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Alice in Wonderland (1951)

Trailer
0:46 | Trailer
Alice stumbles into the world of Wonderland. Will she get home? Not if the Queen of Hearts has her way.

Writers:

Lewis Carroll (adaptation) (as Lewis Carrol), Winston Hibler (story) | 12 more credits »
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Popularity
3,778 ( 153)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Kathryn Beaumont ... Alice (voice)
Ed Wynn ... Mad Hatter (voice)
Richard Haydn ... Caterpillar (voice)
Sterling Holloway ... Cheshire Cat (voice)
Jerry Colonna ... March Hare (voice)
Verna Felton ... Queen of Hearts (voice)
J. Pat O'Malley ... Walrus / Carpenter / Dee / Dum (voice) (as Pat O'Malley)
Bill Thompson ... White Rabbit / Dodo (voice)
Heather Angel ... Alice's Sister (voice)
Joseph Kearns ... Doorknob (voice)
Larry Grey Larry Grey ... Bill (voice)
Queenie Leonard ... Bird in the Tree (voice)
Dink Trout Dink Trout ... King of Hearts (voice)
Doris Lloyd ... The Rose (voice)
James MacDonald James MacDonald ... Dormouse (voice)
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Storyline

Alice is a daydreaming young girl. She finds learning poems and listening to literature boring. She prefers stories with pictures and to live inside her imagination. One day, while enduring just such a poetry reading, she spots a large white rabbit...dressed in a jacket and carrying a large watch. He scurries off, saying he's late, for a very important date. She follows him through the forest. He then disappears down a rabbit hole. Alice follows, leading her to all manner of discoveries, characters and adventures. Written by grantss

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

'Tis Brillig...'Tis Brilliant...'Tis Out of This World! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film omits the character Mouse from the original novel. He is most notable in the novel for telling the story of the Fury, famous for the phrase: "I'll be judge, I'll be jury," Said cunning old Fury: "I'll try the whole cause, and condemn you to death."' See more »

Goofs

During the tea party, the "half a cup" changes its configuration, and the seating arrangement changes when the March Hare is smacked with a hammer. Although probably not intentional, these goofs fit in with the absurd, disorienting humor of the scene. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Alice's sister: [reading from a history book] "... leaders, and had been of late much accustomed to usurpation and conquest. Edwin and Morcar, the Earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand..." Alice.
[camera zooms out to show Alice sitting in a tree, playing with Dinah and making a crown of daisies]
Alice: Hmm? Oh, I'm listening.
Alice's sister: "And even Stigand, the archbishop of Canterbury, agreed to meet with William and offer him the crown. William's conduct at first was moderate."
[...]
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Alternate Versions

On the JeemTV showing, in the Middle East, many shots were censored from the film including the use of tobacco, such as the Dodo's pipe, the Walrus' cigar, and the Caterpillar's hookah. These shots were edited to remove the tobacco product in question by cropping, slowing down the video, or by removing the scene completely. Other shots removed included the male dandelion mating with the female flower, the shot of the horsefly being swatted away by the Rose, and the dog worm barking at the cat worm during the "All in the Golden Afternoon" sequence. See more »

Connections

Edited into Goliath II (1960) See more »

Soundtracks

A Very Merry Unbirthday (Reprise)
(1951) (uncredited)
Performed by Ed Wynn and Jerry Colonna with Verna Felton and Chorus
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User Reviews

 
A wonderful Disney adaptation of Lewis Carroll's classic novels.
20 January 2003 | by Anonymous_MaxineSee all my reviews

I was a little worried when I went to watch the film version of Alice In Wonderland, because I just read the novel and Disney has a tendency to dumb down the material that they make into their films with goofball romantic nonsense and cutesy talking animals. While I did get more than the traditional share of talking animals with this film (as well as a variety of other inanimate objects), the film stayed more faithful to the original story than is generally expected from a Disney film. On the other hand, this WAS made in 1951, which makes me wonder what a more modern adaptation would look like.

I read Alice In Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass for English 180 (Children's Literature) at the University of California, Davis, so needless to say, I read it with more of a literary appreciation than is generally applied to children's books. I was pleased to see so many of the characters from the second novel in this version of Alice In Wonderland (such as the Cheshire Cat, the talking flowers in the garden, and Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum), although I must admit that I was slightly disappointed to see that Through The Looking Glass has been assimilated into this version of Alice In Wonderland rather than adapted into its own film, which I think is an honor that it certainly deserves.

As far as being a full length feature (although rather short at roughly 75 minutes), however, I think that this movie does justice to both stories, converting them into a single story rather smoothly, and only leaving out things that will only really be missed by people who know the novels enough to be disappointed that certain things were not included. I, for example, would have loved to see the whole chess story in Through The Looking Glass included in the film (there certainly was time for it), where Alice travels through Wonderland on her quest to become a Queen herself, but I am more than happy with how this film turned out.

One of the only things that I noticed about this film that did not match up to the quality of the novels is that the books have so much more in them for adults than the movie does. There are so many tricks with language pulled in the books, such as in the conversations with Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum as well as several other characters, that it really makes you think about the English language as a game with which an endless variety of tricks can be played. In the film, this is hugely downplayed, even if only because it is done visually and the language tricks pass by so fast that kids are almost certain to miss them and even the most attentive of adults will have a hard time keeping up with them.

As a whole, however, Alice In Wonderland is so wildly entertaining that the loss of some of the literary substance does not detract from it as a terrific tale of adventure and discovery, certain to be enjoyed by people of all ages. I have heard plenty of rumors that Lewis Carroll was on any of a variety of drugs while he wrote the novels (and plenty of rumors that he wasn't on any drugs at all), but there are certainly some things in the books and in the movie that could have only been conjured up by the most, um, eccentric of imaginations. We may never know for sure, but at least we have some wonderful entertainment.

Read the books to your kids.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 September 1951 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Alicia en el país de las maravillas See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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