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Unknown  
1957   1956   1954  
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Walter O'Keefe ...  Himself - Host 1 episode, 1954
Glenn Boyington Glenn Boyington ...  Himself - Guest 1 episode, 1956
Vic Damone ...  Himself 1 episode, 1957
Mason Gross Mason Gross ...  Himself 1 episode, 1957
Sam Levenson Sam Levenson ...  Himself - Host 1 episode, 1957
Ed McMahon ...  Himself - On Screen Announcer 1 episode, 1957
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non fiction | number in title | See All (2) »

Genres:

Family | Game-Show

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 September 1952 (USA) See more »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Aired on Tuesday nights. See more »

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User Reviews

Herb Shriner, an early television version of Will Rogers
13 February 2006 | by krorieSee all my reviews

My father had three favorite comedians, Red Skelton, Bob Hope, and Herb Shriner. Herb Shriner was unlike the former two in that his humor was more topical, similar in many ways to the humor of Will Rogers. Just as Will Rogers spoke with a strong Oklahoma accent, so Herb Shriner spoke with a pronounced Hoosier accent. He often talked of Indiana even though he was actually born in Toledo, Ohio. Whereas Will Rogers used a newspaper as a prop, Herb Shriner used a harmonica, which he sometimes played.

Most viewers such as my father tuned in to "Two for the Money" not for the game but for Herb Shriner's humor, much as they tuned in to "You Bet Your Life" to hear Graucho Marx's wisecracks. I only remember "Two for the Money" with Herb Shriner (1952-1956) since we got our first TV set in 1953. Herb was the show so I don't really remember much about the game itself.

Being a youngster in those days, I enjoyed games such as Monopoly and Clue. The television game programs also marketed board games based on their shows. I had several of them including my favorite "A Dollar a Second." As I recall there was a game board marketed for "Two for the Money." Television quiz shows were all the rage in the early 50's before they got out of hand leading to the scandals later in the decade.


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