A former war hero and midget car racer meets his match in a feisty reporter who blames his reckless tactics for an accidental racing death.

Director:

Clarence Brown

Writers:

Barré Lyndon (story), Marge Decker (story) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Clark Gable ... Mike Brannan
Barbara Stanwyck ... Regina Forbes
Adolphe Menjou ... Gregg
Will Geer ... Jack Mackay
Roland Winters ... Dwight Barrington
William C. McGaw William C. McGaw ... Joie Chitwood
Lela Bliss ... Regina's Secretary
Emory Parnell ... Mr. Wendall
Frank Jenks ... Press Agent
Helen Spring Helen Spring ... Janie
Bill Hickman ... Mike's Pit Crew
J. Lewis Smith J. Lewis Smith ... Mike's Pit Crew (as Lew Smith)
Ted Husing Ted Husing ... Ted Husing
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Storyline

Mike Brannon is a former war hero turned midget car racer. His ruthless racing tactics have made him successful but the fans consider him a villain and boo him mercilessly. Independent, beautiful reporter Regina Forbes tries to interview him but is put off by his gruff chauvinism, and when Brannon's daredevil tactics cause the death of a fellow driver, he finds himself a pariah in the sport thanks to her articles. When she finds him earning money as a barnstorming daredevil driver hoping for a comeback, they begin to become mutually attracted. Written by duke1029@aol.com

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Hot News! This girl said "NO" to GABLE! (but not for long!) See more »

Genres:

Action | Romance | Sport

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

At 20:26 in the film, a close-up shows the Sports Final section of the Bainsville daily paper. Under Barbara Stanwyck's photograph (as Regina Forbes) three pictures of "sports stars" are shown: Kathryn Grayson, Walter Pidgeon and Gene Kelly. This must have been an inside-joke as the film and the stars shown were all under contract with MGM. See more »

Goofs

When Mike Brannan stops while walking the Green Grove racetrack, he blots out half the grandstand behind him. In the next scene, he takes two steps to Regina at the railing, and the grandstand is over his left and right shoulders. See more »

Quotes

Mike Brannan: How many times have I seen you?
Regina Forbes: Oh, three or four. I don't know.
Mike Brannan: You look better each time.
Regina Forbes: You do too.
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Connections

Featured in Gremlins (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Polly-Wolly Doodle
(uncredited)
Credited usually to Daniel Decatur Emmett (as Dan Emmett)
Whistled by several characters
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User Reviews

 
Great racing scenes (Indy style) but they get in the way of plot development
26 January 2013 | by secondtakeSee all my reviews

To Please a Lady (1950)

Amazingly, this is from post-war America. It feels like a movie from the 1930s, both technically and the way the story is told. Even the stars, though both obviously alive and still working, are better known for their earlier work.

I'm speaking of Clark Gable and Barbara Stanwyck. And they have a certain degree of good chemistry on screen, though the story is so "constructed" (I'm avoiding the better word "contrived") you don't always feel what they are feeling, as characters. The one scene that does this best is an extended dinner at a club where a string orchestra is playing and they fall in love and then seem to fall out of love quickly. It's really beautiful and romantic (and the strings are as lush as any string section has sounded, and I mean it).

Because of all these things this ends up being both a great fun movie and a bit of a throwback that doesn't quite take off. The director, Clarence Brown, is also known best for much earlier movies (like the award winning pre-code "A Free Soul" which is fabulous). He's good, the acting is good, and the story is, well, pretty good. It's serviceable, but a little too packaged and somewhat thin going.

Another factor here is the racing itself, the Indianapolis 500. Some of the footage is clearly from real races (probably the 1949 or 1950 race...this movie was released in the fall of 1950). There are lots of scenes--too many, unless you are car racing fan--of cars zooming around the track. Credit goes to the cinematographer, Harold Rosson, who is a bit legendary because he helped with "Wizard of Oz" and did several other classics like "Asphalt Jungle" and "The Bad Seed." The photography matters more than usual here because it's "just" car racing, and it's made exciting and visually intense. Closeups of Gable in the car are of course constructed in the studio, but seemalessly. Great visuals throughout.

See this? You bet, but remember it's really an entertainment, and it has little complexity or depth, and it has lots and lots of race track stuff that doesn't propel the plot, just the immediate energy. It's no classic, but it has classic qualities and faces, for sure, and I liked it. And in the end, without giving a thing away, the woman (Stanwyck) stays strong and keeps her independence, a rare thing in 1950s movies.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 October 1950 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Red Hot Wheels See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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