6.8/10
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37 user 20 critic

City That Never Sleeps (1953)

Approved | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 12 June 1953 (USA)
Johnny Kelly, who plans on resigning from the police force and leaving his wife the next day, has a very eventful last night on duty.

Director:

John H. Auer

Writer:

Steve Fisher
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gig Young ... Johnny Kelly
Mala Powers ... Sally 'Angel Face' Connors
William Talman ... Hayes Stewart
Edward Arnold ... Penrod Biddel
Chill Wills ... Sgt. Joe - the 'Voice of Chicago'
Marie Windsor ... Lydia Biddel
Paula Raymond ... Kathy Kelly
Otto Hulett ... Sgt. John 'Pop' Kelly Sr.
Wally Cassell ... Gregg Warren
Ron Hagerthy ... Stubby Kelly
James Andelin James Andelin ... Lt. Parker
Tom Poston ... Detective (as Thomas Poston)
Bunny Kacher Bunny Kacher ... Agnes DuBois
Philip L. Boddy Philip L. Boddy ... Maitre d'Hotel
Thomas Jones Thomas Jones ... Fancy Dan
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Storyline

Chicago cop Johnny Kelly, dissatisfied with his job and marriage, would like to run away with his stripper girlfriend Angel Face, but keeps getting cold feet. During one crowded night, Angel Face decides she's had enough vacillation, and crooked lawyer Biddel has an illegal mission for Johnny that could put him in a financial position to act. But other, conflicting schemes are also in progress... Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

...from the Honky Tonks to the penthouses...the creeps, the hoods, the killers come out to war with the city!


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The building in which the robbery takes place was filmed in the Marquette Building in downtown Chicago, now a National Historic Landmark. See more »

Goofs

Stuntman Dale Van Sickel is clearly seen instead of actor William Talman in the shot where Hayes Stewart jumps over the skylight during the rooftop chase. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Sgt. Joe, the 'Voice of Chicago': I am the city, the hub and heart of America...
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Crazy Credits

This motion picture is respectfully dedicated to the police and police departments of America - a brave army of men and women who form our first line of defense in preserving our sacred principles of personal liberty and justice. We gratefully acknowledge the valuable assistance given by the City of Chicago and its police and Police Department, whose cooperation made this picture possible. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Porno (2019) See more »

User Reviews

 
A satisfying, big-city movie – sort of a Grand Hotel or Dinner At Eight gone noir
23 August 2004 | by bmacvSee all my reviews

Contrary to the croonings of Liza Minnelli and Frank Sinatra, The City That Never Sleeps is not New York, New York but Chicago, Illinois. At least it is in John H. Auer's 1953 movie of that name, sort of a noir-inflected Grand Hotel or Dinner At Eight, that opens and closes with floodlit vistas of the wedding-cake Wrigley Building. Several characters' lives intersect in an urban crime drama that even offers a touch of the fanciful.

Gig Young, at the center, plays a cop who's dissatisfied with his job and with his marriage (his wife, Paula Raymond, makes more money than he does). Off hours, he hangs around a strip club called The Silver Frolics on Wabash Avenue to see, both on stage and backstage, headliner Mala Powers. That relationship is a rocky as his marriage, and she's as unhappy with her lot as he with his (`Whaddaya want me to do? Crawl into a deep freeze?' she taunts him during yet another breakup). Then Young heads to the precinct for the graveyard shift, riding in a prowl car with a new partner he's never met before (Chill Wills, who also plays the unseen `Voice of the City').

During Young's nocturnal tour he meets up again and again with the various players in the plot. There's rich, crooked lawyer Edward Arnold, who blackmails him into burglarizing some incriminating papers; his two-timing wife, Marie Windsor; former magician turned criminal William Talman; his own brother (Ron Hagerthy) who's now Talman's apprentice; his pop (Otto Hulett), a police veteran; and a `mechanical man' (Gregg Warren) who entertains passersby in the Silver Frolics' window.

Some of the ties among the characters are up front, others furtive, to be doled out as the plots thicken. By the end (Poverty Row having learned the lessons MGM taught a couple of decades earlier in the titles cited above), there's tragedy and heartache, reappraisals and reconciliations. There's even a character who vanishes as mysteriously as he materialized – a whiff of the supernatural which curiously fails to leave any influence on the way the stories unfold.

The City That Never Sleeps shows the right breadth for a big, urban story – from Arnold's moderne penthouse to Young's middle-class flat to the raffish alleys running off Wabash Avenue. Director of photography John Russell (later to film Psycho) helps Auer out with some crafty touches (a telephone dial glowing from a flashlight shone upon it comes to mind). It's not a haunting movie, but it's a satisfying one – a title that did Republic Pictures proud.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 June 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

City That Never Sleeps See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Republic Pictures (I) See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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