7.1/10
513
4 user 7 critic

To Take a Wife (2004)

Ve'Lakhta Lehe Isha (original title)
The story takes place in Haifa, Israel, in 1979, during three days before the Shabbat. A young woman trying to raise three children, work from home, and observe the strict Moroccan ... See full summary »
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8 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Ronit Elkabetz ... Viviane
Simon Abkarian ... Eliahou
Gilbert Melki ... Albert
Sulika Kadosh Sulika Kadosh ... Hanina Ohayon
Dalia Beger ... Dona (as Dalia Malka Beger)
Kobi Regev Kobi Regev ... Eviatar
Omer Moshkovitz Omer Moshkovitz ... Gabrielle
Yam Eitan Yam Eitan ... Lior
Valérie Zarrouk Valérie Zarrouk ... Yvette
Carl Zrihen Carl Zrihen ... Victor (as Charly Zrihen)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Ben Barak Ben Barak
Gilles Ben-David Gilles Ben-David ... (as Gilad Ben-David)
Dina Blay Dina Blay
Rozina Cambos
Albert Cohen
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Storyline

The story takes place in Haifa, Israel, in 1979, during three days before the Shabbat. A young woman trying to raise three children, work from home, and observe the strict Moroccan traditions of her family finds herself at constant odds with her husband and her brothers, who want her to stay married and leave behind the notions of being loved and free. Written by fkelleghan@hotmail.com

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Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

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Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in A History of Israeli Cinema (2009) See more »

User Reviews

A confused yet effective film
18 March 2005 | by phewfighterSee all my reviews

Ronit Elkabetz has a tendency for extravagant characters and in this film portrays yet another. Her loveless marriage in shambles, her old lover back in Israel, she stumbles from one situation to the next as if under no power of her own. Her husband, her children, her neighbors, her lover -- they all seem more like obstacles in her path toward self-actualization than characters she feels anything for.

The narrative is awkward and confused, the characters seem to lack any particular drive, but it still all kind of pulls together because of the emotional immediacy created by explosive bursts from various characters well-captured by the camera in close-up.

While I can't say I thought it was a very good film, it's definitely interesting. If Shlomi and Ronit Elkabetz can tighten up their storytelling, their next work should be truly unique.


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Details

Country:

France | Israel

Language:

French | Hebrew | Arabic

Release Date:

March 2004 (Israel) See more »

Also Known As:

Getrennte Wege See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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