7.2/10
882
10 user 34 critic

Anatahan (1953)

PG | | Drama, War | 28 June 1953 (Japan)
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1:56 | Trailer
In June 1944, twelve Japanese seaman are stranded on an abandoned-and-forgotten island called An-ta-han for seven years. The island's only inhabitants are the overseer of the abandoned ... See full summary »

Writers:

Younghill Kang (novel), Michiro Maruyama (novel) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Akemi Negishi ... Keiko Kusakabe, the 'Queen Bee'
Tadashi Suganuma Tadashi Suganuma ... Kusakabe, Husband of Keiko (as Suganuma)
Kisaburo Sawamura Kisaburo Sawamura ... Kuroda (as Sawamura)
Shôji Nakayama Shôji Nakayama ... Nishio (as Nakayama)
Jun Fujikawa Jun Fujikawa ... Yoshisato (as Fujikawa)
Hiroshi Kondô Hiroshi Kondô ... Yanaginuma (as Kondo)
Shozo Miyashita Shozo Miyashita ... Sennami (as Miyashita)
Tsuruemon Bando Tsuruemon Bando ... Doi (as Tsuruemon)
Kikuji Onoe Kikuji Onoe ... Kaneda (as Kikuji)
Rokuriro Kineya Rokuriro Kineya ... Marui (as Rokuriro)
Daijiro Tamura Daijiro Tamura ... Kanzaki (as Tamura)
Chizuru Kitagawa Chizuru Kitagawa ... (as Kitagawa)
Takeshi Suzuki Takeshi Suzuki ... Takahashi (as Suzuki)
Shiro Amikura Shiro Amikura ... Amanuma (as Amikura)
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Storyline

In June 1944, twelve Japanese seaman are stranded on an abandoned-and-forgotten island called An-ta-han for seven years. The island's only inhabitants are the overseer of the abandoned plantation and an attractive young Japanese woman. Discipline is represented by a former warrant officer but ends when he suffers a loss-of-face catastrophe. Soon, discipline and rationality are replaced by a struggle for power and the woman. Power is represented by a pair of pistols found in the wreckage of an American airplane, so important that five men pay for their lives in a bid for supremacy. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Josef Von Sternberg included in this fiction movie, some footage from newsreel, showing the return of the Japanese troops after Japan surrendered in 1945. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: To look back on something is not the same as having lived it.
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Crazy Credits

In the English-language version, all of the Japanese cast and crew members except Akemi Negishi are billed solely by their last names. See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood Mavericks (1990) See more »

Soundtracks

Akatsuki ni inoru
Composed by Yûji Koseki
Sung by tired men
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User Reviews

Odd but beautiful
3 February 1999 | by mohaasSee all my reviews

This has to be one of the strangest films I have seen and its sheer oddity is one of the reasons I enjoyed it so immensely. "Anatahan" is based on the "true" story of Japanese soldiers who were shipwrecked during World War II and refused to believe that the war had ended until six years after Hiroshima. On the island with them, the soldiers find a man and woman who did not leave with the island's former inhabitants and the movie's intrigue centers around the soldiers' murderous lust towards the woman. What is so odd about the film is that the actors only speak Japanese and the viewer is led through the story by an English-speaking narrator (Sternberg, himself) who variously refers to himself as "I" and "we" but never clearly identifies who that "I" might be. The narrative is further complicated by the fact that at several crucial moments the narrator admits that no one knows what happened while we watch those events occur onscreen. These constantly shifting levels of "truth" make this film always compelling as we are overtly challenged to question what it is we are seeing and hearing. Like Orson Welles' "F for Fake," truth and artifice interact to create a complicated web of meanings which--at least in my one viewing--never provided easy answers. "Anatahan's" brand of "truth" is a precursor to more recent films like "Fargo," whose truths are meant to be taken ironically rather than as literal fact. Although this film is hard to find, try to get your hands on it if only to see the final piece in a genius director's long line of work.


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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese | English

Release Date:

28 June 1953 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

The Devil's Pitchfork See more »

Filming Locations:

Kyoto, Japan See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$8,171

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$8,171
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Daiwa See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Buenos Aires Festival Internacional de Cine Independiente)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)| Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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