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The Great Caruso (1951)

This film traces the life of tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921). He loves Musetta, in his home town of Naples, and then Dorothy, the daughter of one of the Metropolitan Opera's patrons. Caruso... See full summary »

Director:

Richard Thorpe
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mario Lanza ... Enrico Caruso
Ann Blyth ... Dorothy Benjamin
Dorothy Kirsten ... Louise Heggar
Jarmila Novotna ... Maria Selka
Richard Hageman Richard Hageman ... Carlo Santi
Carl Benton Reid ... Park Benjamin
Eduard Franz ... Giulio Gatti-Casazza
Ludwig Donath ... Alfredo Brazzi
Alan Napier ... Jean de Reszke
Pál Jávor ... Antonio Scotti (as Paul Javor)
Carl Milletaire Carl Milletaire ... Gino
Shepard Menken Shepard Menken ... Fucito
Vincent Renno Vincent Renno ... Tullio
Nestor Paiva ... Egisto Barretto
Peter Price Peter Price ... Caruso (as boy) (as Peter Edward Price)
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Storyline

This film traces the life of tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921). He loves Musetta, in his home town of Naples, and then Dorothy, the daughter of one of the Metropolitan Opera's patrons. Caruso is unacceptable to both women's fathers: to one, because he sings; to Dorothy's, because he is a peasant. To New York patricians, Caruso is short, barrel chested, loud, emotional, unrefined. Their appreciation comes slowly. The film depicts Caruso's lament that "the man does not have the voice, the voice has the man": he cannot be places he wants to be, because he must be elsewhere singing, including the day his mother dies. Throughout, Mario Lanza and stars from the Met sing. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Taglines:

TIME MAGAZINE says" "New Idol! Hottest Singer to hit the sound tracks in a decade." See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama | Music

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In October 1951, MGM was distributing this film on the drive-in theater circuit on a double bill with the Lassie movie The Painted Hills (1951). See more »

Goofs

Opening credits: The events, characters and firms depicted in this photoplay are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, or to actual firms is purely coincidental. Says it ALL. See more »

Quotes

Enrico Caruso: It is true, Señor Barretto, that right now I sing for pennies. Pennies are not very important in a big house like this. But the singing, that is important everywhere. It makes people feel good inside, takes away the ugliness, the sadness, and it fills the empty place here. That too is something Señor, isn't it?
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits: The events, characters and firms depicted in this photoplay are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, or to actual firms is purely coincidental. See more »

Connections

Referenced in José Carreras: My Barcelona (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Trio Finale
(uncredited)
from "AIDA"
Performed by Mario Lanza
Also performed by Dorothy Kirsten and Blanche Thebom
Written by Giuseppe Verdi
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User Reviews

The Perfect Introduction to Opera
5 February 2003 | by derekmcgovernSee all my reviews

This movie can truly be called life-changing. It certainly changed my life; I was totally ignorant of opera before a chance re-run of this movie introduced me to a whole new musical world. As it turned out, I was in illustrious company. There is not a single contemporary tenor of note who was not inspired by this movie.

Let's be honest from the outset: the movie bears little resemblance to the real Caruso's life, and, yes, it is corny in the grand tradition of Hollywood musicals. But who cares? Lanza's singing is perfection itself, and his vibrant personality overflows in practically every scene. The rest of the cast is good, with top-notch operatic singers Blanche Thebom, Giuseppe Valdengo, et al providing Lanza with some worthy (and rare) vocal support.

Highlights include a superb Vesti la Giubba, a moving Ave Maria and a rapturous Because. In all the movie contains 27 vocal items, with not a dull moment to be found amongst them.

See this movie and revel in a unique vocal talent. In the words of one admirer, Mario Lanza could "outsing the entire Mormon Tabernacle Choir", and the movie is a stark reminder of how bland today's singing idols really are. Enrico Caruso, Jr, was one observer who concurred with this view.While the movie overlooked his existence in favor of his half-sister Gloria, Caruso's son had nothing but praise for the man who portrayed his father:

"Mario Lanza was born with one of the dozen or so great tenor voices of the century, with a natural gift for placement, an unmistakable and very pleasing timbre, and a nearly infallible musical instinct conspicuously absent in the overwhelming majority of so-called 'great' singers. His diction was flawless, matched only by the superb Giuseppe di Stefano. His delivery was impassioned, his phrasing manly, and his tempi instinctively right -- qualities that few singers are born with and others can never attain.

"I can think of no other tenor, before or since Mario Lanza, who could have risen with comparable success to the challenge of playing Caruso in a screen biography."

Well said, Enrico Jnr, and viva il grande Lanza!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

17 August 1951 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

The Great Caruso See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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