The Young and the Damned (1950) - News Poster

News

Hypnotic Chill! Monster Thrill!

This short article is in the spirit of the crowded ad-mat advertising blurbs that, once upon a time, would show up in the newspaper for horror related features. The particular composite above is a fantasy, but since all films back then were for General Audiences, a stack like it is entirely credible. Here, it’s an excuse for a trio of personal Savant anecdotes, vividly remembered from fifty-odd years ago.

Not Bad! Charlie Largent assembled this convincing triple bill ad paste-up,

customized for San Bernardino in 1964.

Don’t listen to Gen X’ers or Millennials, kids: the Real era to be an adolescent moviegoer was in the 1950s and 1960s, when downtown movie palaces had regular Saturday kiddie matinees, just as seen in the nostalgic Joe Dante movie. Theaters in most towns functioned as ad hoc babysitters, with kids dropped off in clumps. In many cases the oldest squab in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Captain from Castile

One of the best Hollywood historical epics takes Technicolor to Mexico for a Production Code version of La conquista: the Inquisition is still bad, but the Church is exonerated. Likewise with the invasion — Cesar Romero embodies a marvelous Hernán Cortés, substantially less murderous than the one we now know from accurate history books. Tyrone Power is the heartthrob hero and newcomer Jean Peters the lowborn girl who loves him. The magnificent scenery is matched by the music score of Alfred Newman.

Captain from Castile

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1947 / Color / 137 Academy / 141 min. / Street Date October 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Tyrone Power, Jean Peters, Cesar Romero, Lee J. Cobb, John Sutton, Antonio Moreno, Thomas Gomez, Alan Mowbray, Barbara Lawrence, George Zucco, Roy Roberts, Marc Lawrence, Reed Hadley, Robert Karnes, Estela Inda, Chris-Pin Martin, Jay Silverheels, Gilberto González.

Cinematography: Arthur Arling, Charles G. Clarke, Joseph Lashelle

Film Editor: Barbara McLean
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

La fièvre monte à El Pao

Luis Buñuel's most direct film about revolutionary politics brandishes few if any surreal touches in its clash between French star Gérard Philipe and the Mexican legend María Félix. Borrowing the climax of the opera Tosca, it's an intelligent study of how not to effect change in a corrupt political regime. La fièvre monte à El Pao Region A+B Blu-ray + Pal DVD Pathé (Fr) 1959 / B&W / 1:37 flat (should be 1:66 widescreen) / 96 min. / Los Ambiciosos; "Fever Mounts at El Pao" / Street Date December 4, 2013 / available at Amazon France / Eur 26,27 Starring Gérard Philipe, María Félix, Jean Servais, M.A. Soler, Raúl Dantés, Domingo Soler, Víctor Junco, Roberto Cañedo, Enrique Lucero, Pilar Pellicer, David Reynoso, Andrés Soler. Cinematography Gabriel Figueroa Assistant Director Juan Luis Buñuel Original Music Paul Misraki Written by Luis Buñuel, Luis Alcoriza, Charles Dorat, Louis Sapin from a novel by Henri Castillou Produced by Jacques Bar, Óscar Dancigers, Gregorio Walerstein
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Wrinkles’ Producer, Glow Studio Board Buñuel Toon Pic

Madrid — Almost 33 years after his death, Spanish film legend Luis Buñuel is back again, this time as the leading character of an animated feature project, “Buñuel en el laberinto de las tortugas” (Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles), based on his filming the celebrated – and at its time controversial – 1932 documentary “Land Without Bread,” now reckoned one of his greatest films.

Shot in the Extremaduran mountains of Las Hurdes, “Land Without Bread” was a film which satisfied Buñuel’s left-wing convictions while he also found the ethos in one of the poorest parts of Europe, of surrealism, a credo which informed his whole career.

The toon film project, which also aims to portray Buñuel’s evolution as an artist, is produced by Manuel Cristobal at Sygnatia in partnership with Jose Fernandez de Vega’s animation studio Glow, and has been pre-bought by Spanish pubcaster Rtve.

Helmed by Salvador Simo and written by Eligio Montero (“Desaparecida,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Daily | Varda, Maddin, Selznick

In today's roundup: David Bordwell on Agnès Varda, Guy Maddin on walking and making collages, the unlikely connection between Orson Welles and the New Queer Cinema of the early 90s, the Chiseler on Mae Busch and Larry Tucker, Patti Smith on Bob Dylan and Karina Longworth on David O. Selznick, Jennifer Jones and Robert Walker. Plus: Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s Mustang wins this year's Lux Prize, two new projects for Lee Daniels, Werner Herzog's Rogue Film School is heading to Munich and Richard Linklater will be discussing Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados in Austin tonight. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Varda, Maddin, Selznick

In today's roundup: David Bordwell on Agnès Varda, Guy Maddin on walking and making collages, the unlikely connection between Orson Welles and the New Queer Cinema of the early 90s, the Chiseler on Mae Busch and Larry Tucker, Patti Smith on Bob Dylan and Karina Longworth on David O. Selznick, Jennifer Jones and Robert Walker. Plus: Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s Mustang wins this year's Lux Prize, two new projects for Lee Daniels, Werner Herzog's Rogue Film School is heading to Munich and Richard Linklater will be discussing Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados in Austin tonight. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Herzog, Linklater, Haynes

In today's roundup: Interviews with Werner Herzog, Gaspar Noé, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Gina Telaroli and Kurt Walker. Richard Linklater on Jean-Luc Godard's Masculin-Féminin, Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados, Robert Bresson's Pickpocket, Ulrike Ottinger's Ticket of No Return, Martin Scorsese's New York, New York and Nagisa Oshima's The Ceremony. Vanity Fair's Bill Murray profile. Remembering actor and scriptwriter Colin Welland (Chariots of Fire). Simon Callow on Orson Welles. News of forthcoming films by Shane Carruth, Xavier Dolan, Duncan Jones and Edgar Wright—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Herzog, Linklater, Haynes

In today's roundup: Interviews with Werner Herzog, Gaspar Noé, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Gina Telaroli and Kurt Walker. Richard Linklater on Jean-Luc Godard's Masculin-Féminin, Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados, Robert Bresson's Pickpocket, Ulrike Ottinger's Ticket of No Return, Martin Scorsese's New York, New York and Nagisa Oshima's The Ceremony. Vanity Fair's Bill Murray profile. Remembering actor and scriptwriter Colin Welland (Chariots of Fire). Simon Callow on Orson Welles. News of forthcoming films by Shane Carruth, Xavier Dolan, Duncan Jones and Edgar Wright—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Cinema's Hidden Pearls -- Part I

Cinema’s Hidden Pearls – Part I

By Alex Simon

One of nature’s rarest items, a pearl is produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk. Just like the shell of a clam, a pearl is composed of calcium carbonate in minute crystalline form, which has been deposited in concentric layers. Truly flawless pearls are infrequently produced in nature, and as a result, the pearl has become a metaphor for something rare, fine, admirable and valuable. Hidden pearls exist in the world of movies, as well: films that, in spite of being brilliantly crafted and executed, never got the audience they deserved beyond a cult following.

Here are a few of our favorite hidden pearls in the world of film:

1. Night Moves (1975)

Director Arthur Penn hit three home runs in a row with the trifecta of Bonnie & Clyde, Alice’s Restaurant and Little Big Man,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Film Forum Honoring Legendary Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa

While the name Gabriel Figueroa may not be a familiar one to many, even those with a stronger affinity for filmmaking and the art behind it, New York’s own Film Forum is hoping to change that.

On June 5, the theater began a career spanning retrospective surrounding the work of iconic cinematographer and Mexican film industry legend Gabriel Figueroa. Taking a look at 19 of the photographer’s films, the series is running in conjunction with the new exhibition at El Museo del Barrio, entitled Under The Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa – Art And Film.

Best known as a pioneer of Mexican cinema, primarily with his work alongside director Emilio Fernandez, Figueroa’s work was as varied as they come. His work with Fernandez is without a doubt this retrospective’s highlight, particularly films like Wildflower. One of the many times Mexican cinema’s “Big Four” worked together, the film saw the
See full article at CriterionCast »

>A Story Of Children And Film, film review:

Mark Cousins' essay on children and cinema is playful and profound. His frame of reference is vast, stretching from Tom and Jerry to Meet Me in St Louis, from British films such as Kes to Idrissa Ouedraogo's Yaaba, Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados, Andrei Tarkovsky's Mirror, Spielberg's Et and the recent Dutch classic Kauwboy. Cousins organises his clips thematically, exploring subjects such as "wariness," "destructiveness" and "class," and always looking for parallels between different cultures and periods. He also makes highly inventive use of one of his own home movies, which features his nephew and niece playing marbles and acting up for the camera. Just occasionally, there is a hint of narcissism (early on, Cousins seems to compare himself to Van Gogh) and one or two of his readings of films are reductive. (It seems perverse to see the relationship between Pip and Estella in David Lean's
See full article at The Independent »

LatinoBuzz: Shipwrecked Latino Filmmakers

We asked a few LatinoBuzz amigos to get their Robinson Crusoe on and pick a film, an album, a book and a companion from the movies to join them in their shenanigans were they to be stuck on a deserted island (and before anyone nitpicks, filmmakers are resourceful, so of course they built solar powered entertainment centers made from bamboos, coconuts and grass to watch movies and listen to baby making slow jams). We figured we'd start with the narrative filmmakers since they probably sit around thinking about this kinda stuff anyway.

Film: Choosing desert island items may mean sacrificing taste and/or reason, thinking about those items that you wouldn’t forgive yourself for not bringing them as your company, it´s like choosing the woman of your life. Here it goes: Hiroshima Mon Amour; there might be others I fancy as much as or more than (La Dolce Vita, Vertigo, M , some Lubitsch or Preminger), but I can think of no other as unique. I wouldn’t be able to choose any other without feeling Hiroshima’s absence - the best love film, the best movie about war, the best motion picture regarding the memory and its consequences. I can spend my whole life learning about film and the world because of Hiroshima...'.

Album: “Los Preludios de Debussy” by Claudio Arrau. These were so important to my life (I'm referring to my childhood of course) and I think no one does it better than Arrau. Same thing: it is endless. I think I could never tire of this and I could still wake up each and every morning amazed by it.

Book: “Sentimental Education”, by Flaubert. Similar to “Hiroshima”, a book that changed my outlook on literature and the world and I am certain it will keep transforming it forever.

Companion: Susie Diamond (Michelle Pfeiffer in 'The fabulous Baker Boys'). Since I saw the film (which I liked very much!) in the provincial movie theater of my childhood, I felt as Jack Baker´s relative and I loved Susie. If we had a piano, it would all be all be perfect. - Santiago Palavecino (Algunas chicas/Some Girls)

Film: This is a tricky question. I've always said that on a deserted island you should bring some porn. You could use that more than regular movies. But since I've got to pick a film I guess it'd be Jaws. Why? Because it's one of my favorites (I could also go with The Good, the Bad and the Ugly). But being on a deserted island, Jaws will remind me all the time what'll happen to me for sure if I try to get away!

Album: “ Appetite for Destruction” (Guns N' Roses). Hey, I was 13 when this came out. I listen to it every day while I work, anyways. My favorite, by far.

A Book: I'm going to cheat on this one: 'The Complete Works' by Jorge Luis Borges. The best writer, and enough labyrinths to get lost on endless nights.

Companion: Sherlock Holmes. He's always been my favorite, and also, since my guess is he'll be pretty useless in a deserted island, every time we fail to get out because of him I can get to tell him "Is that the best you can do, Sherlock? - Alejandro Brugués (Juan of the Dead)

Film: Los Olvidados- this is punk rock and Pachuco. Mexico City style before the bombed out bunkers of Sid & Nancy. Bunuel is a hero and I wanna buy Jaibo a beer and milk for the old poetic man!

Album: The Blade Runner album. I can play it over and over, get cranked up or mellow with Blade Runner Blues and the constant rain.

Book: '20 years of Joda' - poems of Jose Montoya, my pop. Epic stuff! 'Ran with Miguel Pinero in the Lower Eastside!”

Companion: Michael Corleone cause he's Mack in my book! Jaibo gets an honorable mention. - Richard Montoya (Water & Power )

Film: I´d choose Misery because a year can go by and I can watch it again eagerly. It's simple and the director (Rob Reiner) and Stephen King are both masters of suspense.

Album: I know this may be considered cheating but it would have to be 'The Best of David Bowie'. That way I have 2 CD's with nearly 40 songs!

Companion: There's many great people who I would to live with but on a deserted Island? It would have to be Mary Poppins for obvious reasons.

Book: And finally the book would be 'Blood Meridian' by Cormac McCarthy because it's one I haven't read yet. Analeine Cal y Mayor - (The Boy Who Smells Like Fish)

Film: I would say White Chicks. I’m going to need some humor! White Chicks is the movie that I put on when I need a good laugh. It does it for me every time. I grew up with characters like that; and admittedly, I can regress back to a few of them myself when no one is looking.

Album: ' Songs From the Capeman' - Paul Simon. I can’t get enough of that album. It instantly takes me to that world and electrifies that side of me that’s determined to make a change for Latinos. I want to keep that feeling with me alive eternally…wherever I’m at.”

Book: There are many but 'Anatomy of the Spirit' by Caroline Myss has been my compass. It taught me how to take control of my destiny by listening to my intuition and body. I stand by her quote: “Your biography becomes your biology.

Companion: The first person that came to mind when I read the question was silly Clarence from “It’s a Wonderful Life”. I guess I’m going to need an angel with me, and he’s perfect. He has a pure childlike spirit that would help me find gratitude in the most unlikely moments… even on a deserted island! That right there is the meaning of life. - Carmen Marron (Endgame)

Film: There are so many brilliant, groundbreaking favorite films that have influenced me (The 400 Blows; Jules and Jim ; Law of Desire; et al) but I wouldn't bring any of them. If I'm stuck on a deserted island, I'm bringing Neil Simon's Murder by Death so I can laugh my ass off. Not a great film at all, it's true, but it's a classic comedy.

Album: Oh, this is easy: Madonna's "Ray of Light." I am no Madonna fanatic, but "deserted island, " means beach + summer weather + Fire Island-like atmosphere. So somewhere nearby there's got to be gay guys partying and I will use Madonna to lure them to me so I can be rescued.

One Book: Varga Llosa's "Feast of the Goat" ("La Fiesta del Chivo") -- it's action-packed historical fiction. It will keep me occupied. One of my favorite novels.

Companion: Huckleberry Finn. He will be a great companion: not only will he tell great stories, but undoubtedly, the ever-resourceful Huck Finn will figure out how to build a raft and get us out off that island! - Terracino (Elliot Loves )

Film: Whenever anyone asks me this I always think of what use these items would serve practically on a deserted island, so I answered this in that respect. Tokyo Story - Yasujiro Ozu. This would be a great film to take on a deserted island because it's really about the unavoidable suffering of the cycle of life, which I'm sure you'd relate to if you were stuck on an island. I really could watch this film a million times over and notice something new every time. Watching most Ozu films is not unlike participating in a Zen meditation practice. It's patience and slowness and trying to empty your mind of thought until your left with the basics of existence. Kind of like sitting on a deserted island alone. I can watch the scene where Kyoto says “Life is disappointing, isn't it?” and Noriko smiles and says “Yes it is.” I can watch that endlessly and cry every time. It's so true.

Album: ' Tusk' - Fleetwood Mac. I could also deal with 'Rumours' but I picked 'Tusk' because it's longer and denser; probably better for an island. 'Sara' is maybe my favorite song in the world and so it would be nice to have that with me. I think channeling the powerful witchy energy of Stevie Nicks would be a real asset on an island. This album has so much strange material on - you wouldn't get bored too easily with it. It's also got a range of emotions so if you get too depressed on the island you can just put on 'Never Forget' and feel better. And 'Sisters of the Moon' would be good around a fire at night. Even though you're stuck on an island, it's good to create an ambiance to remind you that life is worth living.

Book: ' In Search of Lost Time' - Marcel Proust. I've only read 'Swann's Way' which is first part of this. My analyst recommend it to me when I was totally heartbroken after someone broke up with me. It really did the trick. This would be a good long epic read that has enough complex ideas in it to keep you occupied for a life time. Probably a good book (or set of books) to get back to nature with.

Companion: I'll say Terry Malloy from “On the Waterfront”. He'd be strong and good to have around to cut down trees and hunt and stuff. He's also easy on the eyes and someone that could do with a little lonely contemplation away from the loading docks. That doesn't sound half bad...stuck on like a tropical island with a young, cute Marlon Brando, watching Ozu, reading Proust and listening to Fleetwood Mac all day. Sign me up! - Joshua Sanchez (Four)

Film: My film would have to be Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados. I have been a movie watcher since I was a child. Raised on mainstream American films and Wuxia flicks, it wasn't until I was a late teen that I took my first film class and was introduced to the work of Buñuel. Los Olvidados literally changed my perception of the world, both socially and visually. It was also the gateway for me to progress from movie watcher to film student.

Album: Music is my religion and I belong to the church of Robert Nesta Marley. I would prefer the whole anthology, but if I had to choose one album it would be “Exodus”. When on an island listen to island music.

Book: Right around the time I discovered the work of Buñuel, I was gifted Jose Montoya's 'In Formation: 20 years of Joda'. The book is a treasure of epic poems, sketches, and corridos. All testaments to the beauty and strength of Chicana/o culture. 20 years later I pay homage to both of these Maestros in my debut feature film, “Cry Now”. The film's protagonist is nicknamed 'Ojitos' during the course of the narrative, a reference to one of the characters in Los Olvidados. The late great Lupe Ontiveros playing the role of a sage loosely recites Montoya's mantra 'La Locura Cura' (In madness you find truth) while she councils our protagonist.

Companion: To bring it all full circle my fictitious character would have to be a Wuxia hero. As a child I was awe inspired by these bigger than life martial artists. As an adult, Ang Lee's “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” did the same. I know all would be as it should if Yu Shu Lien was on that island with me. - Alberto Barboza (Cry Now )

Film: Nothing But a Man (1964) It's a film that does an incredible job balancing a character-driven story within a politically charged context. It's a film I'm finding myself inspired by as I continue to write Los Valientes.

Album: I'm not a fan of albums, but if I had to choose one I guess I would have to go with any of Prince's albums. His music always puts me in a trance.

Book: My dream journal so I can look back look for signs of what is to become of my future.

Companion: Who better than TV's MacGyver. I'd put his ass to work on getting me off the island! -Aurora Guerrero (Mosquita y Mari)

Film: Hell in the Pacific so that I can be reminded that even in paradise there is a duality.

Album: “La Scala: Concert” by Ludovico Einaudi – I've listened to it a thousand times and each time I feel or discover something new.

Book: “ Voces Reunidas” by Antonio Porchia. Each time I read one of his poems I learn something new and I'm deeply moved.

Companion: Barbarella, so I could never be lonely and I could enjoy this planet-island – Diego Quemada-Díez (La jaula de oro/The Golden Dream)

Written by Juan Caceres . LatinoBuzz is a weekly feature on SydneysBuzz that highlights Latino indie talent and upcoming trends in Latino film with the specific objective of presenting a broad range of Latino voices. Follow [At]LatinoBuzz on Twitter and Facebook
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Lacma and Academy to Present Major Exhibition on Mexican Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa (Clips)

Lacma and Academy to Present Major Exhibition on Mexican Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa (Clips)
Beginning September 22 and running through February of 2014, Lacma will host "Under the Mexican Sky," an exhibition co-presented by the Academy highlighting the prolific and award-winning Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa. His career spanned 50 years and over 200 films. Clips below. Recognized as one of the most important cinematographers of the 20th century, Figueroa collaborated with artists such as Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco, and filmmakers like Emilio Fernandez and John Ford. Nominated for an Oscar for John Huston's "The Night of the Iguana" (1964), Figueroa won awards at Cannes, a Golden Globe and won best cinematography each year at the Mexican Ariel Awards from 1947 to 1951. He worked on seven films by Luis Bunuel including "Los Olvidados" (1950) and "The Exterminating Angel" (1962). The exhibition features film clips, paintings, photographs, posters and documents drawn from Figueroa’s archive, now owned by the Televisa Foundation. In addition, the...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Tarantino, Scorsese and Other Directors Reveal Their Top 10 Movies of All Time

There was plenty of discussion across the movie blogosphere following last week's announcement that Vertigo had dethroned Citizen Kane as the greatest film of all time according to Sight & Sound's decennial poll. In addition to revealing the top 50 as determined by critics, they also provided a top 10 based on a separate poll for directors only. In the print version of the magazine, they have taken it a step further by reprinting some of the individual top 10 lists from the filmmakers who participated, and we now have some of them here for your perusal. Among them, we have lists from legends like Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and Quentin Tarantino, but there are also some unexpected newcomers who took part including Richard Ayoade (Submarine), Miranda July (Me and You and Everyone We Know) and Sean Durkin (Martha Marcy May Marlene). Some of these lists aren't all that surprising (both Quentin Tarantino
See full article at FilmJunk »

Top Ten Movies of All-Time from Scorsese, Tarantino, Coppola, Allen, Del Toro and More

Last week, the recent Sight & Sound list of the top 50 movies of all-time (find it here) was released. The poll is conducted every ten years and this year's edition was made by polling 846 critics, programmers, academics and distributors. In addition to that list, however, Sight & Sound polled 358 film directors, which included Martin Scorsese, Quentin Tarantino, Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Mike Leigh. Tallying the results the directors' top ten looked like this: Tokyo Story (dir. Yasujiro Ozu) 2001: A Space Odyssey (dir. Stanley Kubrick) Citizen Kane (dir. Orson Welles) 8 1/2 (dir. Federico Fellini) Taxi Driver (dir. Martin Scorsese) Apocalypse Now (dir. Francis Ford Coppola) The Godfather (dir. Francis Ford Coppola) Vertigo (dir. AAlfred Hitchcock) Mirror (dir. Andrei Tarkovsky) Bicycle Thieves (dir. Vittoria De Sica) The problem, for me at least, is that doesn't really tell us much. Just like the Sight & Sound list we're looking at something that simply lists
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Blu-ray Review: The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie

Film

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a landmark film, truly one of the greatest ever made and perhaps filmmaker Luis Buñuel’s finest (it’s certainly my favorite of his). It’s also so much fun. Buñuel’s anger at institutions was long and storied, and his films were frequently calls for outright anarchy, but Discreet Charm was a turn away from the bitterness and meanness of films like The Exterminating Angel or Los Olvidados towards a genial bemusement at the absurdity of upper-class life. Telling the story of a group of friends whose attempts to get together for dinner are thwarted first by simple misunderstandings, and later by more elaborate, surreal interventions, you get the sense that he’s somewhere, just offscreen, laughing at the whole endeavor, and inviting us to do likewise.

So for those of the opinion that a filmmaker must love or sympathize with his characters,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

My favourite film: Koyaanisqatsi

In the latest of our writers' favourite film series, Leo Hickman is bowled over by the elemental force of Godfrey Reggio and Philip Glass's 1982 environmental masterpiece

Want to set the world to rights? Have your say in the comments section below – or write your own review

It's a film without any characters, plot or narrative structure. And its title is notoriously hard to pronounce. What's not to love about Koyaanisqatsi?

I came to Godfrey Reggio's 1982 masterpiece very late. It was actually during a Google search a few years back when looking for timelapse footage of urban traffic (for work rather than pleasure!) that I came across a "cult film", as some online reviewers were calling it. This meant I first watched it as all its loyal fans say not to: on DVD, on a small screen. If ever a film was destined for watching in a cinema, this is it.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The film directors' favourite

Although the French screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière has collaborated with Tati, Buñuel and Schlöndorff, he is the invisible man of film

To read the newly published This Is Not the End of the Book, a conversation between Umberto Eco and Jean-Claude Carrière, is to eavesdrop on two highly erudite minds. Digressive, anecdotal and humorous, they reflect on their love of the printed word and where the destiny of the book might lie, ranging from neglected French poetry of the 16th century to a forthcoming first edition of Waiting for Godot in the revived Nahuatl language of the Aztecs. But while Eco is internationally famous for his bestselling historical novels, Carrière has a relatively low profile even in his native France. Low, that is, for someone whose career as a dramatist has encompassed collaborations with an unparalleled array of directorial talent from film and theatre, and 50 books, in addition to the 80 screenplays,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Retro Review 1981: Pixote

Pixote: a Lei do Mais Fraco (Original Release Date: 5 May 1981)

Hector Babenco's Pixote is a movie about kids trying to survive in a world that doesn't seem to want to let them.  Outside of a documentary short like Ciro Durán's Gamín, my guess is that era reviews didn't have much to compare Pixote to beyond Luis Buñuel's Los Olvidados or Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist. I'd also guess that not all of these comparisons were flattering. Babenco's direction here lacks the visual punch of Buñuel's, and his characters are nowhere near as well-formed as Dickens's. With any Buñuel comparison, one must contend a sophistication that, to this day, leads people to argue over how much of the work is earnest, and how much of it is ironic or parodic. (This excludes film students.  I'd say film students still love to debate whether Las Hurdes is a
See full article at Corona's Coming Attractions »

Susana; El Bruto – Philip French's classic DVD

(Luis Buñuel, 1951; 1952, 12, Mr Bongo)

After his two avant- garde collaborations with fellow surrealist Salvador DaliUn Chien Andalou (1929) and L'Age d'Or (1930) – Luis Buñuel disappeared below the radar in Mexico until reappearing at Cannes with Los Olvidados in 1951. He continued working there until re-establishing himself in Europe in the 1960s as one of the great directors. His mostly little-known Mexican films – rough-hewn, low-budget melodramas for the most part – are always interesting, and these two early ones complement each other as they explore characteristic themes of lust, cruelty, class, hypocrisy and corruption. In Susana, a satanic femme fatale offers up successful prayers for escape from her hellhole of a reform school and proceeds to ingratiate herself into a wealthy bourgeois family where she proceeds to destroy everyone around her. In El Bruto, a violent, ox-like abattoir worker (the great Pedro Armendáriz) is hired to do a slum landlord's dirty work and is
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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