6.7/10
1,255
31 user 12 critic

Go for Broke! (1951)

The story of Japanese-American soldiers who fought in Europe during World War II.

Director:

Robert Pirosh

Writer:

Robert Pirosh
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Van Johnson ... Lt. Michael Grayson
Lane Nakano Lane Nakano ... Sam
George Miki George Miki ... Chick
Akira Fukunaga Akira Fukunaga ... Frank
Ken K. Okamoto Ken K. Okamoto ... Kaz
Henry Oyasato Henry Oyasato ... Ohhara
Harry Hamada Harry Hamada ... Masami
Henry Nakamura ... Tommy
Warner Anderson ... Col. Charles W. Pence
Don Haggerty ... Sgt. Wilson I. Culley
Gianna Maria Canale ... Rosina (as Gianna Canale)
Dan Riss ... Capt. Solari
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Storyline

A tribute to the U.S. 442nd Regimental Combat Team, formed in 1943 by Presidential permission with Japanese-American volunteers. We follow the training of a platoon under the rueful command of Lt. Mike Grayson who shares common prejudices of the time. The 442nd serve in Italy, then France, distinguishing themselves in skirmishes and battles; gradually and naturally, Grayson's prejudices evaporate with dawning realization that his men are better soldiers than he is. Not preachy. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Go For Broke! (means shoot the works!) See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is one of a handful of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer productions of the 1950-1951 period whose original copyrights were never renewed and are now apparently in Public Domain; for this reason this title is now offered, often in very inferior copies, at bargain prices, by numerous VHS and DVD distributors who do not normally handle copyrighted or Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer material. See more »

Goofs

Railroad freight cars in French village are American style four axle types. European railroads use two axle freight cars. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Japanese-American Soldier: Kanakas. The ones from Hawaii. You know what they call us mainlanders? Kotonks. The way they tell it if you rap on our heads it's like hitting a coconut. Hollow heads, you know? Kotonk, kotonk, kotonk.
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Connections

Featured in Poltergeist (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

The Meaning of Love
Written by Robert Pirosh, Alberto Colombo and Ken K. Okamoto
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User Reviews

 
Well Done
12 February 2004 | by surfingdaveSee all my reviews

I have known about this film since I was young, but it was not until a "dull drab army day" overseas did I actually get to view it. I was impressed with the film. It was nice to see a film from the 1950's talk about ethnic/race relations in a positive way. I thought the message that World War Two was a war for all Americans was good. The film showed that it didn't matter what ethnicity, race, or creed you are, freedom is for all, that all discrimination is barbarism and immoral. It was really encouraging to see the Lieutenant's change of heart and mind by the end of the film. I also, thought it was good that the film was not preachy. Some of the light humor was also well done. Overall I would recommend this film to anybody. This film is based on true events and true people. I would like to thank all those men and women who served our nation in that war. All gave some, and some gave all. This film was a tribute to one group of soldiers that many have not heard of.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Release Date:

14 September 1951 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

Go for Broke! See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,337,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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