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Frauenarzt Dr. Prätorius (1950)

Directors:

Karl Peter Gillmann (as Karl P. Gillmann), Curt Goetz

Writer:

Curt Goetz (play)
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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Curt Goetz Curt Goetz ... Dr. Hiob Prätorius
Valerie von Martens Valerie von Martens ... Maria Violetta
Erich Ponto ... Professor Speiter
Bruno Hübner Bruno Hübner ... Shunderson
Albert Florath Albert Florath ... Pastor Hellriegel
Rudolf Reiff Rudolf Reiff ... Prof. Klotz
Paul Mederow Paul Mederow
Hedwig Wangel Hedwig Wangel
Gertrud Wolle Gertrud Wolle
Wilhelm Meyer-Ottens Wilhelm Meyer-Ottens
Eugen Dumont Eugen Dumont
Werner Westerholt Werner Westerholt
Helga Viermann Helga Viermann
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Margit Kay Margit Kay
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Storyline

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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Details

Country:

West Germany

Language:

German

Release Date:

15 January 1950 (West Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

Docteur Praetorius See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the first major German film project released after World War II. People flocked to the very few cinemas in the still mostly ruined cities just to listen to the exuberant orchestral rendition of "Gaudeamus" (Let us rejoice). See more »

Connections

Version of Dr. med. Hiob Prätorius (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

Ein Studrnt und eine...dentin
Music by Franz Grothe
Lyrics by Willy Dehmel
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User Reviews

When doctors still had lots of time...
3 July 2001 | by frank_olthoffSee all my reviews

A strange movie. Seems like Curt Goetz couldn't quite decide whether to make a comedy or not out of his play because there's a whole lot of melodrama around. In the face of two world wars, Professor Prätorius, a philanthropist and a surgeon, wants to exterminate the one danger to mankind, the microbe of stupidity, as he states in a spontaneous lecture to his male and female students. Later in that speech he utters what great a gift it is to women to have children (enthusiastic acclaim from all listeners). - One of the oddest takes here has Prätorius unnecessarily derobe the corpse of a young woman down to her waist, a seldom-seen example of nudity in early German post-war cinema.

Story proceeds in the same erratic manner, with rather rare swings to the comic side. The parts with the pregnant woman who attempts suicide and the valet who had been sentenced to death before are not funny at all, but serious to the core. They could, in fact, include some unusual statements on abortion, unmarried motherhood and death penalty but that might just as well be way out of the storyline. There is no nightshift stress or professional errors, on the contrary, Prätorius has time enough to conduct a student orchestra (the conducting scenes unfortunately add some self-admiring pathos).

The sound quality is not so good, due to the pic's 50 years of age, but camera work (Fritz Arno Wagner) is very satisfactory. Bruno Hübner is a sight to see as Shunderson, a rôle which might likewise have been played by Fritz Rasp (as it was in the remake fifteen years later). Valérie von Martens (Goetz' real-life wife) and Erich Ponto give proofs of their versatility. (By the way, that's an uncredited Horst Tappert who hands Martens her purchases in a five-second appearance during the surprise photograph of Hübner.)

We have a lot of learned uprightness in the story of "Frauenarzt", generating with a well-off doctor, paired with some funny ideas, but it leaves you unsatisfied: a strange movie.


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