7.6/10
11,484
122 user 59 critic

Gun Crazy (1950)

Passed | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 20 January 1950 (USA)
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5:23 | Clip
A well meaning crack shot husband is pressured by his beautiful marksman wife to go on an interstate robbery spree, where he finds out just how depraved and deadly she really is.

Director:

Joseph H. Lewis

Writers:

MacKinlay Kantor (screenplay), Dalton Trumbo (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peggy Cummins ... Annie Laurie Starr
John Dall ... Bart Tare
Berry Kroeger ... Packett
Morris Carnovsky ... Judge Willoughby
Anabel Shaw ... Ruby Tare Flagler
Harry Lewis ... Deputy Clyde Boston
Nedrick Young ... Dave Allister
Trevor Bardette ... Sheriff Boston
Mickey Little Mickey Little ... Bart Tare (age 7)
Russ Tamblyn ... Bart Tare (age 14) (as Rusty Tamblyn)
Paul Frison Paul Frison ... Clyde Boston (age 14)
David Bair David Bair ... Dave Allister (child) (as Dave Bair)
Stanley Prager ... Bluey-Bluey
Virginia Farmer ... Miss Wynn
Anne O'Neal Anne O'Neal ... Miss Augustine Sifert
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Storyline

Since he was a child, Bart Tare has always loved guns. After leaving the army, his friends take him to a carnival, where he meets the perfect girl; Annie, a sharp-shooting sideshow performer who loves guns as much as he. The 2 run off and marry, but Annie isn't happy with their financial situation, so at her behest the couple begins a cross-country string of daring robberies. Never one to use guns for killing, Bart's dragged down into oblivion by the greedy and violent nature of the woman he loves. Written by Martin Lewison <lewison+@pitt.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Thrill Crazy... Kill Crazy... Gun Crazy See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bart Tare and Laurie Starr are modeled on the infamous Depression-era bandits Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker, who are also the subjects of Bonnie and Clyde (1967), You Only Live Once (1937) and The Bonnie Parker Story (1958). See more »

Goofs

After crashing through the gates where the park rangers are trying to stop them the couple spins the car out in the rough terrain. As it spins, it can be seen that there is no rear window in the car. See more »

Quotes

Bluey-Bluey: That's where the real money is made, buster. Yessir, we got the crookedest carnival layout west of the Mississippi. Why, we got more ways of making suckers than we got suckers. When we pull out of this burg tomorrow morning, the natives will have nothing but some old collar buttons and rusty bobby pins.
See more »

Connections

Version of Guncrazy (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Laughing on the Outside (Crying on the Inside)
(uncredited)
Music by Bernie Wayne
Lyrics by Ben Raleigh
Sung by Frances Irvin at the dance club
See more »

User Reviews

 
Quintessential film-noir
30 January 2006 | by pzanardoSee all my reviews

What is the quintessence of a film-noir? A good answer is: an evil strong woman that manipulates a weak, although basically decent, man, involving him in a crazy love, doomed to a tragic ending. Then we can safely state that "Deadly is the Female" is a perfect instance of film-noir.

The movie has outstanding merits. The cinematography, and especially the camera-work are excellent, and comparable to the best achievements in the film-noir genre. Justly celebrated are the scenes filmed with the camera inside the car, like that of the bank shot in Hampton, a true cinematic gem. John Dall and Peggy Cummins, in the roles of the doomed lovers Bart and Annie Laurie, make a great job. The story starts slowly (a minor drawback), but as soon as the two lovers cross the border of legality, the movie acquires a quick, exciting and ruthless pace and presents a powerful finale.

The psychology of Bart and Annie Laurie is studied with care. Annie Laurie is a systematic liar. With Bart she always looks sweet, deeply in love, even subdued to her man. To justify her shootings and murders, she always whines with Bart that she had lost her nerves, that she was scared. But when Bart is not present, the viewer gets from her body language and the cruel expression of her eyes that she just loves to kill. Great job by Peggy Cummins.

So does Laurie just make use of Bart for her dirty purposes, to satisfy her own depravity? Not at all. Oddly enough, in another famous scene we see that Laurie really loves Bart with all her heart. Only, she is bad and cruel, that's her inner core. And is Bart so stupid and bewitched not to realize that Laurie is going to ruin him? No, he knows it, and he deeply suffers, but ultimately he doesn't care. Only Laurie counts. Desperately crazy love... how fascinating! (at least in a film-noir).

The script offers several memorable lines, and the many subtleties give realism to the story. For instance, Bart and Laurie are not professional criminals, and they show it when they carelessly spend "hot" money, which will cost them dearly.

"Deadly is the Female" is an excellent film, a relevant nugget in the film-noir gold mine. Highly recommended.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 January 1950 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gun Crazy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$400,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$17,322
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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