6.1/10
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33 user 12 critic

David and Bathsheba (1951)

Approved | | Drama, History, Romance | 10 August 1951 (USA)
Trailer
2:41 | Trailer
After King David sees the beautiful Bathsheba bathing from the palace roof, he enters into an adulterous affair which has tragic consequences for his family and Israel.

Director:

Henry King

Writer:

Philip Dunne (written for the screen by)
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Nominated for 5 Oscars. Another 1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Gregory Peck ... King David
Susan Hayward ... Bathsheba
Raymond Massey ... Nathan
Kieron Moore ... Uriah
James Robertson Justice ... Abishai
Jayne Meadows ... Michal
John Sutton ... Ira
Dennis Hoey ... Joab
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Storyline

Though David has all the wealth, power, wives & children inherent for the King of Israel he does not have what he craves most: the true love of a woman who loves him as a man instead of as King. He is attracted to Bathsheba, the wife of one of his soldiers who is more devoted to army duty than to his wife. David & Bathsheba succumb to their feelings. Their affair, her resulting pregnancy, & David's resolve to have her husband killed so Bathsheba will be free to marry, bring the wrath of God upon the kingdom. David must rediscover his faith in God in order to save Bathsheba from death by stoning, his kingdom from drought & famine, & himself from his many sins. Written by E.W. DesMarais <jlongst@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Mighty as Goliath! See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

President Lyndon B. Johnson's famous campaign ad, depicting a little girl plucking daisy petals whose count segues into a man's voice counting down to the detonation of an atomic bomb - implying that electing Barry Goldwater president would lead to nuclear Armageddon - aired for the first and only time during the September 7, 1964 telecast of this film on NBC. See more »

Goofs

Peck wears the "Star of David" throughout the movie, which doesn't appear until the 3rd century CE and was not commonly used until the middle ages. See more »

Quotes

Bathsheba: Perhaps you would prefer truth to honesty, Sire.
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Connections

Version of David (1997) See more »

User Reviews

 
Quite an interesting film actually
15 February 2011 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

I am quite surprised at the quite low rating for David and Bathsheba. True, it does get rather ponderous in its pace and some scenes go on for too long, but for me actually it is quite an interesting film. The film does look great, the photography is colourful and just lovely, while the sets and costumes are surprisingly evocative. As is Alfred Newman's score, which is also very beautiful and stirring.

I also thought Henry King did a credible job directing the film, and the script is quite literate and thoughtful. The story is interesting on the whole, some scenes as I've said do drag and don't serve as much purpose to the story as much as it would have liked, but the famous fight with Goliath flashback is cleverly staged and the last fifteen minutes moved me. The acting is fine, Gregory Peck oozes with nobility here and I am still trying to get over how handsome he looks. Susan Hayward is both ravishing and sensitive, while Raymond Massey is excellent as the prophet Nathan.

All in all, not a perfect film, but interesting. 8/10 Bethany Cox


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 August 1951 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

David and Bathsheba See more »

Filming Locations:

Sonoita, Arizona, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,170,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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