2.9/10
4,095
146 user 56 critic

Robot Monster (1953)

Approved | | Sci-Fi | 25 June 1953 (USA)
The monstrous Ro-Man attempts to annihilate the last family alive on Earth, but finds himself falling for their beautiful daughter.

Director:

Phil Tucker

Writer:

Wyott Ordung (original screenplay)
Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

ON DISC
ALL

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.2/10 X  

A mad doctor attempts to create atomic supermen.

Director: Edward D. Wood Jr.
Stars: Bela Lugosi, Tor Johnson, Tony McCoy
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.2/10 X  

A psychiatrist tells two stories: one of a transvestite (Glen or Glenda), the other of a pseudohermaphrodite (Alan or Anne).

Director: Edward D. Wood Jr.
Stars: Edward D. Wood Jr., Bela Lugosi, Lyle Talbot
The Creeping Terror (TV Movie 1964)
Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2.1/10 X  

A newlywed sheriff tries to stop a shambling monster that has emerged from a spaceship to eat the citizens of an American town.

Director: Vic Savage
Stars: Vic Savage, Shannon O'Neil, William Thourlby
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1.9/10 X  

A family gets lost on the road and stumbles upon a hidden, underground, devil-worshiping cult led by the fearsome Master and his servant Torgo.

Director: Harold P. Warren
Stars: Tom Neyman, John Reynolds, Diane Adelson
Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4/10 X  

Evil aliens attack Earth and set their terrible "Plan 9" in action. As the aliens resurrect the dead of the Earth to destroy the living, our lives are in danger.

Director: Edward D. Wood Jr.
Stars: Gregory Walcott, Tom Keene, Mona McKinnon
Fantasy | Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.3/10 X  

Global panic ensues when it is revealed that a mysterious UFO is actually a giant bird that flies at supersonic speed and has no regard for life or architecture.

Director: Fred F. Sears
Stars: Jeff Morrow, Mara Corday, Morris Ankrum
Adventure | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3.7/10 X  

Astronauts travel to the moon where they discover it is inhabited by attractive young women in black tights.

Director: Arthur Hilton
Stars: Sonny Tufts, Victor Jory, Marie Windsor
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

A teenage couple accidentally awakens an alien after hitting it with their car.

Director: Edward L. Cahn
Stars: Steven Terrell, Gloria Castillo, Frank Gorshin
Zaat (1971)
Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2.5/10 X  

A mad scientist transforms himself into an aquatic killer.

Directors: Don Barton, Arnold Stevens
Stars: Marshall Grauer, Wade Popwell, Paul Galloway
Horror | Mystery | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

A woman in a hypnotic state recounts to two doctors the details of a horrific experience from her past life that began with the mysterious and sudden disappearance of her husband.

Director: Roy Del Ruth
Stars: Beverly Garland, Bruce Bennett, Lon Chaney Jr.
Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.8/10 X  

Scientists become trapped on a shrinking island with intelligent, murderous giant crabs.

Director: Roger Corman
Stars: Richard Garland, Pamela Duncan, Russell Johnson
Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2.9/10 X  

Giant spiders from another dimension invade Wisconsin.

Director: Bill Rebane
Stars: Steve Brodie, Barbara Hale, Robert Easton
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
George Nader ... Roy
Claudia Barrett ... Alice
Selena Royle ... Mother (as Selena Royale)
John Mylong ... The Professor
Gregory Moffett Gregory Moffett ... Johnny
Pamela Paulson Pamela Paulson ... Carla
George Barrows ... Ro-Man the Monster / Great Guidance
John Brown John Brown ... Ro-Man / Great Guidance (voice)
Edit

Storyline

Ro-Man, an alien that looks remarkably like a gorilla in a diving helmet, has destroyed all but six people on the planet Earth. He spends the entire film trying to finish off these survivors, but complications arise when he falls for the young woman in the group. Love that bubble machine! Written by Ray Hamel <hamel@primate.wisc.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

MOON MONSTERS LAUNCH ATTACK AGAINST EARTH! (original posters) See more »

Genres:

Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 June 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Monsters from the Moon See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$16,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$1,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

After the lightning flash we see dinosaurs battling, and the footage comes from other films. The large lizards are from One Million B.C. (1940) (Hal Roach, 1940), supervised by Roy Seawright; the one brief shot of two stop-motion triceratops fighting is from Lippert Pictures' Lost Continent (1951), animator unknown. See more »

Goofs

When Roy and Alice told Carla to go home she is going on wrong way. See more »

Quotes

[Roy walks up to the group and collapses]
The Professor: He's dead, and there's nothing we can do.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Automatic Billion Bubble Machine by N.A. Fisher Chemical Products, Inc. See more »

Alternate Versions

The 3-D Rhino Home Video print (which also include a variant pre-titles sequence) inserts a black bar over Claudia Barret's chest during the bodice-ripping sequence, leading viewers to believe something more was shown then her padded bra. The Rhino version also includes extraneous added sound effects and at least one badly-looped line of dialogue where Ro-Man says "Hmmm. Maybe I can get a date with the girl." See more »

Connections

Featured in Joan of Arcadia: Friday Night (2004) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
When the Medveds Are Right....
7 January 2006 | by theowinthropSee all my reviews

I hesitate to give this a "1" for awful, but it is - by all memories of all the bad films I ever saw - the worst I ever saw.

The Medved Brothers, back in the 1980s, listed "Robot Monster" among the 50 worst films of all time. It deserves that accolade. With dialog (serious dialog) like "I am not a human...I am a Ro - Man." said by an actor in a gorilla suit (George Barrows, the actor in the gorilla suit, actually played a gorilla in another film in a few years - it must have been one of his so-called talents), this is the nadir (I almost said Nader, for the star of the film) of bad movie making. It is poverty-row movie making.

I notice the name of Ed Wood mentioned in some of the reviews here. Wood never did a good film, but there was (I believe) a man in Wood who really felt he had some type of cinematic vision. It was not a trained one - it was quite inept. But if you look at what Wood is attempting to do in some of his films in the 1950s (tackle cross-dressing in "Glen Or Glenda", for example) one can vaguely sympathize with his having some concepts but no talent to really put them across. I think that is why Wood has somehow become a negative Hollywood legend.

That can't be said for Phil Tucker. He never seems to have gotten the bug of making just monster movies. When Wood planned "Plan Nine From Outer Space", he did intend to comment about the danger of our arms race (it comes out ludicrously in the film, but it is there). Tucker could not do that. He just could push together the typical hack like conventions to muddle through. So he has the heroine "vamp" the "Robot Monster" no matter how idiotic it looks. I have never seen Tucker's "Cape Canaveral Monster", which was his last film, but I suspect it is just a slightly smoother version of the bilge he put together here.

I do have one suspicion that makes me think this film was just a poverty row quickie without rhyme or reason (not like Wood's type of schlock which he actually agonized over at home and when filming). I noticed while looking through the credits the backgrounds and fates of the different players. The only one who went anywhere in the 1950s was George Nader, who actually may have done a good performance in one film ("Away All Boats"), but whose career petered out due to his getting involved in a homosexual scandal. He ended doing television in Germany. This film actually was his first real "lead" role. Barrows never had as "important" a role in a film as "Robot Monster". Selena Royle had done some important films in the 1940s but she was blacklisted (possibly unfairly). She did make a successful second career in Mexico (which I am glad about). John Brown was also a victim of the blacklist. Few know of it today (despite the decades of reruns of the old Burns and Allen television show) but he was on the show for a few months in 1950, replacing Hal March as the neighbor Harry Morgan. Brown, who had a distinguished career in radio comedy shows like "The Life Of Riley", was replaced by producer George Burns when his sponsor pointed out that Brown was suspected of communist sympathies. He would be replaced by Fred Clark. It is the shows with Clark and later Larry Keating that we have seen to this day. Brown kept working when he could. He died in 1957. Claudia Barrett's career died out in the 1960s. As for the two child performers, Gregory Moffett acted until about 1956, and Pamela Paulson never made another film in her life. John Mylong usually played bit-parts in films, frequently (during World War II) as Nazis (he's in "The Hitler Gang"). He does play Eddie Duchin's (Tyrone Power's) father in "The Eddie Duchin Story".

In short this cast is strictly from hunger in terms of name recognition. All, that is, except the future acting "success" Nader, and the past success Royle, and this is a rung up for the former and a last chance for the latter. When Tucker cast this picture he grabbed people who were desperate to be in anything that offered them a chance to have a speaking part of any type, no matter how silly. Now compare this with Woods - he uses Bela Lugosi again and again, because he recognizes that Lugosi has name recognition with the public, and some degree of talent left as well (though drug addiction made the latter even weaker than it was). He also uses some character actors like Lyle Talbot who have been around for awhile (the Medveds don't think highly of Talbot, as he seems somewhat humorless - actually at about the same time he worked for Wood, Talbot appeared as himself in a comic series of rivalry confrontations with Bob Cummings on the latter's successful television series "Love That Bob!"). Wood also used local television stars like Vampira and Cresswell the mentalist, and Tor Johnson the Swedish wrestler in his films. In short Wood looks like he made an effort to choose his cast with something approaching thought (for effect, for what he thought was talent). The results might have been laughable, but it showed a type of care. Tucker didn't show that. So for all the cheesiness of Wood's works, we can admire the attempt. We can't with Tucker.

The most memorable moment of this movie? The booming voice deciding to unleash prehistoric monsters on the planet (we see some kind of lizard roaming a small set - it's supposed to be a tyrannosaur?). I think it was memorable because it came about two minutes before the film ended. It still came two minutes too late.


12 of 19 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 146 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

IMDb Freedive: Watch Movies and TV Series for Free

Watch Hollywood hits and TV favorites for free with IMDb Freedive. Start streaming on IMDb and Fire TV devices today!

Start watching

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed