5.9/10
509
13 user 6 critic

Bad for Each Other (1953)

Approved | | Drama | 24 December 1953 (USA)
A doctor returning from the Korean War to his hometown in Pennsylvania must choose what next to do with his life

Director:

Irving Rapper

Writers:

Irving Wallace (screenplay), Horace McCoy (screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Charlton Heston ... Dr. Tom Owen
Lizabeth Scott ... Helen Curtis
Dianne Foster ... Joan Lasher
Mildred Dunnock ... Mrs. Mary Owen
Arthur Franz ... Dr. Jim Crowley
Ray Collins ... Dan Reasonover
Marjorie Rambeau ... Mrs. Roger Nelson
Lester Matthews ... Dr. Homer Gleeson
Rhys Williams ... Dr. Leslie M. Scobee
Lydia Clarke ... Rita Thornburg
Chris Alcaide ... Pete Olzoneski
Robert Keys Robert Keys ... Joe Marzano
Frank Sully ... Tippy Kashko, Townsman
Ann Robinson ... Lucille Grellett
Dorothy Green ... Ada Nicoletti
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Storyline

There is no way to write a "spoiler"---is there actually somebody somewhere who, ten minutes into this 1950's film, wouldn't know where it is going and will end up---since it is a strictly written-by-the-numbers corruption and redemption meller that finds: number 1, a doctor returns from the Korean War to his Pennsylvania mining hometown, (and 2) must choose between dedicating himself to treating the suffering poor (or 3) build himself a swank office and get rich by flattering wealthy women with imaginary ailments. Throw in elements no. 5,Lizabeth Scott as a rich, spoiled, twice-divorced woman with a lip stiffer than his, and number 6, Dianne Foster as a nurse bent on helping all mankind, and there are no surprises left, especially if one take note of the name of Irving Wallace among the writers, the title and Scott billed above Foster. The only surprise here is that this film wasn't from Universal-International and directed by Douglas Sirk. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Ghost Surgeon! Forced into the medical shadow world by the love of a money-hungry woman! See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Tom tells Helen his pay is $777.48 per month, which would equate to $7,245 in 2018. See more »

Goofs

At 68 minutes Tom and Helen are in the doctor's office and are having a discussion. Tom puts on his lab coat. His coat is loosely hanging round his shoulders when Homer enters. When the camera zooms back to Tom, he is fully dressed, the coat tied with a knot at the back. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Tom Owen: [on the phone with his wife] Oh, I'm interviewing nurses, of course. Don't be silly, darling, of course she'll be fat and ugly. I do insist on good legs though.
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Soundtracks

Beautiful Dreamer
(uncredited)
Written by Stephen Foster
Whistled by Charlton Heston
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User Reviews

Nothing Special
8 January 2012 | by dougdoepkeSee all my reviews

A freshly discharged army doctor passes up practice in blue-collar hometown for big- paying practice among a city elite that includes a cool blonde dilettante.

I got this epic as part of a package claiming to be all noir. The only thing noir in this movie are the several night time shots— otherwise, no crime, no hand of fate, and no moody atmosphere. Only blonde seductress Helen (Scott) instead, and she's hardly the standard spider woman. Actually, the movie's more b&w soap opera than anything else.

That's not to say there're no redeeming features. I guess I wasn't aware of what a racket doctoring among the wealthy can be. The movie shows what a cushy pandering job it can be, treating headaches with high-priced medicines and smarmy words. And coming from a muckraker like novelist McCoy, e.g. They Shoot Horses Don't They (1969), I take it as factually based.

And surprise, surprise, to me, at least—actor Heston is quite animated as the sell-out doctor. I guess this was before he stiffened into a big-screen movie god, but whatever, he's quite persuasive in the role. Still, I thought the script made the doc's transition from honorable soldier to money-grubbing pill pusher much too easy, more like a movie device than a character change. Nonetheless, get a load of the coal mine scenes, quite realistic and well done.

But, bottom line, the story follows a familiar pattern with no surprises, suggesting a production serving mainly as a vehicle for Columbia's newest hunk.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 December 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Scalpel See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Columbia Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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