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Monkey Business (1952)

Approved | | Comedy | 7 November 1952 (Sweden)
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A chemist finds his personal and professional life turned upside down when one of his chimpanzees finds the fountain of youth.

Director:

Howard Hawks

Writers:

Ben Hecht (screenplay), Charles Lederer (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Cary Grant ... Dr. Barnaby Fulton
Ginger Rogers ... Mrs. Edwina Fulton
Charles Coburn ... Mr. Oliver Oxley
Marilyn Monroe ... Miss Lois Laurel
Hugh Marlowe ... Hank Entwhistle
Henri Letondal Henri Letondal ... Dr. Jerome Kitzel
Robert Cornthwaite ... Dr. Zoldeck
Larry Keating ... G.J. Culverly
Douglas Spencer ... Dr. Brunner
Esther Dale ... Mrs. Rhinelander
George Winslow ... Little Indian
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Storyline

Barnaby Fulton is a research chemist working on a fountain of youth pill for a chemical company. While trying a sample dose on himself, he accidentally gets a dose of a mixture added to the water cooler and believes his potion is what is working. The mixture temporarily causes him to feel and act like a teenager, including correcting his vision. When his wife gets a dose that is even larger, she regresses even further into her childhood. When an old boyfriend meets her in this state, he believes that her never wanting to see him again means a divorce and a chance for him. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

It's Some Fun!

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 November 1952 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Darling I Am Growing Younger See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The neighborhood through which Cary Grant and Marilyn Monroe go joy-riding in an MG sports car before crashing into a moving van is Brentwood, California, which is immediately adjacent to the 20th Century-Fox back-lot where this film was shot. See more »

Goofs

When one of the chimps gets out of her cage and messes around with chemicals, before the action cuts away to three scientists discussing a hair restoring formula, the large vial into which the ape has been pouring the chemicals is full to the brim. When it cuts back to the Chimp in the laboratory, the same vial is only 2/3 full. See more »

Quotes

Barnaby: Hey. You know, you're alright.
Mrs. Edwina Fulton: How do you like your eggs?
Barnaby: How did eggs get into the conversation?
Mrs. Edwina Fulton: You're hungry aren't you?
See more »

Crazy Credits

During the opening credits, an offscreen voice twice says, "Not yet, Cary" when Barnaby (Cary Grant) opens his front door to come outside. Each time, he closes the door again so the credits can continue. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Cinema Snob: Going Bananas (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

The Whiffenpoof Song
(uncredited)
Music by Tod B. Galloway
Lyrics by George S. Pomeroy and Meade Minnigerode
Sung by Cary Grant
Also sung by Ginger Rogers
Also sung by Ginger Rogers, Charles Coburn and the Executive Board
See more »

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User Reviews

 
More fun than a barrel of monkeys...
31 March 2002 | by gaityrSee all my reviews

Buoyed by the tremendous energy of Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers, MONKEY BUSINESS is a charming throwback to the screwball era of the 1930s and 40s. You know that you're being asked to leave reality behind and just settle back for a good laugh the second the film begins, especially when the narrator repeatedly warns Cary from beginning the film before the credits are done rolling! Directed with great skill by Howard Hawks (mastermind of brilliant films such as 'Bringing Up Baby' and 'His Girl Friday'), the film shares the trademark rapidfire dialogue and zany situations typical of most Hawksian comedies. As always, following the conversation between the characters is more than enough to leave the viewer breathless... One example, out of so many, is the scene in Room 304, when young!Edwina loses her temper and the couple squabble about Hank Entwistle and she finally locks Barnaby out of the room--to hilarious and painful effect!

As with most screwball comedies, the premise of the film must first be accepted, since the entire film is a logical development from the original (zany) premise. In 'Monkey Business', Barnaby Fulton is working on the development of some kind of youth elixir, which he is testing on chimpanzees. Unbeknownst to him, one of his test subjects escapes his cage and successfully concocts the potion, leaving it in the water fountain. Of course, when Barnaby tests the potion on himself, he drinks some water to get the bitter taste out of his mouth--and almost immediately becomes about 20 years old mentally and physically. Before the elixir wears off, Barnaby gets a funky new haircut, coat and car, all with his boss' sexy young secretary (Marilyn Monroe, who else?) at his side. His wife Edwina (Ginger Rogers) then gets in on the action, taking some of the elixir to allow Barnaby to make scientific observations about someone else's reaction to it. It isn't long before she drags her husband to their honeymoon hotel, dances the night away, and impetuously starts divorce proceedings when he upsets her. The ending is a terrific exercise in belief-suspension, as the rejuvenated Barnaby and Edwina (simultaneously, this time) engage in paint wars, hair-pulling and scalping.

The best part of the film really would have to be the central performance given by Cary Grant as Barnaby Fulton. He's evidently one of Hawks's favourite actors, and for good reason too--he makes the trippiest of dialogue sound perfectly natural, and plays science-geeks and debonair reporters equally convincingly. With Barnaby, the viewer is instantly reminded of David Huxley, a role Cary Grant infused with life about 15 years ago in Bringing Up Baby. Just as David is kickstarted to life by Susan, Barnaby is youthened by the elixir, and in both films, it's a delight to watch the transformation take place. Initially, Grant's Barnaby is as stuffy as you can imagine a scientist--he's absent-minded and somewhat stern; in effect, all 'grown-up'. But the moment the youth elixir kicks in, the change is miraculous yet believable. Watch in delight as Barnaby flips an effortless cartwheel; drives like a daredevil; and conducts an entire chorus of children in a rousing war song. The 'joie de vivre' that Grant infuses his character with is almost palpable.

Cary Grant is also capably matched by Ginger Rogers in their second film together. Her ability to turn into a little girl is charming in the extreme, and you can see the years drop off her in her final stint as young Edwina... it's so evident that she's having fun as she tap-dances through the hotel, or flips rubber bands at people, chews gum, and scribbles "Barnaby loves Edwina" across the conference room chalkboard.

In general, the film itself is a little uneven: it has brilliant and hilarious moments, but you definitely get the feeling that much of the film is coasting on the considerable energy and skill of its cast--a splendid Cary Grant, a lovely Ginger Rogers, and an intriguingly young Marilyn Monroe. You probably won't be in too much of a hurry to rewatch this film once you've seen it the first time, but there's really no reason to put off your first viewing... so what are you waiting for?


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