6.9/10
3,060
26 user 17 critic

Hans Christian Andersen (1952)

Trailer
2:38 | Trailer

On Disc

at Amazon

The opening scene of the movie describes it best: "Once upon a time there lived in Denmark a great storyteller named Hans Christian Andersen. This is not the story of his life, but a fairy tale about the great spinner of fairy tales."

Director:

Charles Vidor

Writers:

Moss Hart (screenplay), Myles Connolly (based on a story by)
Reviews
Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Danny Kaye ... Hans Christian Andersen
Farley Granger ... Niels
Zizi Jeanmaire ... Doro (as Jeanmaire The Famous French Ballerina)
Joseph Walsh ... Peter (as Joey Walsh)
Philip Tonge ... Otto
Erik Bruhn Erik Bruhn ... The Hussar - Danced by
Roland Petit Roland Petit ... The Prince in 'The Little Mermaid' Ballet
John Brown John Brown ... Schoolmaster
John Qualen ... Burgomaster
Jeanne Lafayette Jeanne Lafayette ... Celine
Robert Malcolm ... Stage Doorman
George Chandler ... Farmer
Fred Kelsey ... First Gendarme
Gil Perkins ... Second Gendarme
Peter J. Votrian Peter J. Votrian ... Lars (as Peter Votrian)
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Storyline

A completely fabricated biography of the famous Danish fairytale writer Hans Christian Andersen featuring several of his stories and a ballet performance of "The Little Mermaid". Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The glorious story of the greatest storyteller of them all!


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

MGM

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 August 1953 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Hans Christian Andersen et la danseuse See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$13,080,000, 31 December 1952
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Goldwyn's wife, Frances Howard, would often travel to New York city, scouting Broadway productions, looking for both onstage and backstage talent. During Frances' trip in 1941 to see the Kurt Weill-Ira Gershwin-Moss Hart new musical "Lady in The Dark", she discovered Danny Kaye. Returning to Hollywood, she insisted that Goldwyn put Kaye under contract. After Kaye arrived in Hollywood, several screen tests were made and studied, to determine the best possible path for his future. They felt that the major problem with Kaye's appearance, besides his nose, was his natural dark-brown hair. Frances, upon seeing Kaye's screen tests, dictated to her husband, "They have to change his hair color! Turn Danny into a red-headed strawberry blond!" Nonetheless, Goldwyn's studio press agent always insisted Kaye's hair was its natural color. See more »

Goofs

In the song 'The King is in the Altogether", Hans twists his cap to one side and this is shown in close-up. In the next long-shot the cap is immediately straight again. See more »

Quotes

Hans: You know, I never saw such a worrier as you, Peter. You want to worry? I'll give you something to worry about. Two years ago I took you out of that orphanage and promised them I'd make you into a good cobbler. Two whole years! Look at that shoe. Glue's all smeared, the nails go in crooked. Two years an apprentice and still the nails go in crooked.
Peter: I'm not as bad as all that, am I? You're not going to send me back, are you?
Hans: Ah! A new worry appears in the sky.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits: "Once upon a time there lived in Denmark a great storyteller named Hans Christian Andersen. This is not the story of his life, but a fairy tale about this great spinner of fairy tales." See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Muppet Show: Rich Little (1977) See more »

Soundtracks

The King's New Clothes
(1952) (uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Frank Loesser
Sung by Danny Kaye and children
Reprised by Kaye, children, and Chorus in the Finale
See more »

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User Reviews

 
A sugary children's movie? -actually, it's rather daring
18 July 1999 | by SpleenSee all my reviews

Every single biopic of a creative artist tells the same story, whether it's true or not: the Philistine World, or some part thereof, rejects the artist, and fails to see his greatness; but later on, perhaps during his lifetime, perhaps not, it sees the error of its ways. That happens here. Hans Christian Andersen is a village cobbler whose compulsive inventiveness is little thought of until he makes good in Copenhagen, after which...

But there's much more going on.

There's no doubt that Andersen was a great artist, in some sense. `The Ugly Duckling' and `The Emperor's New Clothes' are two of the greatest short stories - fables, folktales - all of these - ever composed. But he had his limitations. There were many kinds of stories he just couldn't write. His fertile talent for anthropomorphising was often a millstone. In many respects he seems to have been a childish and naive man. But get this: all of these limitations make it onto the screen. Both the story and Danny Kaye's performance (a great performance) make Andersen into a human being who is NOT the greatest storyteller since Shakespeare, but who can be admired for what he is.

The main story isn't the `unrecognised genius' bit: it's a story of unrequited love. While in Copenhagen Andersen spends most of his time banging his head against the wall over an unattainable ballerina, whose interest in him is, as they say, purely professional. He manages to be quite cruel to a close friend in the process, right up to the point where it's unclear that a reconciliation is possible. (Indeed, it's unclear whether or not one occurs.) When he realises what a fool he's been he just trudges back, defeated, to his village. And it's here we have the obligatory scene where the villagers realise how great he was after all, mainly by singing the highly memorable refrains of the movie's songs, one after the other. Well, the film needed some ending. I'm inclined to forgive this one.

There's also a lengthy Little Mermaid ballet - seven minutes long? more? - danced in its entirety. (We see a LOT of the ballerina's craft in Copenhagen.) This sort of thing wasn't too unusual in the 1950s but it's a genuine gamble in context - and one that I think pays off. By the time the ballet appears the cheery story of an eccentric village storyteller had become surprisingly dark. Vidor, it seems, would rather risk having people leave the cinema than insult those who remain. Good for him. I can't claim that this film works in every respect, and perhaps you won't like it, but I'm sure you won't feel cheated by it.


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