6.9/10
1,095
34 user 24 critic

Gone to Earth (1950)

Not Rated | | Drama, Romance | 6 November 1950 (UK)
A beautiful, superstitious, animal-loving Gypsy is hotly desired by a fox-hunting squire even after she marries a clergyman.

Writers:

Mary Webb (novel), Michael Powell | 1 more credit »
Reviews
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jennifer Jones ... Hazel Woodus
David Farrar ... John 'Jack' Reddin
Cyril Cusack ... Edward Marston
Sybil Thorndike ... Mrs. Marston
Edward Chapman ... Mr. James
Esmond Knight ... Abel Woodus
Hugh Griffith ... Andrew Vessons
George Cole ... Cousin Albert
Beatrice Varley Beatrice Varley ... Aunt Prowde
Frances Clare Frances Clare ... Amelia Clomber
Raymond Rollett Raymond Rollett ... Landlord / Elder
Gerald Lawson Gerald Lawson ... Roadmender / Elder
Bartlett Mullins Bartlett Mullins ... Chapel elder, dress shop owner
Arthur Mainzer Arthur Mainzer ... Chapel elder (as Arthur Reynolds)
Ann Titheradge Ann Titheradge ... Miss James
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Storyline

Hazel Woodus is a beautiful but innocent country girl who loves all the creatures around her, especially her pet fox cub. She is given a rough time by her father but can escape to run barefoot through the woods when her harsh life gets too much for her. It is there that she is found by the local squire, Jack Reddin, finds her and is struck by her beauty. The obvious conflict develops when the squire leads the local hunt and tries to kill Hazel's pet fox. The title "Gone to Earth" is taken from the huntsmans cry when the target is no longer obtainable. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

From the makers of "The Red Shoes" and "Tales of Hoffman" See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Opening credits: The events, characters and firms depicted in this photoplay are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead or to actual firms, is purely coincidental. See more »

Goofs

As Abel and Hazel Woodus come down the hill to the chapel, the mine engine house disappears and then reappears between shots See more »

Quotes

Hazel Woodus: The world wasn't made in seven days only for Abel Woodus.
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Alternate Versions

The reedited and shortened version titled "The Wild Heart" was produced after a disagreement and court case between director Michael Powell and producer David O. Selznick. Selznick's changes are mainly:- (1) Adding a prologue. (2) Adding scenes explaining things, often by putting labels or inscriptions on them. (3) Adding more close-ups of Jennifer Jones (Selznick's wife). He also deleted a few scenes that he felt weren't dramatic enough. Sadly some of these were major plot points so the story doesn't make as much sense as the original. In his autobiographies, Powell claimed that Selznick only left about 35 mins of the original film. In fact there's a lot more than that. About 2/3 of the original remains. See more »

Connections

Featured in Kate Bush: Hounds of Love - Under Review (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Sigh No More Ladies
(uncredited)
Words by William Shakespeare (from "Much Ado About Nothing")
Music by Brian Easdale
Performed by Jennifer Jones
See more »

User Reviews

 
Not one of Powell and Pressburger's best
21 January 2007 | by drrapSee all my reviews

I am an enormous admirer of Powell and Pressburger, but this Technicolor melodrama was a great disappointment to me once I had tracked down, with some effort, a Korean DVD. I think the problem is that the main character is simply not very bright - I miss the intelligent , spirited women of I Know Where I'm Going, Black Narcissus, Contraband, and A Canterbury Tale. Here, the character who ought to be carrying the story is reduced to almost animalistic status, a prey in a world of hunters, well-intentioned and not so well intentioned. Nevertheless, the cinematography is stunning as ever, and the choir, and the harp playing, are divine indeed -- as always with P&P, there are gems even in this murky, overheated yarn of country parson versus country squire.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

6 November 1950 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

The Wild Heart See more »

Filming Locations:

Hollywood, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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