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Julius Caesar (1953) Poster

(1953)

Goofs

Jump to: Anachronisms (4) | Boom mic visible (1) | Continuity (6) | Miscellaneous (2) | Revealing mistakes (3)

Anachronisms 

A well-known bust of the Emperor Hadrian is prominently seen during the early dialog between Cassius and Brutus and, later, at Brutus' villa (both Cassius and Portia actually touch them). Hadrian wasn't Emperor for more than 120 years after the time in which the film takes place.
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Near the beginning of the movie, a person in the crowd is wearing eyeglasses. He walks right by Caesar.
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A stylized chess set can be seen in the home of Caesar and Calpurnia. The earliest precursor of chess did not develop until 550 A.D. in the Punjab.
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Brutus is twice seen with a book bound on one edge, in the modern form. This format, called 'codex', was not unknown at the time, but codices were far rarer than scrolls until early Christian times.
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Boom mic visible 

At the beginning of the film, when Cassius is challenging Brutus' character, a sharply defined boom mike shadow is cast on the inside wall of the arch they turn into coming off the street.
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Continuity 

Still inside Brutus' tent, the black jar on the table changes its place repeatedly between shots.
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In the beginning of the film, when Flavius is talking to workers, we see Marullus near the wall behind, with a fat man a little way on his right side. The next shot shows the fat man partly behind Marullus.
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When the soothsayer walks in the middle of the crowd to the right of the screen, we see from above when he is passing by Brutus. In the next shot he is walking towards the camera and Brutus, now behind him, grabs his arm to turn him.
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When Caesar is in the top of the stairs talking to Cassius, Brutus and others, just before he is murdered, the people behind him change between shots.
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Marc Antony's left hand changes between shots when people from the crowd ask him to read Caesar's testament.
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Inside Brutus' tent, the shield on the wall changes its position and disappears between shots.
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Miscellaneous 

Cassius offers Brutus his dagger to kill him, but the blade of his dagger falls off as he pulls it out of the sheath. Cassius offers the hilt of the dagger to Brutus, with the (missing) blade hidden behind his forearm.
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In Brutus' tent, the oil lamp is twice called a 'taper' (candle).
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Revealing mistakes 

In the scene where Antony is giving his speech to the citizens after Caesar's death, you can see the reflection of two stage lights on a bald man's head.
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During Mark Antony's soliloquy over Caesar's corpse at the foot of the statue, the corpse can clearly be seen breathing.
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When Decius Brutus comes to Caesar's home to bring him to the senate, Caesar tells Decius that his wife Calphurnia "on her knee hath begged that I will stay at home today." While this line of dialogue is verbatim from the play, in the film Calphurnia does not fall to her knees to beg Caesar, and instead remains standing, so this line of dialogue is inaccurate for Caesar to say in the context of this film.
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See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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