7.4/10
2,557
51 user 34 critic

99 River Street (1953)

Not Rated | | Action, Crime, Drama | 11 September 1953 (USA)
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2:11 | Trailer
A former boxer turned cab driver has to hide from the police when his badgering wife is murdered by the jewel thief she was having an affair with.

Director:

Phil Karlson

Writers:

Robert Smith (screenplay), George Zuckerman (story)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
John Payne ... Ernie Driscoll
Evelyn Keyes ... Linda James
Brad Dexter ... Victor Rawlins
Frank Faylen ... Stan Hogan
Peggie Castle ... Pauline Driscoll
Jay Adler ... Christopher
Jack Lambert ... Mickey
Glenn Langan ... Lloyd Morgan (as Glen Langan)
Eddy Waller ... Pop Durkee
John Daheim John Daheim ... Bud (as John Day)
Ian Wolfe ... Waldo Daggett
Peter Leeds Peter Leeds ... Nat Finley
William Tannen ... Director
Gene Reynolds ... Chuck
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Storyline

Having lost his heavyweight championship match, boxer Ernie Driscoll now drives a taxi for a living and earns the scorn of his nagging wife, Pauline, who blames him for her lack of social status. Involved with jewel thief Victor Rawlins, Pauline is murdered by him when she impedes his ability to fence the jewels. Blamed for his wife's murder, Ernie must track down Rawlins before he leaves the country. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Last Stop In The Waterfront's Underworld! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to an article in the 17 November 1952 edition of the Los Angeles Examiner, producer Edward Small wanted Linda Darnell to play the lead in this film. See more »

Goofs

When Ernie Driscoll leaves the stage, the shadow of a crew member is projected on the wall. See more »

Quotes

Ernie Driscoll: There are worse things than murder. You can kill someone an inch at a time.
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Connections

Referenced in Fade to Black (1980) See more »

User Reviews

 
Clearly Karlson's best film
21 January 2002 | by muddlyjamesSee all my reviews

  • Not the meandering KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL. This one has all his best elements: terse, supremely functional scenes, casual brutality, a visual style emphasizing the coarse, glaring surface of things, a view of the world as one big "con" (with actors (!) featured as moral shysters in this case), and a plot that barrels along like a freight train. It also features a surprisingly sympathetic lead character (great job of low-key acting from Payne)and believable interchanges between him and the good and bad women in the film. The ending is a marvel of staging, lighting, and camera movement. This film is the main basis of Karlson's genuine (if minor) film legacy.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

11 September 1953 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Crosstown See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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