Keywords
Taglines The Man Lived by the Jungle Law of the Docks! See more »
Genres
Parents Guide View content advisory »
Certification

Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • Crime on the Waterfront (United States)
  • Waterfront (United States)
  • The Hook (United States)
  • Bottom of the River (United States)
  • Sur les quais (France)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 108 min
Official Sites
Country
Language
Color
Aspect Ratio
Sound Mix
Filming Locations

Box Office

Budget $910,000 (estimated)
Cumulative Worldwide Gross $678,960

Did You Know?

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Trivia As part of his contract, Marlon Brando only worked till 4 every day and then he would leave to go see his analyst. Brando's mother had recently died and the conflicted young actor was in therapy to resolve his issues with his parents. Interestingly, for the film's classic scene between Rod Steiger and Brando in the back of the cab, all of Steiger's close-ups were filmed after Brando had left for the day, so his lines were read by one of the crew members. Steiger remained very bitter about that for many years and often mentioned it in interviews. See more »
Goofs In the final scene, the large ship at the dock in the background changes between a freighter and a cruise ship. See more »
Movie Connections Edited into Un Américain nommé Kazan (2018). See more »
Soundtracks Here Comes the Bride See more »
Crazy Credits Opening credits are shown over a bamboo-type mat background. See more »
Quotes Charlie: Look, kid, I - how much you weigh, son? When you weighed one hundred and sixty-eight pounds you were beautiful. You coulda been another Billy Conn, and that skunk we got you for a manager, he brought you along too fast.
Terry: It wasn't him, Charley, it was you. Remember that night in the Garden you came down to my dressing room and you said, "Kid, this ain't your night. We're going for the price on Wilson." You remember that? "This ain't your night"! My night! I coulda taken Wilson apart! So what happens? He gets the title shot outdoors on the ballpark and what do I get? A one-way ticket to Palooka-ville! You was my brother, Charley, you shoulda looked out for me a little bit. You shoulda taken care of me just a little bit so I wouldn't have to take them dives for the short-end money.
Charlie: Oh I had some bets down for you. You saw some money.
Terry: You don't understand. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it. It was you, Charley.
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