6.2/10
803
22 user 8 critic

To Please a Lady (1950)

Passed | | Action, Romance, Sport | 13 October 1950 (USA)
A former war hero and midget car racer meets his match in a feisty reporter who blames his reckless tactics for an accidental racing death.

Director:

Clarence Brown

Writers:

Barré Lyndon (story), Marge Decker (story) | 2 more credits »
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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Clark Gable ... Mike Brannan
Barbara Stanwyck ... Regina Forbes
Adolphe Menjou ... Gregg
Will Geer ... Jack Mackay
Roland Winters ... Dwight Barrington
William C. McGaw William C. McGaw ... Joie Chitwood
Lela Bliss ... Regina's Secretary
Emory Parnell ... Mr. Wendall
Frank Jenks ... Press Agent
Helen Spring Helen Spring ... Janie
Bill Hickman ... Mike's Pit Crew
J. Lewis Smith J. Lewis Smith ... Mike's Pit Crew (as Lew Smith)
Ted Husing Ted Husing ... Ted Husing
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Storyline

Mike Brannon is a former war hero turned midget car racer. His ruthless racing tactics have made him successful but the fans consider him a villain and boo him mercilessly. Independent, beautiful reporter Regina Forbes tries to interview him but is put off by his gruff chauvinism, and when Brannon's daredevil tactics cause the death of a fellow driver, he finds himself a pariah in the sport thanks to her articles. When she finds him earning money as a barnstorming daredevil driver hoping for a comeback, they begin to become mutually attracted. Written by duke1029@aol.com

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

THE ROARING ROMANCE OF A RACING ROUGHNECK! (original print ad - all caps) See more »

Genres:

Action | Romance | Sport

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A young Bill Hickman can be seen as one of the members of Clark Gable's pit crew. Hickman was famous as one of the top movie stunt drivers in Hollywood for many years, and his most notable on-camera role was as the middle-aged, bespectacled driver of the black Dodge Charger that is chased by Steve McQueen's green Ford Mustang in the film Bullitt (1968). See more »

Goofs

Because footage shot during the actual 1950 Indy 500 was used, Mauri Rose can be seen exiting the pits driving past the pit for the real car #17, Joie Chitwood (Mauri Rose and Joie Chitwood's pits were next to each other during the 1950 500 race). See more »

Quotes

Regina Forbes: [after a spontaneous kiss] What was that for?
Mike Brannan: I just wanted to do it.
Regina Forbes: You're some kind of guy!
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Connections

Edited into Hollywood: The Dream Factory (1972) See more »

Soundtracks

Polly-Wolly Doodle
(uncredited)
Credited usually to Daniel Decatur Emmett (as Dan Emmett)
Whistled by several characters
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User Reviews

 
Forget the defects and go for the stars!
9 May 2008 | by hondo551See all my reviews

I've gotta be honest. I never cared for racing films till I saw Cornel Wilde's "Devil's Hairpin" at a Saturday matinée a long time ago. It seemed like the start of 'modern' racing to me, where cars looked like cars and not bathtubs on wheels, and guys like Newman and Garner and McQueen were behind the wheel. Stuff made before that seemed too old and dated and creaky. So it was with some trepidation that I stayed up to watch this Gable/Stanwyck vehicle race around my TV screen for the first time. God knows it had to be creaky. They were making it while I was being conceived, and showing it in theaters while I was learning about baby formula! Yeah, there's a similar theme of drivers killing drivers like in "Devil's Hairpin", but there's Stanwyck going from being too hard-nose to sappy in love just a little too fast, Gable knocks her over way too quickly with no reason shown why he's even attracted to her, and the stars of the film look like they should have made this movie ten years earlier. But then, these stars were at the top of their game. When Stanwyck's assistant swoons over Clark Gable, she should. He's still the king! There were still plenty of women in the audience who would. And let's face it, Gable just had to dig Stanwyck because she was the best tough cookie with a soft center to come out of Hollywood ever. Gable slapping her, and some lines of dialogue stand out, especially Stanwyck saying, "You're nobody till somebody loves you," which had to predate Dean Martin's first recording of that by five years! There are lots of scenes of auto racing history for fans who appreciate that sort of thing to enjoy, but there's also the stars themselves to enjoy. Unlike today, there was a time when faces and personalities meant more to a film than the story itself, and it's watching these two stars go through the motions that really make this film worth watching even after all these years have passed.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 October 1950 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Red Hot Wheels See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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