7.0/10
26,180
231 user 119 critic

Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)

G | | Horror, Sci-Fi | 5 March 1954 (USA)
Trailer
0:56 | Trailer
A strange prehistoric beast lurks in the depths of the Amazonian jungle. A group of scientists try to capture the animal and bring it back to civilization for study.

Director:

Jack Arnold

Writers:

Harry Essex (screenplay), Arthur A. Ross (screenplay) (as Arthur Ross) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
439 ( 539)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Richard Carlson ... David Reed
Julie Adams ... Kay Lawrence (as Julia Adams)
Richard Denning ... Mark Williams
Antonio Moreno ... Carl Maia
Nestor Paiva ... Lucas
Whit Bissell ... Dr. Thompson
Bernie Gozier ... Zee
Henry A. Escalante Henry A. Escalante ... Chico (as Henry Escalante)
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Storyline

A scientific expedition searching for fossils along the Amazon River discovers a prehistoric Gill-Man in the legendary Black Lagoon. The explorers capture the mysterious creature, but it breaks free. The Gill-Man returns to kidnap the lovely Kay, fiancée of one in the expedition, with whom it has fallen in love. Written by Marty McKee <mmckee@wkio.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Centuries of passion pent up in his savage heart! See more »

Genres:

Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Julie Adams performed all of her own stunts for this film. See more »

Goofs

At around 50 minutes, just after the divers enter the creature's grotto, there appear to be two pillars and perhaps part of a structure in the background that are not noticed by the characters. This anomaly may be due to reuse of a backdrop painting but I am surprised that I can't find any suggestion that other viewers have noticed it (and that there's no mention in Bill Warrens 'bible' of 1950's Sci-fi films). If some knows the answer, perhaps it could be added to the film's 'trivia' section. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: In the beginning, God created the heaven and the earth. And the Earth was without form and void. This the planet Earth, newly born and and cooling rapidly from a temperature 6,000 degrees to a few hundred in less than 5 billion years. Heat rises, meets the atmosphere, the clouds form, and rain pours down upon the hardening surface for countless centuries. The restless seas rise, find boundaries, are contained. Now, in their warm depths, the miracle of life begins. In infinite ...
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Alternate Versions

Originally shown in theatres in 3-D. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Enemy (2013) See more »

User Reviews

Lonely In The Serene Lagoon
17 February 2008 | by LechuguillaSee all my reviews

Unlike other sci-fi flicks from the 1950s, "Creature From The Black Lagoon" is not a film to laugh at. It's better made. Just by the title we know there's a monster lurking about. Yet, for the film's first 24 minutes we don't actually see it, only one of its claws. And that holding back of the monster's appearance fosters suspense and mystery. In addition, the film's B&W cinematography is good, for its time, with lots of credible underwater shots. And while the dialogue does contain lots of exposition, the film at least tries to educate viewers.

There's nothing complex about the story. A scientific crew heads for the Amazon to do an archaeological dig, after a large fossil is found. The crew ends up at the Black Lagoon, a place of serenity, with its still waters, surrounded by palm trees and the sounds of monkeys and exotic birds. Through much of the film the peaceful setting together with soothing background music actually makes for a rather relaxing movie. Even when we see the monster, it seems lonely and hardly threatening as it glides gracefully through its watery home.

I suspect that the film's popularity when it was first released relates to the creature's distinctive appearance, with those moving gills and those bulging dark eyes. And of course, back in those days, the film was made for 3-D viewing, a novelty then that made the monster seem more real. Today, the film has an ever-so-slight environmental theme, given that at least one of the scientists prefers that the monster not be harmed, and given that humans obviously are encroaching into its habitat.

Because so much of the plot takes place underwater and therefore lacks dialogue, and given a runtime of only about 78 minutes, there really isn't that much to this movie. But what there is of it is interesting for its historical significance as a precursor to later sci-fi films, and for a monster that's not only photogenic but also alone and arguably lonely in a world that has passed it by, after eons of time.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 March 1954 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Black Lagoon See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$275
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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