6.0/10
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49 user 15 critic

Jack and the Beanstalk (1952)

Passed | | Comedy, Family, Fantasy | 12 April 1952 (USA)
Trailer
2:44 | Trailer
Abbott & Costello's version of the famous fairy tale, about a young boy who trades the family cow for magic beans.

Director:

Jean Yarbrough

Writers:

Nathaniel Curtis (screenplay) (as Nat Curtis), Pat Costello (story)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bud Abbott ... Mr. Dinkel / Mr. Dinkelpuss (as Abbott)
Lou Costello ... Jack / Jack Strong (as Costello)
Buddy Baer ... Police Sgt. Riley / The Giant
Dorothy Ford ... Receptionist / Polly
Barbara Brown Barbara Brown ... Mrs. Strong
David Stollery ... Donald Larkin
William Farnum ... The King
Johnny Conrad Johnny Conrad ... Dancer
Shaye Cogan Shaye Cogan ... Eloise Larkin / Princess Eloise (Darlene)
James Alexander ... Arthur / Prince Arthur
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Storyline

Abbott & Costello's version of the famous fairy tale, about a young boy who trades the family cow for magic beans.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

song | singer | singing | dancer | dancing | See All (117) »

Taglines:

The last word in laughs! See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The car Bud Abbott and Lou Costello are driving in the early black-and-white section of the movie is a 1951 Henry J, which was manufactured by the Kaiser-Frazer Motor Co. and named for founder Henry J. Kaiser. In addition to being bought from an authorized dealer, the car could also be ordered through the Sears-Roebuck mail-order catalog, although its name was changed from "Henry J" to "Allstate". See more »

Goofs

All the cooking utensils and many of the other items (including wall decorations) are normal-sized (not giant-sized) in the castle. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Donald: Come in. Oh, it's you. I'm sorry, Arthur, I thought it was the babysitter.
Arthur: Just what do you have against babysitters?
See more »

Crazy Credits

Instead of the usual "The characters and events depicted are fictitious, etc." disclaimer, are these four simple words, "This is a fable". See more »

Alternate Versions

Original press screenings featured a print that ran 83 minutes and 45 seconds. An uncut 35mm preview print survives in a private archive, but has not been released on DVD. The deleted sequences include some dialogue between Jack and his mother about how to bid while selling the cow and his strange choice to give a male name to a cow; an extra section of 'Dreamer's Cloth' sung by the Princess and the complete song 'Darlene'. Some video versions have parts of the missing scenes, but not all missing sequences. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Colgate Comedy Hour: Episode #2.32 (1952) See more »

Soundtracks

He Never Looked Better In His Life
Written by Lester Lee and Bob Russell
Sung by the Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, James Alexander, Shaye Cogan and Villagers
Danced by Johnny Conrad and The Johnny Conrad Dancers
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User Reviews

 
JACK AND THE BEANSTALK (Jean Yarbrough, 1952) **1/2
28 December 2007 | by Bunuel1976See all my reviews

I had watched this previously (at secondary school, of all places!) and recall not liking it all that much. However, I was more amenable to it this time around – perhaps because it came hot on the heels of a similar film pitting a comedy act in a fairy-tale setting, i.e. the self-explanatory SNOW WHITE AND THE THREE STOOGES (1961); here, of course, it's Abbott & Costello we're talking about.

The film utilizes the sepia-into-color transition popularized by THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939) between its modern-day bookends and the period-set main narrative; less welcome are the entirely resistible love interest and musical numbers, seemingly compulsory ingredients of this type of family-oriented fare but which now date them most of all! As usually happens, too, most of the characters who appear in the fairy-tale also turn up in 'real life' – including, in this case, the Giant (played by Buddy Bear from the afore-mentioned SNOW WHITE AND THE THREE STOOGES) who also fills in for a burly cop whom the pint-sized Lou Costello aggravates!

The stars are amiable as always and manage to adapt their standard characterizations to the requirements of the familiar formula. Incidentally, this proved to be the boys' fourth of five films with director Yarborough – and one of only two A&C vehicles to be made in color (the other being the similarly adventurous ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET CAPTAIN KIDD [1952]). Atypically for them, this was not a Universal production – but rather an independent one distributed through Warner Bros., which explains its public domain status!

Finally, I really ought to spring for those four "Abbott & Costello" DVD collections from Universal one of these days – plus I still have a handful of filmed fairy tales/children's classics to go through during this Christmas period...


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 April 1952 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Jack and the Beanstalk See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$683,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TCM print) | (restored)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Black and White (Sepiatone)| Color (Supercinecolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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