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It Happens Every Thursday (1953)

Approved | | Comedy, Drama | 22 April 1953 (USA)
A New York couple takes over a small town newspaper.

Director:

Joseph Pevney

Writers:

Dane Lussier (screenplay), Jane S. McIlvaine (novel) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Loretta Young ... Jane MacAvoy
John Forsythe ... Bob MacAvoy
Frank McHugh ... Fred Hawley
Edgar Buchanan ... Jake
Gregg Palmer ... Chet Dunne (as Palmer Lee)
Harvey Grant Harvey Grant ... Steve MacAvoy
Jimmy Conlin ... Matthew
Jane Darwell ... Mrs. Eva Spatch
Willard Waterman ... Myron Trout
Gladys George ... Mrs. Lucinda Holmes
Edith Evanson ... Mrs. Peterson
Edward Clark ... Homer
Kathryn Card ... Mrs. Dow
Eddy Waller ... James Bartlett
Regis Toomey ... Mayor Hull
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Storyline

New York reporter Bob MacAvoy is persuaded by pregnant wife Jane to buy a broken-down weekly newspaper in Eden, California. They have humorous problems with small town mores and eccentric citizens. But their schemes to increase circulation get them in over their heads. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

They've got a brand new baby ... a second-hand car ... and they're stuck in a one horse town!

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Loretta Young's final movie. See more »

Quotes

Mrs. Lucinda Holmes: What happened to the old goat who used to run this paper?
Bob MacAvoy: He died.
Mrs. Lucinda Holmes: He was dead when he ran it.
See more »

User Reviews

 
Delightful look at serious problems of small-town paper
12 August 2019 | by morrisonhimselfSee all my reviews

As a long-time and former journalist, I was hooked early when a character bought a copy of the magazine "Editor & Publisher," the bible of the newspaper industry -- or it was then. And was into the many years of my being in the industry. (I even wrote an article for it.) But it might not even exist now, since newspapers themselves are dying like the proverbial flies, or cutting days of publication from seven to as few as three.

What the magazine-buying character found was an ad selling a small-town weekly, the owning of which, at one time, was many a journalist's dream.

And, for some, maybe for many, the dream still exists, although it is probably more difficult now to make a living with such a publication.

Many of the difficulties shown in this movie are drawn from real life. People will not subscribe. People will not advertise.

But they by gosh expect to have their stories covered, their clubs, their sewing circles, their engagements and weddings, their schools, their churches. "And be sure to spell my name right this time: It's 'D-O-W.' With a 'D' and not a 'C.' "

(I once misspelled "Raul" as "Raoul," French vs. the correct Spanish. First rule: ASK the spelling, especially names.)

When a farmer complained about no coverage for the drought, he expressed a valid complaint. With an almost non-existent staff, a paper might not be able to cover much outside the nearest neighborhoods around the paper's office.

The editor's response here is rather extreme, even for California, and takes the story out of the mundane.

The cast in this Universal Picture is top of the line, and they are handed some excellent well-written dialogue.

I highly recommend "It Happens Every Thursday," a very good copy of which is available at YouTube.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 April 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Jede Woche neu See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$617,085 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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