6.8/10
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4 user 1 critic

Fargo (1952)

The brother (House Peters Jr.) of rancher Bill Martin (Bill Elliott) is killed in a stampede started by cattleman. Bill returns to the Fargo country to take his brother's place and is ... See full summary »

Director:

Lewis D. Collins

Writers:

Jack DeWitt (story and screenplay), Joseph F. Poland (story and screenplay) (as Joseph Poland)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bill Elliott ... Bill Martin (as Wild Bill Elliott)
Myron Healey ... Red Olsen
Phyllis Coates ... Kathy MacKenzie
Fuzzy Knight ... Tad Sloan
Arthur Space ... Austin
Jack Ingram ... MacKenzie - Rancher
Robert J. Wilke ... Link - Henchman (as Robert Wilke)
Terry Frost ... Alvord - Henchman
Robert Bray ... Ed Murdock
Denver Pyle ... Carey
Tim Ryan ... Sam
Florence Lake ... Maggie
Stanley Andrews ... Judge Bruce
Richard Reeves ... Bartender
Gene Roth ... Blacksmith (as Eugene Roth)
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Storyline

The brother (House Peters Jr.) of rancher Bill Martin (Bill Elliott) is killed in a stampede started by cattleman. Bill returns to the Fargo country to take his brother's place and is welcomed by law-abiding cattleman MacKenzie (Jack Ingram)) and his daughter Kathy (Phyllis Coates). The leader of the ruthless cattle interests are townsman Austin (Arthur Space) and his henchmen Red (Myron Healey), Link (Robert J. Wilke) and Albord (Terry Frost). Bill has the idea of putting up barbed wire to keep the herds from been driven over the land cultivated by the farmers. He, aided by Tad Sloan (Fuzzy Knight), produces the wire by make-shift methods, but it proves effective. The cattleman charge in court that the wire is dangerous to their herds but lose the case. Austin orders his men to seize Bill, bale him in strands of the wire, and throw him on the stage of the town hall during a fall festival. Bill doesn't take kindly to this and it precipitates open war. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Taglines:

Action in the TOUGHEST TERMINAL IN THE WEST! (original print ad - mostly caps) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 September 1952 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Guerra no Sertão See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Silvermine Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Black and White (Sepiatone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
the stereotype western cast makes the movie
6 March 2017 | by daviddaphneredSee all my reviews

The movie was exciting and had a good story line, but I feel the cast is what sold this 1952 "B" western. Bill Elliott was my favorite cowboy actor, and he did well as the low-keyed-yet-very tough, determined rancher. Kermit Maynard was excellent as the rancher sometimes at odds with Elliott yet basically his friend. To state it mildly, Phyllis Coates was a very attractive attention-getting icon as Ken Maynard's daughter and Elliott's lover, as she was in other movies with him. (Oh! She was adorable!) As for the villains, Robert Wilke and Myron Healey were mean outlaws par excellence: you almost have to feel sorry for those two who were primarily portrayed as crooks during their film careers. And Stanley Andrews, later to be known as the Old Ranger on "Death Valley Days" fell well into his role as the judge. Truly, this was a well-amassed cast for a movie of its kind. In this movie whose story line centered around the rancher (Elliott) wanting to ward off cattle stampedes by building barbed-wire fences, there was no dearth of action. Yes, the movie was very exciting and rather tense all the way through. It was for me personally very much of a favorite.


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