A bored and sheltered princess escapes her guardians and falls in love with an American newsman in Rome.

Director:

William Wyler

Writers:

Ian McLellan Hunter (screenplay), John Dighton (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
2,961 ( 454)
Won 3 Oscars. Another 8 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Gregory Peck ... Joe Bradley
Audrey Hepburn ... Princess Ann
Eddie Albert ... Irving Radovich
Hartley Power Hartley Power ... Mr. Hennessy
Harcourt Williams ... Ambassador
Margaret Rawlings ... Countess Vereberg
Tullio Carminati ... General Provno
Paolo Carlini Paolo Carlini ... Mario Delani
Claudio Ermelli ... Giovanni
Paola Borboni ... Charwoman
Alfredo Rizzo Alfredo Rizzo ... Taxicab Driver
Laura Solari ... Hennessy's Secretary
Gorella Gori Gorella Gori ... Shoe Seller
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Storyline

Joe Bradley is a reporter for the American News Service in Rome, a job he doesn't much like as he would rather work for what he considers a real news agency back in the States. He is on the verge of getting fired when he, sleeping in and getting caught in a lie by his boss Hennessy, misses an interview with HRH Princess Ann, who is on a goodwill tour of Europe, Rome only her latest stop. However, he thinks he may have stumbled upon a huge scoop. Princess Ann has officially called off all her Rome engagements due to illness. In reality, he recognizes the photograph of her as being the young well but simply dressed drunk woman he rescued off the street last night (as he didn't want to turn her into the police for being a vagrant), and who is still in his small studio apartment sleeping off her hangover. What Joe doesn't know is that she is really sleeping off the effects of a sedative given to her by her doctor to calm her down after an anxiety attack, that anxiety because she hates her... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Lived Loved and Filmed in Rome See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The lion's mouth scene is shown in Trumbo (2015) when Dalton Trumbo and his wife are watching Roman Holiday in a local movie theater. See more »

Goofs

The flower that Ann was given by the flower seller disappears when she is sitting by the clock tower. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
News announcer: Paramount News brings you a special coverage of Princess Ann's visit to London, the first stop on her much-publicized goodwill tour of European capitals. She gets a royal welcome from the British, as thousands cheer the gracious young member of one of Europe's oldest ruling families. After three days of continuous activity and a visit to Buckingham Palace, Ann flew to Amsterdam, where Her Royal Highness dedicated the new international aid building and christened an ocean liner, ...
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Alternate Versions

The opening credits have been digitally changed on the R1 DVD release in order to include a Story credit for Dalton Trumbo, who was not credited on the original release due to the Blacklist. The 2020 Blu-Ray release went further and gave Trumbo a Screenplay credit as well. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Moskovskie kanikuly (1995) See more »

User Reviews

 
Magical romantic comedy
11 March 2017 | by gbill-74877See all my reviews

Audrey Hepburn burst onto the movie scene with this film, her first role. She plays an English Princess traveling in Rome who is bored with her official duties and the tight schedule she's on. One night after getting a tranquilizer to calm her from the stress of it all, she sneaks away into the streets of Rome. She's found by a newspaperman played by Gregory Peck, who takes her to his place to sleep it off. When he finds out who she really is, he realizes he's on top of a gold mine of a story, and enlists his photographer friend (Eddie Albert) to get candid shots of the two while they sightsee.

Hepburn and Peck are such an attractive couple, and director William Wyler gets lots of beautiful shots of Rome, including the Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps, Castel Sant'Angelo, and of course the classic scene they have at the Bocca della Verità. It all makes for a very romantic film. Hepburn played her part perfectly, expressing frustration and joy with such economy, as well as the restraint that comes from being a royal. Among several others, the scene with her getting her hair cut short is captivating, and it's no wonder that she won an Oscar for her performance. Peck's performance is also excellent, and Eddie Albert pulls off the part of a young rogue quite well despite being 47 at the time. I won't spoil the ending, except to say it's touching and poignant, and so perfectly shot in the Palazzo Colonna. At the end of the day this is 'just a romantic comedy', with its share of silliness, but it's so mature and magical, and with these stars in this setting, it stands head and shoulders above so many others.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian | German

Release Date:

2 September 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Roman Holiday See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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