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Back to One, Episode Six: Lee Grant on Strasberg vs. Meisner, Being Directed by Mike Nichols and More

I finished Lee Grant’s incredible autobiography I Said Yes To Everything right before sitting down with her and that was a huge mistake, only because it was frustrating to have such a limited time with the legendary actress after reading her extraordinary story. Consider this episode a tiny drop in the ocean of this astounding life. She was nominated for an Oscar for her first screen role in William Wyler’s Detective Story and then was blacklisted by Huac for 12 long, painful years. She rebuilt her career with roles in Peyton Place, In The Heat Of The Night, and Shampoo […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Back to One, Episode Six: Lee Grant on Strasberg vs. Meisner, Being Directed by Mike Nichols and More

I finished Lee Grant’s incredible autobiography I Said Yes To Everything right before sitting down with her and that was a huge mistake, only because it was frustrating to have such a limited time with the legendary actress after reading her extraordinary story. Consider this episode a tiny drop in the ocean of this astounding life. She was nominated for an Oscar for her first screen role in William Wyler’s Detective Story and then was blacklisted by Huac for 12 long, painful years. She rebuilt her career with roles in Peyton Place, In The Heat Of The Night, and Shampoo […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Kirk Douglas, 101, Took to the Stage With Daughter-in-Law Catherine Zeta-Jones

  • Popsugar
Kirk Douglas, 101, Took to the Stage With Daughter-in-Law Catherine Zeta-Jones
Kirk Douglas took to the stage Sunday night at the 2018 Golden Globes alongside his daughter-in-law Catherine Zeta-Jones to present the award for best screenplay. The 101-year-old actor, director, and producer is a three-time Golden Globe nominee and one-time winner of the award. Douglas is well known for movies like Stanley Kubrick's Spartacus, Lust For Life, and Detective Story. The presentation served as a mini tribute to the Hollywood legend, who just celebrated his 101st birthday in December 2017. He also received the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 1968 Golden Globes (the same honor Oprah Winfrey took home this year) for his lifetime achievements throughout the "Golden Age" of Hollywood.
See full article at Popsugar »

101-Year-Old Kirk Douglas Receives Standing Ovation While Presenting a Golden Globe

101-Year-Old Kirk Douglas Receives Standing Ovation While Presenting a Golden Globe
He is Spartacus!  Normally standing ovations are reserved for the night's winners, but at the 2018 Golden Globe Awards the A-list audience honored 101-year-old screen great Kirk Douglas when he came on stage to present the award for Best Motion Picture Screenplay with his daughter-in-law Catherine Zeta-Jones. Before he came on a stage in his wheelchair, a brief montage of Douglas' career played for the crowd showing scenes Spartacus, Lust for Life, Detective Story and more. Daniel Day-Lewis, Gal Gadot, Steven Spielberg, William H. Macy and many more rose to their feet to applaud the aging actor and his illustrious career.  Zeta Jones briefly introduced the esteemed actor, who...
See full article at E! Online »

Kirk Douglas and Daughter-In-Law Catherine Zeta-Jones Appear On Golden Globes Stage Together

Kirk Douglas and Daughter-In-Law Catherine Zeta-Jones Appear On Golden Globes Stage Together
Catherine Zeta-Jones joins her father-in-law Kirk Douglas on stage to present the award for Best Screenplay – Motion Picture! #GoldenGlobes pic.twitter.com/G7ufNHH1Gq

— Golden Globe Awards (@goldenglobes) January 8, 2018

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Kirk Douglas was welcomed with a standing ovation when he was accompanied on stage by daughter-in-law, Catherine Zeta-Jones, at the Golden Globes Sunday.

The 101-year-old actor and his son Michael Douglas’ wife joined together to present the award for best screenplay for a motion picture.

Zeta-Jones began her presentation by honoring Douglas, who she called a “living Hollywood legend,” for being recognized by the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Netflix Doc ‘The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson’: Did Director David France Steal a Filmmaker’s Research?

Netflix Doc ‘The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson’: Did Director David France Steal a Filmmaker’s Research?
Netflix debuted “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson” on Oct. 6, but filmmaker Reina Gossett claims that the documentary’s director, David France, appropriated her idea and research for the project.

“David got inspired to make this film from a grant application video that Sasha [Wortzel] and I made and sent to Kalamazoo/Arcus Foundation social justice center while he was visiting,” Gossett wrote in a statement, shared today on Twitter by author and activist Janet Mock. “He told the people who worked there — I shit you not — that he should be the one to do this film.”

She then alleged that to make his film and secure a grant from the Sundance Institute and the Arcus Foundation, France pilfered her contacts as well as her work on advocacy group Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries. Additionally, Gossett wrote that France convinced Vimeo to take down a video she’d uploaded of
See full article at Indiewire »

‘You Were Never Really Here’ First Trailer: Discover Why Lynne Ramsay and Joaquin Phoenix Won Big At Cannes

‘You Were Never Really Here’ First Trailer: Discover Why Lynne Ramsay and Joaquin Phoenix Won Big At Cannes
You Were Never Really Here” was the last movie in competition to premiere Cannes, and when it did it sent shockwaves through the festival. Heralded by many critics as a masterpiece, the dark crime thriller marks the return of Lynne Ramsay, who hasn’t been in theaters since “We Need to Talk About Kevin” in 2011. The hiatus may have been painful for fans, but Ramsay is back in full force, with “You Were Never Really Here” winning Best Screenplay and Best Actor at Cannes.

Read More:‘You Were Never Really Here’ Review: Joaquin Phoenix Has a Death Wish In Lynne Ramsay’s Meandering Detective Story

Joaquin Phoenix plays a tormented law enforcer who saves a young girl from child trafficking. The brief Cannes synopsis reads: “A missing teenage girl. A brutal and tormented enforcer on a rescue mission. Corrupt power and vengeance unleash a storm of violence that may lead to his awakening.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Get Shorty’ Review: This Smart Take on Elmore Leonard Will Make You Forget All About Chili Palmer

‘Get Shorty’ Review: This Smart Take on Elmore Leonard Will Make You Forget All About Chili Palmer
Elmore Leonard doesn’t make adaptations easy. The many successful films and one great TV show produced from the renowned author’s work seem to indicate otherwise, but for every “Out of Sight” and “Justified,” there’s a “Killshot” and “Karen Sisco.”

Now, after a hailed novel and two feature films, “Get Shorty” becomes the latest Leonard crime story to get the series treatment, and it’s a lot closer in quality to its titular inspiration than its lesser sequel, “Be Cool.” But aside from being pretty darn good, this take goes its own way.

Anyone familiar with the 1990 book or 1995 film will certainly recognize the plot, but creator Davey Holmes’ new show isn’t doing an impression; not on any level. From the casting to the construction, this version of “Get Shorty” is its own beast. The hour-long drama may not be the next big breakout in the golden age of TV,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Swedish Dicks’ Review: Keanu Reeves is a Rare Highlight in a Detective Series Too Goofy for its Own Good

‘Swedish Dicks’ Review: Keanu Reeves is a Rare Highlight in a Detective Series Too Goofy for its Own Good
A funny, fresh detective comedy is tough to do in any language. Many shows have tried to infuse the sordid world of cheap private investigators with some offbeat humor, but “Swedish Dicks,” the latest attempt, co-created and starring Peter Stormare, bases its story in L.A. with an international and bilingual twist.

Stormare plays Ingmar, a broke ex-Hollywood stuntman who opens up an unusually affordable detective agency. Working out of a nondescript downtown L.A. office, one particular job brings fellow Swedish ex-pat Axel (Johan Glans) into his professional orbit. After the two narrowly escape the clutches of a particularly twisty gig, they go into business together. Operating under an agency with the same name as the show’s title, these two Swedes handle their client’s unconventional requests wherever in the city they might lead.

Read More:The 25 Best TV Comedy Ensembles of the Last 25 Years, Ranked

It’s not
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Difficult People’ Review: Season 3 Is The Deepest Yet, Taking On Woody Allen, Politics, and Happiness

  • Indiewire
‘Difficult People’ Review: Season 3 Is The Deepest Yet, Taking On Woody Allen, Politics, and Happiness
Difficult People” isn’t for everyone, but that’s a big factor in its charm. The always whipsmart, fast-paced comedy created by Julie Klausner is extremely insular in its focus on Julie (Klausner) and Billy (Billy Eichner), pop culture-obsessed New York comedians whose bad attitudes are often the cause of their problems. But that focus means that as the show has progressed, the characters have had the chance to… well, maybe not “grow,” in the traditional sitcom sense. However, they do seem capable of change.

Which is good news, as Season 3 of a series like this could easily fall into a more-of-the-same trap. The core principles of “Difficult People” haven’t been altered — Julie and Billy are still best friends, and still relatively disdainful of anyone outside their friendship. But, based on the five episodes screened, “Difficult People” isn’t interested in treading water this season, contributing to a richer,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Rick and Morty’ Review: ‘Pickle Rick’ Turns the Simplest Premise Into a Spectacular Action Animation Showcase

‘Rick and Morty’ Review: ‘Pickle Rick’ Turns the Simplest Premise Into a Spectacular Action Animation Showcase
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Rick and Morty” Season 3, Episode 3, “Pickle Rick.”]

When describing Rick, Bird Person put it best: “The path your father and I walked together is soaked deeply in the blood of both friend and enemy.” As goofy as “Rick and Morty” treats the adventures of this scientist at the center of these interdimensional adventures, it’s just as good about enriching his genius bona fides in different ways. It took branching out on his own, but Sunday’s episode, “Pickle Rick,” was one of the series’ best examples of untethering Rick Sanchez from all laws of nature and physics and marveling at the results.

When an elaborate turning-into-a-vegetable scheme keeps Rick from attending a family therapy session, Beth, Summer, and Morty leave the oldest member of the family in briny form, sitting on his prized workbench. From its first appearance in the Season 3 trailer, Pickle Rick has been the kind of elemental idea that “Rick and Morty” executes so well,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 13 Proves the Magic of Pie, Coffee, and an Arm-Wrestling Death Match

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return,” Season 3, “Part 13” (Episode 13).]

No part of “Twin Peaks” is predictable, but the predominant theme of “Part 13” unveiled itself in a hurry: pie.

The delicious diner desert and its perfect beverage partner have been staples of David Lynch’s series since its inception, but rarely in “The Return” have we seen such intense focus on the healing power of a good slice and a few sips.

Cooper’s (Kyle MacLachlan) fixation on cherry pie, which already saved his life once, did so again (and from the same shop). A distraught Becky (Amanda Seyfried) calls her mother, Shelly (Madchen Amick), and the mere promise of pie turns her frown upside down. Later, Norma (Peggy Lipton) meets with Walter (Grant Goodeve) about her diner franchise’s performance, and she’s told the other pies aren’t as good as her own. Norma explains why — hers are made from all-natural ingredients — to which Walter responds, “Love doesn’t always turn a profit.
See full article at Indiewire »

Ascot Elite, Jumping Horse team on family series 'Elena'

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Swiss and German producers to adapt novels from Nele Neuhaus.

Swiss and German distribution and production outfit Ascot Elite is joining forces with German outfit Jumping Horse Film to produce a series of film adaptations of author Nele Neuhaus’ family book series Elena – A Life For Horses.

German author Neuhaus’ series of six novels are aimed primarily at young girls. The books chart the adventures, travails and coming-of-age of a 13-year-old girl who grows up on an idyllic stud farm.

Writer Neuhaus is best known in Germany for her crime-thriller novels, a number of which have been adapted by Zdf for TV, and the Elena series also weave in elements of detective fiction.

Filming on volume one of the series is planned to take place in Germany in the summer of 2018.

The production team will include Ralph Dietrich, Karin Dietrich, Stephan Giger, Roger Kaufmann, Ulrich Stiehm and Frank Kaminski. The same team
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Barry Jenkins’ ‘Moonlight’: See the Seven Foreign Films That Inspired the Oscar Winner

Barry Jenkins’ ‘Moonlight’: See the Seven Foreign Films That Inspired the Oscar Winner
Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. The exclusive streaming home for The Criterion Collection, FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here.

There are so many remarkable things about the success of Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight,” a Best Picture winner that was a low-budget indie, featured gay protagonists, and was directed by an African American. Yet for all of its boundary breaking, the most radical thing about “Moonlight” often goes unnoticed: Jenkins is the first major, American Academy Award-winning director whose film lineage is distinctly non-American.

Auteurs like Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola – and the generation of filmmakers who walked in their footsteps – were heavily influenced by European art cinema, but defined their careers by striking a balance between Hollywood traditions and arthouse freedoms.
See full article at Indiewire »

TCM goes to war on Memorial Day: But thorny issues mostly avoided

Submarine movie evening: Underwater war waged in TCM's Memorial Day films In the U.S., Turner Classic Movies has gone all red, white, and blue this 2017 Memorial Day weekend, presenting a few dozen Hollywood movies set during some of the numerous wars in which the U.S. has been involved around the globe during the last century or so. On Memorial Day proper, TCM is offering a submarine movie evening. More on that further below. But first it's good to remember that although war has, to put it mildly, serious consequences for all involved, it can be particularly brutal on civilians – whether male or female; young or old; saintly or devilish; no matter the nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other label used in order to, figuratively or literally, split apart human beings. Just this past Sunday, the Pentagon chief announced that civilian deaths should be anticipated as “a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Cannes: Directors’ Fortnight Awards Go to ‘The Rider,’ ‘Let the Sunshine In’ and More

Cannes: Directors’ Fortnight Awards Go to ‘The Rider,’ ‘Let the Sunshine In’ and More
Though Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight section is technically a non-competitive one, each year, various partners and sponsors of the slate give out awards to a number of films that screen in the well-regarded section. If you’re looking to catch up on the next big thing to come out of the festival, these awards offer a smart look at exactly that (with a few well-known names, too, just for good measure).

This year’s winners include a number of very buzzy titles, including Chloé Zhao’s “The Rider” (which was recently picked up by Sony Pictures Classics), Claire DenisJuliette Binoche-starring “Let the Sunshine In” (picked up at the festival by Sundance Selects), along with Philippe Garrel’s “Lover For a Day” and Jonas Carpignano’s “A Ciambra” (which was also bought by Sundance Selects at the fest).

Read More: Cannes 2017 Deals: The Complete List of Festival Purchases

Check out
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Cannes Award Winners Announced in Cinéfondation Selection of Student Films

Cannes Award Winners Announced in Cinéfondation Selection of Student Films
Read More: Cannes Critics Week Awards: ‘Makala,’ ‘Gabriel and the Mountain’ Take Top Honors

The Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury headed by Cristian Mungiu and including Clotilde Hesme, Athina Rachel Tsangari, Barry Jenkins and Eric Khoo has awarded the 2017 Cinéfondation Prizes during a ceremony held in the Buñuel Theatre, followed by the screening of the winning films. The winners are:

First Prize

“Paul Est Là” (“Paul Is Here”)

Directed by Valentina Maurel

The Institut National Supérieur des Arts du Spectacle (Insas), Belgium

Second Prize

“Heyvan” (“Animal”)

Directed by Bahram Ark and Bahman Ark

Iranian National School of Cinema, Iran

Third Prize

Deux Égarés Sont Morts” (“Two Youths Died”)

Directed by Tommaso Usberti

La Fémis, France

The Cinéfondation allocates a €15,000 grant for the first prize, €11,250 for the second and €7,500 for the third. The winner of the first prize is also guaranteed the presentation of his or her first feature film at the Cannes Film Festival.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes: A24 Picks Up Sean Baker’s Directors’ Fortnight Hit ‘The Florida Project’

Cannes: A24 Picks Up Sean Baker’s Directors’ Fortnight Hit ‘The Florida Project’
A24 has picked up U.S. distribution rights to Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project,” Variety reports. The “Tangerine” filmmaker’s followup to his lauded breakout project premiered in the Cannes Film Festival’s Directors’ Fortnight section last week.

The outlet reports that “it was one of the few projects that resulted in interest from multiple bidders. Amazon Studios, Neon and Annapurna are circled the project this week, but dropped out after bidding on the micro-indie passed $1 million.”

Read More: Willem Dafoe Goes to Disney World: Sean Baker Reveals Details and Photos of ‘The Florida Project’ — Exclusive

When we spoke to Baker last year for an exclusive first look at the project, the filmmaker clarified the meaning of the film’s title, as our Chris O’Falt explained, “The film is not, as many believed, Sean Baker’s ‘Untitled Florida Project.’ The official title is ‘The Florida Project,’ and it
See full article at Indiewire »

IndieWire’s Movie Podcast: Screen Talk (Episode 150) – Live From Cannes, We Break Down the Festival Highlights

The Cannes Film Festival generates a lot of conversations even before it begins. In last week’s episode of Screen Talk, Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson anticipated some of the big movies and trends they expected to emerge from the 2017 festival. But for the 150th episode, recorded in front of an audience at the American Pavilion, they had lot more to discuss — including how this year’s lineup impacted Netflix’s reputation, the quality of the competition, and the early stirrings of the Oscar race.

They also addressed a number of audience questions about the state of the industry and some of the films in the program. Sony Pictures Classics co-president introduced the recording with a passionate call for the value of supporting film criticism.

Listen to the full episode above.

See MoreThe 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Screen Talk is available on iTunes.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘L’amant Double’ Review: François Ozon’s Ludicrous Erotic Thriller Is the Kinkiest Movie At Cannes

‘L’amant Double’ Review: François Ozon’s Ludicrous Erotic Thriller Is the Kinkiest Movie At Cannes
“What the hell am I looking at?” That’s the question most viewers will likely ask themselves during the opening moments of François Ozon’s (“Swimming Pool”) latest film. Following the opening credits sequence, in which a severe young woman’s face is revealed as her bangs are snipped away from over her face, Ozon cuts to an extreme close-up of something pink and fleshy and soft as gauze. Is it the soft tissue of a human brain? The camera begins to zoom out. The inside lining of an open mouth? The camera zooms out even further, until… the young woman’s clitoris comes into focus at the top of the frame, as do the gynecological devices that are prying her vagina open.

It’s a hilariously explicit way of starting a movie, even before Ozon punctuates the moment with a match-cut to the girl’s eyeball, cementing the relationship
See full article at Indiewire »
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